Archive for the ‘Healthy Inspirations Moonee’ Category

Healthy Inspirations Recipe of the Week – Chunky Winter Vegetable Soup

August 2, 2017

hi
233f6170-9d23-4e45-8d4e-5d4e2913e890

Healthy Inspirations Recipe of the Week – Choc orange, cinnamon & turmeric bliss balls

July 27, 2017

hi
Makes 18

Ingredients

1 cup almond meal
1 cup Shaken Jamaican protein powder
10 dried dates
pinch salt
zest one orange
1 tsp cinnamon powder
1/2 tsp turmeric powder
1/2 cup shredded coconut
1/3 cup water

Method

  1. Combine Food process almond meal and Shaken Jamaican powder.
  2. Add dates and blend until well chopped.
  3. Add salt, zest, cinnamon, turmeric and coconut and pulse.
  4. Add water gradually while blending. The mixture should roll into balls without being sticky, so add more water or add coconut or almond meal to ensure the consistency is right.
  5. Roll into 18 balls and refrigerate until ready to eat.

Is It Better to Exercise on an Empty Stomach?

July 25, 2017

80-percent-diet-20-percent-exercise-750x500
It turns out there may be something to the gym floor “bro science” of exercising on an empty stomach to fire up that coveted fat-burning metabolism. Research published in the March 2017 edition of the American Journal of Physiology–Endocrinology and Metabolism shows that eating versus fasting before a workout can affect gene expression in adipose tissue (your fat stores) in response to exercise.

In the study, British scientists had a small group of overweight men walk at 60% of their maximum oxygen intake for 60 minutes in the morning either in a fasted or a fed state (a carb-rich meal 2 hours before exercise). The research team collected adipose tissue samples before exercise and again 1 hour afterward.

It turned out that adipose gene expression differed between the two trials. In the fasted state, an uptick in genes (specifically two called PDK4 and HSL) indicated an increase in the use of stored fat to fuel metabolism. When subjects exercised after eating, these genes decreased, which could indicate less fat-burning.

After eating, the researchers suggested, our adipose tissue is affected by the food and will not respond in the same way. The upshot is that for people who are eager to shed a few fat pounds, working up a sweat in a fasted state may bring about more favorable metabolic changes in adipose tissue to help treat Buddha-belly.

Still, it remains to be determined whether this outcome would apply to more intense bouts of exercise. Many people find it challenging to keep up the pace in a vigorous workout when their stomach is growling—and if pace suffers, calorie burning will drop overall. It’s important to note that we’re talking fat-burning here, not performance.

IDEA Fitness Journal, Volume 14, Issue 7
by Matthew Kadey, MS, RD on Jun 13, 2017
Sourced here: http://www.ideafit.com/fitness-library/hungry-for-exercise

Healthy Inspirations Recipe of the Week – Slow Roasted Tomato Soup

July 20, 2017

Tomato-Sage-Soup-s

Ingredients

½ red onion
3 cloves garlic, chopped
2 tsp dried Italian herbs
1 tsp fennel seeds
1 Pinch chilli flakes
2 cups tomato juice (unsweetened)
½ cup gluten-free vegetable (or chicken) stock
1 Tbsp extra virgin olive oil
1.5kg tomatoes, halved
3 tsp balsamic vinegar

Method

  1. Preheat oven to 150°C. Scatter the onion, garlic, herbs, fennel seeds and chilli flakes in a deep roasting pan.
  2. Combine the tomato juice, stock, oil and red wine vinegar and season to taste with salt and pepper.
  3. Place the tomatoes, cut side down, on the onion and herb mixture and pour over the tomato juice mixture. Roast for 2 hours.
  4. Remove from the oven and use tongs to remove as much of the tomato skins as possible.
  5. Transfer to a saucepan and blend using a stick mixer. Heat through and add the balsamic vinegar and season with salt and pepper. Serve.

Kill your sugar cravings with these 7 foods

July 18, 2017

dims

So, you’ve ditched the sweet stuff. For the first few days you’re flying high on green veggies and avocado – feeling like a brand new you.

But then, your body starts to realise that you’ve taken away ALL the sugar! Your brain’s sugar craving hormones begin to have a sweet little meltdown and you find yourself longing for that morning muffin, muesli bar and after dinner treat (read: half a pack of biscuits!).

If this sounds all too familiar, don’t sweat it. You’re not alone! We’ve all felt overwhelmed by our sugar cravings at some point (yes, even us) so here are some of the best sugar craving busters we’ve discovered at IQS.

