Archive for the ‘Exercise with a Friend’ Category

Glen Barnett discusses Exercise as Medicine

August 2, 2016

exercise-is-medicine

Here is a concept that I really want you to consider, I want you to view exercise and being active as medicine, a dose of goodness to manage your health, weight and wellness.  It has been proven over and over that as a preventative measure to ill health and as a ‘cure’ for a lot of ailments, exercise is the best medicine around.

So if we know that this ‘medicine’ called exercise can have such a positive effect on our well being then why isn’t everyone taking their daily dose?   Who knows maybe fear, laziness or indecision?  Here’s some help.

Start with a goal and see your goal as being your dessert – something you’re really looking forward to but you need to earn it.   Get to your goal in small bite size pieces. If your goal is to drop 20kg then plot some smaller increments in your calendar rather than the big figure down the track.

Make sure you get your exercise dosage correct so get some guidance.  It is important to know how much exercise should be ‘absorbed’ to give you the maximum benefit for your goal.  Exercise should be prescribed in a specific dose you know that works for you including type, intensity, frequency and duration.  Definitely sample different types of exercise medicine, until you’ve found what ‘medicinal remedy’ fits best with you or is easiest to swallow.   Basically make sure the exercise you ‘take’ is something you enjoy and something that is going to help you get to your goal.

Make a commitment to your health, yourself and your future. Taking a daily dose of exercise medicine in some way nearly every day will lead to a positive lifestyle change and a very healthy habit

So if you decide you want to get a dose of one of the best medicines for your health, call me, “Dr” Glen, at Coffs Coast Health Club on 66586222 and we can organise a FREE prescription to get you started.

 

Over 50’s Fitness by Glen Barnett – Exercise as a Tonic

November 24, 2015

exercise tonic

Like a spoonful of sugar makes the medicine go down, a dose of exercise is the best tonic for mental (and physical) wellness.

Lets put aside the obvious medical conditions that we already know are benefitted by exercise and look at another condition –  menopause.

Menopause  is a very challenging time for women with a lot of hormonal, physical and mental changes occurring at once without warning and often leaving the woman with no idea when they will end.  Trying to ‘stay sane’ during this period of a woman’s life is how some women describe their battle with a body that is not doing what it has done all their lives. Menopause brings with it a body that is laying down fat in different areas; a body that the woman doesn’t often recognise as the one she’s ‘grown up’ with.   The benefits of exercise on our mental state during this time, can have an overriding effect on the physical symptoms that may present.

Exercise, relaxation and breathing exercises assist in helping the menopausal woman feel that she is taking back some control of the unpredictability of her menopausal symptoms.  The relaxation and the breathing give her strategies to deal with the mood swings and hot flushes. The exercise (and also dietary guidance) assists with the changes in her body weight and body fat placement and the stretching helps relieve discomfort in joints and muscles that often feel stiffer through this stage of life.

Never underestimate the benefit of a walk in the park or on the beach or just around the block, a good stretching session,  and/or an upside down yoga class.  Be proactive and make exercise your tonic to wellness.

At Coffs Coast Health Club we can really help you achieve the benefits I’ve described in this article. Give Glen or Jacqui a call on 66586222 for a free chat and let’s see how we can help you.

Top tips for getting fit (if you’re not much of an athlete)

September 13, 2015

fit
If you’re not much of an athlete right now, here are some ideas to help you get in shape.

Your running shoes/tennis racquet/softball glove/high-school sports trophy collection are tucked into the back of some closet, quietly gathering dust. Nowadays your main form of exercise is walking between the couch and the fridge. You’re handier with the remote than you are with a racquet.

And yet … you’d like to be in better shape. Maybe even train in a particular sport. Maybe even compete in the Senior Games. Crazy, right — at your age?

Nope. You’re never too old for physical activity, said Mary Frances Visser, a professor of human performance at Mankato State University who researches the effects of exercise on older adults.

“Physiologically there are no real limits,” said Visser, an associate editor for the Journal of Aging and Physical Activity. “You’re limited by your own physiology in certain ways, but in terms of saying ‘Nobody over the age of 60 should ever do X’ — that’s nuts.”

Aging itself can bring upon a desire for better health, said Gary Westlund, founder and president of Charities Challenge, a nonprofit that sponsors races focusing on health issues.

