Archive for the ‘Coffs Coast Health Club’ Category

Coffs Coast Health Club eNews – May 2018

May 1, 2018

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Coffs Coast Health Club eNews – April 2018

April 5, 2018

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Fire Up the Furnace – Science of Metabolism

March 25, 2018

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One of the many benefits of exercise is its associated ‘energetic cost’; that is
the energy expended during the physical activity itself. This in turn assists with weight loss and maintenance, one of the most common client exercise goals. But another important element of the ‘energetic cost’ of exercise is its impact on our metabolism in the post-exercise recovery period, whereby more energy is expended, even at rest.

This phenomenon is known as Excess Post-Exercise Oxygen Consumption (EPOC) or the ‘afterburn effect’. “It’s essentially
a ‘free’ benefit from the exercise,” says
Dr Kristian Karstoft, Group Leader in the Centre for Physical Activity Research at Rigshospitalet, Denmark.

We take a closer look at what EPOC is, and specific approaches to exercise that can help trigger it.

SCIENCE OF METABOLISM

We know metabolism acts much like a fuel-burning furnace in the body, but what exactly is it? “In the context of exercise, metabolism can be broadly defined as

the chemical process by which the body breaks down and creates substrates to generate or store energy,” says Dr Chris McGlory, Postdoctoral Research Fellow in McMaster University’s Exercise Metabolism Research Group. “During exercise, there is an increase in oxygen demand to maintain ATP homeostasis, however, following the cessation of exercise, rates of oxygen consumption remain elevated in the minutes and hours post-exercise.” This effect occurs due to numerous physiological recovery responses in the body to prior exercise that require oxygen, hence EPOC kicks in.

THE TWO PHASES OF EPOC

EPOC can be broken down into two phases that help return the body to its normal resting state. The first, most pronounced phase (called the fast component) happens for about an hour after a workout, and involves processes such as replenishing

oxygen stores in the blood and muscles, reduction of the heart rate and body temperature, maintaining muscle ATP and creatine phosphate stores and converting lactate back to pyruvate.

The second, extended component phase of EPOC happens for a longer period of time, but at a lower level, and can include processes such as restoration of muscle glycogen stores, muscle tissue repair, processes involving hormones such as insulin and an increase of sympathetic nervous system activity.1 2

FIRING UP METABOLISM

In many instances, we know exercise increases our resting metabolic rate via EPOC, but are there specific approaches to exercise that are more likely to trigger this effect? It turns out, intensity is key. “EPOC is directly proportional to the amount of exercise you’ve done, so if you’ve just gone for a half-hour walk, it isn’t going to do much because you haven’t caused much metabolic stress or used that much oxygen in the first place,” says Professor John Hawley, Director of the Centre

for Exercise and Nutrition at the Mary MacKillop Institute for Health Research. “However, if you’ve run 10km or done something hard at maximal effort, your heart rate and therefore metabolic rate can be increased for up to 24-48 hours.”

Interestingly, exercise duration and intensity have different impacts on the magnitude of EPOC – the former has a linear relationship, whereas the latter
has what’s called a curvilinear (in this case, a greater) impact.3 “The relationship between exercise duration and EPOC is not as great as the relationship between exercise intensity and EPOC,” explains

RATES OF OXYGEN

CONSUMPTION REMAIN ELEVATED DURING THE MINUTES AND HOURS POST-EXERCISE.

Exercise #intensity is a key factor in Excess Post-Exercise Oxygen Consumption (EPOC). #exerciseresearch

Karstoft. “If you double exercise duration, you’ll probably also double EPOC, but if you double intensity, you’ll more than double EPOC.”

As McGlory adds, “it has been suggested that intensity can account for around 45% of the variation in excess post-exercise oxygen consumption, with duration accounting for approximately 10%.” The takeaway? While long sessions will raise metabolism, high-intensity exercise activates multiple metabolic systems
and is a more time-efficient approach for expending energy.