1. Coconut oil.

This is a tried-and-tested trick in the IQS repertoire. “After lunch I still get sweet, ‘I need something more’ cravings,” says Sarah. “So this is my fail-proof trick. I eat two tablespoons of coconut oil. It satisfies my need for something sweet and KILLS appetite for about four to five hours.”

2. Liquorice tea.

The IQS team must literally sweat liquorice tea – we’re all drinking it! With the most amazing sweet aftertaste, you’ll have a hard time believing that it’s naturally sugar-free (unlike the liquorice sweets you can buy).

3. Sweet potato.

Sweet potato (or kumara) is one of the most delicious foods on this planet – fact. The very small amount of sugar will satisfy your cravings, while the starch stops you from overdoing it. Oh, and did we mention that sweet potatoes are ridiculously good for you?

4. Carrot sticks.

Carrots are another sweet veggie with lots of fibre to fill you up. Keep an emergency box of carrot sticks in the fridge, ready to be dipped into guacamole or hummus when the cravings strike.

5. Kombucha.

One of the things people miss most when they quit sugar is soft drinks. We suggest you skip the crappy diet pop and go for 100ml of gut-lovin’ kombucha when you need a fizzy hit. Just make sure it’s a low-sugar brand (we prefer it to be around 1g of sugar per 100ml).

6. Nut butter.

Nuts are full of good fats and proteins, making them perfect for sugar cravings. Almonds and cashews are naturally sweet, too. (Hot tip: if you make your own nut butter, add a heaped teaspoon of cinnamon to the mix to make the most delicious thing you’ve ever tasted.)

7. 85 per cent dark chocolate.

While you’ll have to give up your Twix bars, there’s nothing wrong with a little good quality cacao. A 100g block of 85 per cent dark chocolate has just over a teaspoon of sugar (not that you could finish a whole block!). To take it even further, try a 90 per cent dark chocolate. So good.

We originally published this post in June 2016. We updated it in June 2017.
Source here: https://iquitsugar.com/food-kill-sugar-cravings

​How to take a break from drinking alcohol

July 16, 2017

e2080e0b7a23d25adadb727982faef9a--giving-up-alcohol-ways-to-stop-drinking-alcohol

So you’ve taken on a challenge to take a break from drinking – well done! As well as saving you money and giving you back your Sunday mornings, drinking less comes with a bunch of health benefits.

Of course, it’s not realistic for most of us to quit drinking completely forever. As with most things, moderation is the key for long term healthy living. But for many people, cutting out alcohol completely for a set period such as a month (like FebFast or Dry July) can be a great way to pause, notice how much you’re drinking and how it’s impacting you, and reset your habits.

“If you feel you are drinking too much and it has become a habit, taking a break may just be the way to kick-start changes to that habit.”

Why drink less?

Alcohol is an accepted part of the social structure of Australia, but it is a substance that has the potential to cause a great deal of harm. The effects of alcohol on health are well described and unfortunately, most of it is on the negative side of the health ledger.

Alcohol is a major cause of road injury and a significant contributor to domestic violence while higher rates of heart disease, liver disease, cancer, mental health problems and excess weight are all consequences of long-term heavy drinking. And let’s not forget about the ‘next day’ ill effects from an evening of over-exuberance.

Fortunately, most Australians who drink alcohol do so at levels that have few adverse problems. Low levels of drinking may have some favourable benefits on cardiovascular disease risk (at least in middle-aged people), but other healthy activities like exercise and eating well can give even greater benefits for a whole range of health issues.

“In place of that after-work drink, use a juicer to come up with some speciality fruit and vegetable juices and smoothies.”

Tips for changing your habits

Instead of treating your break from alcohol as just an exercise in willpower, use it as a chance to give your attention to other healthy changes you can make in place of the alcohol you are giving up. If you feel you are drinking too much and it has become a habit, taking a break may just be the way to kick-start changes to that habit.

The key to changing a habit is not eliminating it, but replacing it with something else. And that something else should be a healthier habit. Using these swaps gives you a ‘go to’ when faced with triggers for the habit you’re trying to break.