“It’s a very common experience that people, when they get into their 60s and even 70s, one of their motivations is, ‘I want to be a better man this year than I was last year,’ That includes, of course, ‘I want to be healthier, fitter, I want to run faster, row faster,’” said Westlund, who is certified as a health and fitness specialist by the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM).

Exercise is especially important as you get older because physically fit people are better able to cope with, and heal from, health challenges that accompany aging.

Even if you’re already experiencing some of those challenges — even if you basically haven’t risen from the couch since George Bush Sr. was president — it is possible to get back what you have lost.

Visser knows a woman who “was a total couch potato all of her life” until, at 55, she decided to compete in the Senior Games in the 50-yard dash. She spent a year training and eventually “wound up medaling in the 100-yard dash in the National Senior Games.”

Westlund met an 85-year-old runner at his organization’s Challenge Aging 5K race last fall.

“It was his first road race I believe, or one of his first road races. He had taken up running at 83. He had the fastest 5K time in Minnesota last year — at any 5K — for a man 85 or older.”

This year’s Minnesota Senior Games are May 28 to 31 — probably too tight a deadline if you’re just now lacing up a new pair of sneakers. But you could start training for next year, Visser said. (And next year’s state games are qualifiers for the nationals.)

If you have a medical condition — high blood pressure, diabetes, heart history problems, joint disease — check with your doctor, Westlund said. Otherwise, women up to age 55 and men up to 45 can probably start doing light to moderate exercise without the doctor’s green light. Information about aging and physical activity is available at the ACSM’s website (www.acsm.org), the National Institutes of Health’s Senior Health site (www.nihseniorhealth.gov/exerciseforolderadult) and the National Institute on Aging’s site (www.nia.nih.gov/health/publication/exercise-physical-activity/introduction).

When you first start, don’t expect to whip yourself into shape in a week. “The human body at 20 and the human body at 50 are very different,” Visser said. “You can really, really hurt yourself if you do too much too soon.”

Visser recommends starting with five minutes of activity and working up to eight, then 10 and on up to at least 30. Add weightlifting, stretching and so on to regain muscle mass, flexibility and balance.

Article sourced here:  http://www.startribune.com/lifestyle/goodlife/300831881.html

Over 50’s Fitness by Glen Barnett – Keeping Cool in the Summer

February 10, 2015

Keeping Cool In Summer

Keeping cool when temperatures reach record highs isn’t just about comfort. Dangerously high temperatures can result in heat-related illnesses ranging from heat cramps to heat exhaustion and heat stroke. The following tips can help you keep cool all summer long.

  1. Alter your pattern of outdoor exercise to take advantage of cooler times (early morning or late evening). If you can’t change the time of your workout, scale it down by doing fewer minutes, walking instead of running, or decreasing your level of exertion.
  2. Wear loose-fitting clothing, preferably of a light colour.
  3. Cotton clothing will keep you cooler than many synthetics.
  4. Fill a spray bottle with water and keep it in the refrigerator for a quick refreshing spray to your face after being outdoors.
  5. Fans can help circulate air and make you feel cooler even in an air-conditioned house.
  6. Try storing lotions or cosmetic toners in the refrigerator to use on hot, overtired feet.
  7. Take frequent baths or showers with cool or tepid water.
  8. Combat dehydration by drinking plenty of water along with sources of electrolytes when profusely sweating.
  9. If you’re wearing a cap or hat, remove it and pour a bit of ice cold water into the hat, then quickly invert it and place on your head.
  10. Avoid caffeine and alcohol as these will promote dehydration.
  11. Instead of hot foods, try lighter summer fare including frequent small meals or snacks containing cold fruit or low fat dairy products. As an added benefit, you won’t have to cook next to a hot stove.
  12. If you don’t have air-conditioning, arrange to spend at least parts of the day in a shopping centre, public library, movie theater, or other public space that is cool. Many cities have cooling centers that are open to the public on sweltering days.
  13. Finally, use common sense. If the heat is intolerable, stay indoors when you can and avoid activities in direct sunlight or on hot asphalt surfaces. Pay special attention to the elderly, infants, and anyone with a chronic illness, as they may dehydrate easily and be more susceptible to heat-related illnesses. Don’t forget that pets also need protection from dehydration and heat-related illnesses too.

