Archive for the ‘Uncategorized’ Category

Coffs Coast Health Club – eNews November 2018

November 1, 2018

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Healthy Inspirations Recipe of the Week – Low Carb Gnocchi

October 4, 2018

Screen Shot 2018-10-04 at 3.11.19 pmReset: Suits all phases

Great Shape: 1 protein, 1 vegetables, 1 dairy

Serves 4

Ingredients

2 cups shredded mozzarella
3 egg yolks
1/2 tsp Italian seasoning
Salt & freshly ground black pepper
8 slices bacon, chopped
2 cups baby spinach
Freshly grated parmesan

Method

  1. Melt mozzarella in microwave for 1 minute. Add egg yolks, one at a time, stirring until completely incorporated.
  2. Stir in Italian seasoning and season with salt and pepper. Divide dough into 4 balls and refrigerate until firm, about 10 minutes.
  3. Roll out each ball into logs about 2cm in diameter, and slice into 2cm pieces to make the “gnocchi”.
  4. In a large pot of salted boiling water, cook gnocchi for 2 minutes. Drain and return to pot. In a large skillet over medium heat, cook bacon until crispy. Drain fat and add spinach and gnocchi and cook for 2 minutes more or until golden.
  5. Garnish with parmesan and freshly ground black pepper and serve.
  6. The basic “gnocchi” recipe is delicious with a napolitana sauce or even with bolognaise.

Screen Shot 2018-10-04 at 3.11.19 pm

Coffs Coast Health Club eNews – October 2018

October 2, 2018

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Anxiety after drinking and what you can do about it

September 30, 2018

original
Anyone who has had a few too many drinks on a night out will know the physical effects you can feel when you wake up the next morning. Throbbing headache, dry mouth, nausea and a desire to never again leave the sanctuary of your doona. But hangovers can take on a more sinister form when the physical effects are coupled with anxiety.

Did you know that in Norway they actually have a distinct word for the anxiety that comes with a hangover? Fylleangst refers to the regret, or fear, over what you may have done the night before whilst intoxicated. And despite the fact no other language lays claim to having a word for this specific state, it’s one that many people can certainly relate to.

It involves feeling a deep sense of uneasiness and concern about one’s behaviour the day/night before. The entire next morning is spent in a panic, trying to review things you might have said or done, and what others who were present will think of you. Throw smartphones and social media into the equation and the dread only gets worse. The morning after often begins with a frantic scramble to see if any embarrassing texts were sent or if any photos/videos were posted to social media. It’s not a fun time.

Here are some comments from beyondblue forum users:

  • “Anytime I drink, whether it’s a few or a lot, the next day I feel the need to call everyone I know was present and make sure I was not an idiot. It’s like I make up my own scenarios of things I may or may not have said.”
  • “After I drink it’s like I have a crash and feel embarrassed even if I didn’t do anything embarrassing. I just feel so guilty and feel the need to apologise to people.”

There is a science behind post-drinking anxiety. When you consume alcohol the chemical balance in your brain is disrupted. Everyone is different, but most people feel more relaxed and less inhibited after a few drinks. The ‘feel-good’ chemical called dopamine is released in greater supply into your brain – resulting in a greater sense of satisfaction than you had before drinking. Alcohol is effectively tricking your brain. You pay little regard to the age-old fact that what comes up, must come down. The next day, your brain is trying feverishly to correct the chemical imbalances from the night before and what do you know – anxiety arises..

So what can you do if you wake up and post-drinking anxiety is taking a hold?

The first thing to know is you’re not alone in this feeling. Far from it. The battling the booze thread in the beyondblue forums is well worth a read; you’ll find many personal stories from people dealing with the negative effects of alcohol.

There are also some helpful techniques you can employ to ease feelings of anxiety:

  • Slow down your breathing. Count to three as you breathe in slowly – then count to three as you breathe out slowly. Feel your heartbeat slow down and try to relax.
  • Stay in the present moment. Just as thinking of what’s five steps ahead of you isn’t healthy, neither is dwelling on things in the past. After you’ve slowed down your breathing, work on acknowledging the here and now. A meditation app like Smiling Mind can help with this.
  • Challenge your self-talk. Anxiety can make you overestimate the negative aspects of a situation and underestimate your ability to handle it. Take a step back and think rationally about the negative thoughts you’re experiencing. Give yourself a break!
  • Eat well. The temptation may be to indulge in greasy fast-food. Resisting this and opting for wholesome food low in GI will help your body recover faster. Hydration is also crucial and will help to ease your headache.
  • Learn. Last but not least, learn from past experiences. You know yourself better than anyone, so if you know having more than a few drinks will have you feeling horrible the next day, set limits and stick to them.

If you find your anxiety post-drinking is regularly lasting longer than 24 hours, or increasing in intensity, go and see your GP.

Article from: https://www.beyondblue.org.au/personal-best/pillar/wellbeing/anxiety-after-drinking-and-what-you-can-do-about-it
Photo sourced from: http://www.thejournal.ie Apr 25th 2017

Healthy Inspirations Recipe of the Week – Balsamic Roast Beef

August 16, 2018

roastbeef
Make a delicious sauce out of the cooking liquid of this amazing roast beef, and delight the family. Serves 8

Ingredients

1.5 kg boneless beef chuck roast
to taste, sea salt and black pepper
2 Tbsp olive oil
1 onion, sliced
2 cloves garlic, minced
1/3 cup balsamic vinegar
1 1/2 cups beef stock
2 bay leaves
1 cup red wine (optional)
2 sprigs fresh rosemary

Method

  1. Season the roast on all sides with sea salt and black pepper. Heat the olive oil over a medium-high heat in a large skillet, and sear the roast on all sides for 2-3 minutes.
  2. Place the meat in the slow cooker and top with the onion, garlic, balsamic vinegar, beef stock, bay leaves and red wine (if using).
  3. Cover the slow cooker, turn it on low, and cook for 8-9 hours.
  4. Remove and discard the bay leaves. Remove the meat and cover loosely with aluminium foil.
  5. Pour the liquid from the slow cooker into a saucepan and bring to a slow boil over a medium-high heat. Keep it boiling and let it reduce until you get the desired consistency for your sauce.
  6. Slice the meat and divide between serving plates. Pour the sauce over the top, and serve with steamed vegies.