Focus on what you are gaining, not what you are losing. Here are some tips to help you with this:

  • Remove temptations. Make your home as free from alcohol as possible and put away any alcohol you have stored such as wine and spirits out of sight – you don’t want the reminder of what you’re giving up when you get home after a hard day.
  • Replace with healthier beverages. In place of that after-work drink, use a juicer to come up with some speciality fruit and vegetable juices and smoothies. Don’t have a quality juicer? The money you’ll save from not drinking will easily finance this.
  • Get outside and get moving. Take advantage of waking up not feeling seedy on a weekend as a chance to get out for some early morning activity. Checking out the weekend farmers’ markets would be the perfect way to stock up on healthy food for the week.
  • Think outside the box. Social situations involving alcohol may be hard to avoid, but if you have any control over the plans, suggest other places to meet up with friends that don’t normally involve alcohol, such as weekend brunch.
  • Team up. Don’t do it alone. Friendly support and a small dose of competition is a great motivational tonic, so team up with someone else.

Healthy Inspirations Recipe of the Week – Chunky Winter Vegetable Soup

July 13, 2017

hi2hi

Winter Workout Advice

July 9, 2017

577c8494-c223-4e7a-9421-66035cb93463

Tips for Working Out in Winter

As the weather gets cooler we can be tempted to sleep through our alarm in the morning and stay under the doona, or head straight home after a long cold day at work but it is important for your health and well-being that you continue exercising right through the Winter months. In order to boost your immune system, maintain your fitness and keep your mind happy and active, regular exercise is essential.

1. It is warmer inside the gym than it is outside and your favourite class is going to get you hot and sweaty but make sure that you wear layers to and from the club so that your muscles stay warm. Remove the layers as you warm up during class and then add them back on as you cool off.
2. Hydration is very important and although you may not feel as thirsty when it is cold you need to ensure that you drink before, during and after class.
3. Allow a little extra time before class to warm up on a piece of cardio equipment or by doing some dynamic stretching. Warming the muscles up adequately will prevent injury.
4. Put your favourite classes in your diary at the start of the week and commit to those work outs like you would any other appointment.
5. If you are finding that you are hitting the snooze button too often why not try leaving your alarm on the other side of the bedroom. Once you are up to switch it off you are up for the day.
6. If you are attending an early morning class lay your workout gear out ready for you to slip in to straight away or even sleep in your gear. If you are heading to the gym after work make sure you have everything in your car ready to go so there is no temptation to head home for any reason before heading to your class.

The great thing about group exercise is that you get to sweat it out with other people who are motivated, inspired and pushed by your instructor. So don’t hibernate this winter – get in to the club and get warm while you get fitter, stronger and healthier!

Healthy Inspirations Recipe of the Week – Pizza Casserole

July 6, 2017

 

hi

hi

The Truth About Addiction

July 4, 2017

Addiction-Cover-1
What is Really Behind Addiction?

Ever notice how frequently the word “addict” is used? Just do a Google News search on the word and you’ll be shocked at just how often it’s used in a headline. Articles are plastered with mentions of drug addicts, sex addicts, gambling addicts, food addicts, shopping addicts, work addicts and internet addicts. “These people” are painted as out-of-control and often menaces to society who need to be stopped, jailed, medicated or otherwise cut off.

But what if those diseased people weren’t sick at all? What if you suddenly realized you were one of them? Well, that’s what happened to me. In preparation for this podcast, I realized I’m an addict. I’m an addict who comes from other addicts, who has passed it onto my kids, too. I’m constantly looking for a way to not be with myself, a way to avoid the pain that I have, of not having meaningful bonds.

A Different Way of Looking at Addiction

Physician and best-selling author, Gabor Maté, shares the shocking truth about what causes addiction and the things we can do to address the problem. What’s cool about Gabor is that he avoids quick-fix thinking when he tackles things like addiction, ADHD, sickness and the human spirit overall. Rather, he shines lights on the often uncomfortable truths that live at the root of these things.

Born in Hungary, Gabor survived the Holocaust, became a doctor and worked for over 20 years with patients with hard-core drug addictions, mental illness and HIV before writing In the Realm of Hungry Ghosts, When the Body Says No, Scattered Minds, and Hold on to Your Kids (you can learn more on his website drgabormate.com).

Our brief but information-packed conversation even helped me understand why I love podcasting. These conversations  are sort of accelerated intimacy that create quick bonds with each person I talk to and anything that helps me bond, lessens the painful void I have from having that very thing growing up.

I remember hearing somewhere that the purpose of life is to create meaningful connections with others. After this conversation with Gabor, I know you’ll have a new point of view of exactly why that’s so important and how and why we as individuals, families and cultures have strayed so far from it.