One final thing is that we can always head down to the water for a dip to stay cool. Whether we head to the Jetty, A patrolled beach or a river/creek to stay cool and have a splash around. You will enjoy remaining cool after a dip in the early hours and again in the late afternoon.

Stay cool and safe, for any more information call Glen Barnett at Coffs Coast Health Club on 66586222.

Over 50’s Fitness by Glen Barnett – Top 10 Health Tips (Part Two)

November 18, 2014

laughter_600x450I hope you got a lot out of my Top 4 health and fitness tips from last week.  Here are my other top 6 tips. They may not all be your cup of tea but they are worth pondering to see if they can make a difference in your world, or may make a difference to someone you know who needs a bit of help,  a good kick in the butt or a wake up call.

Exercise your mind – it’s a muscle too.
Exercise those neural pathways and learn something new
Overcome frustration when you’re surfing the net, posting on Face Book, Twittering or even checking you email in box – your brain enjoys the challenge.
If you haven’t explored or haven’t a clue what I’m talking about in that previous point then enrol in a computer course today.
Don’t forget good old crosswords, Sudoku and scrabble to keep your brain from atrophying.

Get Educated and take control of what is going on for you.
Got a health issue?  Understand it so you can be the final decision maker in any treatment that you need rather than being lead along a blinkered path.
Ask questions.
Get clarification.

Don’t focus on what you can’t do, focus on what you can do and then build on them.  Things may seem tough and get you down but take this into consideration:
Remember there’s always someone worse off than you that wishes they could do what you can do, so cherish the things you can do.

Choose your attitude – you can choose to have a bad day or you can choose to have great day.
Having a bad day? Someone else is having a worse one.
Choosing to have a good day could be the simple choice of wearing a frown or a smile.

Dance, laugh and sing regularly and feel those endorphins flood your soul.
“You don’t stop laughing when you grow old, you grow old when you stop laughing (or dancing, or singing).”
Give It a try – you want regret it.

Make sure every day when you leave your house you have remembered the most important but often forgotten thing to wear – your smile.
Wear a smile and have friends, wear a frown and have wrinkles.
We would love to see you down at Coffs Coast Health Club so why not give Glen a call on 66586222 and come on in for a free class or session.

Over 50’s Fitness by Glen Barnett – Tennis Fitness

November 4, 2014

Two For Tennis

When someone talks about having a bit of  a ‘hit and giggle’ they are probably talking about a social tennis game unless of course they have some other kinky pastimes.  Tennis is one of the more physically challenging games that our older population enjoy.  Your agility, fitness and reaction time need to be up to scratch not to mention your strength and flexibility.  Let’s cover a few pointers to help you.
Firstly start with the basics and get some tennis coaching from an experienced coach.  They will guide you through technique, coordination, agility drills and even discuss best footwear choices with you.  You will find these lessons invaluable.
My biggest suggestion to assist you with your game aside from tennis coaching is to improve your cardiovascular fitness and strength.  There is a good saying that a strong tennis player will be a better tennis player. Strength training is imperative especially for your legs, chest, back rotator cuff muscles, forearms, torso and core.  A simple strength training program for the above muscles can be prescribed by a Personal Trainer and should be done 2-3 times a week.  Accompany this with relevant stretches and you have this area of your training covered.
Next is your cardiovascular fitness.  As tennis can be more of a stop/start activity you want cardiovascular activities that will provide that for you.  This is normally called interval training.  For example after a 5-10minute moderate walking warmup on a treadmill,  increase the speed for a good minute then reduce it to an easy recovery walk for 30 seconds. Continue this for up to 20-30 minutes.  This harder intensity/easier intensity interval training can be also used on a bike, rower or even outdoors by finding some hills for the harder component.   Incorporate this 2-3 times a week and you will really see the difference in your fitness during your game.
In tennis you tend to move forwards, backwards and side to side therefore you should incorporate exercises that mimic the travelling you will do on the court.  Your tennis coach will no doubt give you drills to improve your reaction time and directional changes so make sure you pay attention and practice these as often as possible.
I’m going to leave you with something to think about –   You Get What You Train For.  If you sit on the couch watching TV and making poor food choices you would be training to be a Norm.  If you want to play tennis, golf, bowls or any other activity then take the time to do what it takes to play and enjoy that game over and over,  free from strains, sprains and pains.  Enjoy yourself and give Glen at Coffs Coast Health Club on 66586222 if you want to learn more.