Healthy Inspirations Recipe of the Week – Cauliflower Tabbouleh

August 9, 2018

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Suits all phases – Serves 4

Ingredients

1 kg cauliflower
1 cup chopped cucumber
6-8 cherry tomatoes, quartered
1 bunch flat leaf parsley
1/4 cup freshly chopped coriander
1 Tbsp freshly chopped basil
2 garlic cloves, minced
Zest and juice of 1 lemon
1/4 cup + 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
Salt to taste

Method

  1. Cut the cauliflower in half, remove the core, then cut into small florets. In small batches, process the cauliflower in a food processor until small and uniform in size. Transfer over to a large mixing bowl, then continue until all the cauliflower is processed.
  2. Stir in the cucumbers, tomatoes, and chopped herbs.
  3. Toss in the garlic, lemon, and olive oil, stir to combine, then season to taste.

    Photo: https://www.rachaelraymag.com/recipe/cauliflower-tabbouleh

Coffs Coast Health Club eNews – August 2018

August 6, 2018

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Snacking vs Grazing … what’s the difference?

August 5, 2018

snack

What is snacking?

Unlike grazing, traditional snacking is planned and isolated in nature. It is designed as a small meal in between the day’s main meals, to keep you ticking over and to prevent overeating.

It is recommended that snacks are consumed about two hours before or after a main meal. “Being a planned behaviour, snacks are therefore less likely to be in response to stress, boredom or excessive hunger,” says Ms Pirotta.

Dietary guidelines for snacking recommend nutrient-dense, low-energy foods and smaller portion sizes. Research shows that snacks from the core food groups – grains, meat or meat alternatives, fruit, vegetables, dairy or dairy alternatives – when eaten between regular, wholesome main meals (depending on your needs and exercise levels) promote a feeling of fullness and reduce the chance of you eating junk food, or overeating later in the day.

This results in a balanced daily energy intake, helping to support a healthy weight and overall well being.

So what can you do each day to reduce the chance of snacking turning into grazing?

How to reduce grazing

Ms Pirotta recommends these tips to ‘snack right’ and avoid ‘graze days’:

  • Don’t skip breakfast
  • If grazing is an issue,eat every two hours, whether it is a snack or main meal. Try not to eat in shorter time intervals, as this is more like ‘grazing’
  • ‘Sometimes’ foods,or‘junk’ foods can be enjoyed as part of a healthy diet, but not as a main element, especially if you are often sedentary. You’re also more likely to enjoy them when you only eat them ‘sometimes’
  • Aimtodo30minutesofmoderatephysical activity on most days of the week
  • Listen to your body and know when to stop eating. Your energy needs can differ every day, and depend on several things, such
    as what you ate the day before and your physical activity levels. So, remind yourself that you don’t have to finish all the food in front of you
  • Try to eat larger meals earlier in the day and lighter meals later, so your body has time to digest and use the energy across the day, rather than go to bed with a full stomach
  • Practise mindful eating–are you really hungry or are you bored/stressed, or actually thirsty? What other things can you do other than snack?
  • Limit eating  after dinner. If you’re still hungry, have a protein-based snack – eg, nuts, carrot sticks and hummus – or a hard-boiled egg.

The best types of snacks

Ms Pirotta recommends snacks that provide
a protein base with some carbohydrates and healthy fats. Protein makes you feel fuller for longer as it’s digested at a slower rate than carbohydrates. Fat is also digested at a slower rate, but provides the highest energy content, says Ms Pirotta, “so you need to be careful”.

Protein sources throughout the day also help to break up overall protein intake, helping repair the body, especially after an exercise session (for both cardio and resistance-training).

Ms Pirotta’s recommended snacks include:
• Raw nuts(30g=1serve; about a handful)
• Legumes( eg,chickpeas)
• 120g natural yoghurt
• Fruits
• Yoghurt based dips
• Vegetable sticks
• Wholegrain crackers with reduced fat cheese • 1-2 slices of cured meats (eg, smoked salmon). Changing your behaviour may seem daunting at first, but the best way to start is to set small achievable goals, says Ms Pirotta.

“Over time, these small goals will make a big change in the right direction. Even if you don’t meet your goal one day, don’t worry! We’re all human, and it’s human and healthy to indulge sometimes,” she says.

“The key is not to indulge too much too often, and enjoy regular physical activity. But for individualised nutrition advice and professional health behaviour counselling based on your lifestyle, preferences and physical activity levels, it is best to see a dietitian.”

 

3 THINGS TO KNOW

  1. Grazing commonly includes frequent eating of an undefined portion of food, during undefined periods of the day, with short intervals between each ‘graze’.
  2. Snacking is a healthier option. It’s planned and isolated in nature and designed to be a small meal between main meals.
  3. Snacks from core food groups – grains, meat, fruit, vegetables, dairy – help to reduce overeating later in the day.

To learn about healthy eating plans,
visit http://www.jh.today/health4

Sourced from https://jeanhailes.org.au
VOLUME 2 2018

Healthy Inspirations Recipe of the Week – Portabella Sliders

July 31, 2018

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Healthy Inspirations Recipe of the Week – Cheeseburger Casserole

July 5, 2018

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