Addiction Specialist Dr Gabor Mate.

The Opposite Of Addiction is Connection

Do Stronger Human Connections Immunise Us Against Emotional Distress?

Right now an exciting new perspective on addiction is emerging. Johann Harri, author of Chasing The Scream, recently captured widespread public interest with his Ted talk Everything You Know About Addiction Is Wrong, where he concluded with this powerful statement:

The opposite of addiction is not sobriety. The opposite of addiction is connection. – Johann Harri

These sentiments are augmented by a growing number of experts, including addiction specialist Dr Gabor Maté, who cites ’emotional loss and trauma’ as the core of addiction. Compare this ’emotional loss’ to Johan Harri’s idea about lack of connection and it is clear they’re talking about a similar emotional condition.

Limbic Resonance

If connection is the opposite of addiction, then an examination of the neuroscience of human connection is in order. Published in 2000, A General Theory Of Love is a collaboration between three professors of psychiatry at the University of California in San Francisco. A General Theory Of Love reveals that humans require social connection for optimal brain development, and that babies cared for in a loving environment are psychological and neurologically ‘immunised’ by love. When things get difficult in adult life, the neural wiring developed from a love-filled childhood leads to increased emotional resilience in adult life. Conversely, those who grow up in an environment where loving care is unstable or absent are less likely to be resilient in the face of emotional distress.

How does this relate to addiction? Gabor Maté observes an extremely high rate of childhood trauma in the addicts he works with and trauma is the extreme opposite of growing up in a consistently safe and loving environment. He asserts that it is extremely common for people with addictions to have a reduced capacity for dealing with emotional distress, hence an increased risk of drug-dependence.

How Our Ability To Connect Is Impaired By Trauma

Trauma is well-known to cause interruption to healthy neural wiring, in both the developing and mature brain. A deeper issue here is that people who have suffered trauma, particularly children, can be left with an underlying sense that the world is no longer safe, or that people can no longer be trusted. This erosion (or complete destruction) of a sense of trust, that our family, community and society will keep us safe, results in isolation – leading to the very lack of connection Johann Harri suggests is the opposite of addiction. People who use drugs compulsively do so to avoid the pain of past trauma and to replace the absence of connection in their life.

Social Solutions To Addiction

The solution to the problem of addiction on a societal level is both simple and fairly easy to implement. If a person is born into a life that is lacking in love and support on a family level, or if due to some other trauma they have become isolated and suffer from addiction, there must be a cultural response to make sure that person knows that they are valued by their society (even if they don’t feel valued by their family). Portugal has demonstrated this with a 50% drop in addiction thanks to programs that are specifically designed to re-create connection between the addict and their community.

Personal Solutions To Addiction

“Ask not why the addiction, but why the pain.”
– Gabor Maté

Recreating bonds is essential in the long term, but human connection is crucial in in the immediate task of clearing trauma. When a person decides to finally face and feel the pain that they may have been avoiding for years or decades, the first steps cannot be done alone.

“You have to be with that pain, but you have to have support.”
– Gabor Maté

This support is essentially the reintroduction of the care and support which is so important in creating the neural structure of emotional-resilience in early life. By doing so, we begin to replace what was missing, and thanks to the revelations of neuroplasticity we now know that you can in fact teach an old dog new tricks; neural rewiring is possible in adult life. Though it is essential for addicts to feel supported in order to finally face and feel the pain they have been trying to avoid, this is ultimately an inner journey that must be taken by the individual.

“Whatever you do, don’t try and escape from your pain, but be with it. Because the attempt to escape from pain creates more pain.”
The Tibetan Book Of Living And Dying

The Roots Of Healing

When we are young, our parents care for us until we are able to do it for ourselves, after all they won’t be there to do it for us forever. Perhaps, on an emotional level this is also true: our parents love us so that we may learn to do it for ourselves. The programs in Portugal have demonstrated that addicts do remarkably well when they feel valued by their community. Whether they realise it or not, the Portuguese are creating positive limbic modelling by valuing the addicts so they can learn to value themselves. When people are there to provide loving support for an addict wishing to face the emotional pain they carry, they are loving them and caring for them until they can learn do love themselves. With this in mind, perhaps the neural-wiring of emotional resilience developed through the loving reflection of another, once fully developed, could simply be called self-love.

Info sourced from: Sam Lawrence on Tuesday September 6th, 2016
http://upliftconnect.com/what-causes-addiction/
http://upliftconnect.com/opposite-addiction-connection/