THE ROLE OF
RESISTANCE TRAINING
As well as high-intensity exercise, resistance training is another powerful way to fire
up the metabolism. “Resistance exercise training is a viable method to increase excess post-exercise oxygen consumption, especially when performing it to volitional failure,” explains McGlory. “This is because performing resistance exercise also requires energy to support the generation of contractile force.” Similar to high-intensity training, repeated loaded contraction performed to failure in weight training is advantageous.4

Another metabolism-boosting benefit of resistance training is its effect on building muscle mass. “Muscle consumes more energy at rest compared to fat, which is quite inert and doesn’t have an active role in locomotion,” says Hawley. “An analogy

I use is that having an athletic body is like having a car in the garage that’s ticking over in first gear overnight; so it’s burning more fuel than if it was completely turned off.” Similarly, having a higher muscle mass acts as a ‘sink’ for fuels and oxygen to get turned over at rest, meaning more energy is burnt overall.

Article sourced from Fitness Australia, Autumn 2017

The Secret to Dieting Success? Sleep

March 13, 2018

Why-Sleep-Is-Important-for-Weight-Loss
Sure, eating less is the main driver of weight loss, but nailing the right amount of shut-eye each night helps too

Spring is fast approaching. For many of you, that means a race is on the horizon, so it’s time to turn up your training, dial in your diet, and rebuild your trail legs. But as you begin this performance-minded overhaul of your waking hours, you should also consider the one-third of your day where you do nothing at all: your sleeping hours.

“I often find myself in this dilemma where I could wake up early and go for a run or I could get an extra 20 to 30 minutes of sleep,” says Chris Winter, a sleep researcher who consults for various professional teams and author of The Sleep Solution. “Most days, I’d probably be better off getting the sleep.”

Roughly 40 percent of us don’t get seven or more hours of sleep. But logging shut-eye is associated with better fitness and athletic performance. Winter, for example, conducted a study that showed professional baseball players who didn’t get enough sleep had shorter careers in the majors. One reason may be that sleep helps you recover from hard training. “The lion’s share of growth hormone secretion happens during deep sleep,” says Winter.

And while eating less is generally agreed to be the main driver of weight loss, fixing your approach to sleep may actually be one of the easiest ways to cut weight. The number of sleep hours you get is a strong predictor of what and how much you eat. People who slept five hours or fewer, for example, consumed nearly 700 daily calories more than people who got a full night’s sleep, according to research. That’s about seven pieces of bread, three PowerBars, or a McDonald’s quarter-pounder with fries that can up and vanish from your daily diet.

“When a body is sleepy, you try to eat to stay awake,” Winter says. Blame biology. When you’re sleep-deprived, the appetite-regulating hormone leptin drops and the hunger hormone ghrelin spikes. You’re most likely to crave calorie-dense, high-carb foods—stuff like tortilla chips and granola bars—over vegetables.

Incremental weight loss and muscle gain is more important now than ever as you start to ramp up your training. According to research, most people end the winter nearly five pounds heavier than they started it. That extra flab doesn’t just affect your health—it can kill performance. Data from marathon runners even shows that higher body-fat percentage is tied to slower finishing times, even when you’re talking only five pounds.

So get some sleep. The simplest way is to make your bedroom feel like a cave.

#1. Darken Your Room

If you can see anything at all in your bedroom at night, it’s too bright. Light is the main disruptor of the sleep process, Winter says. The solution, he says, is to buy blackout curtains for your windows and rid electronics from your bedroom (or, at least, put tape over their lights). If it’s still too bright, use a sleeping mask.

#2. Kill the Noise

If you fall asleep to the din of Netflix, you’re setting yourself up to have your sleep interrupted, and that can blunt recovery-enhancing processes like growth hormone release, Winter says. Set your TV on a sleep timer. If your room is still loud—looking at you, apartment dwellers—invest in earplugs.

#3. Turn Down the Thermostat

“There’s new research that says temperature may be just as important as light in controlling sleep patterns,” Winter says. Cooler is better. Aim for 66 degrees: A study found that people who slept in a 66-degree room not only slept better but also boosted their ability to metabolize fats and sugars.

 

Written by: Michael Easter
https://www.outsideonline.com/2283696/easiest-way-fix-your-diet-sleep

Coffs Coast Health Club eNews – March 2017

March 1, 2018

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KIDS WITH TYPE 2 DIABETES IS RISING. BUT DIETARY CHANGES CAN HELP

November 4, 2017

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Data from the huge SEARCH for Diabetes in Youth study – that includes more than a whopping 20,000 participants – reports the incidence of type 2 diabetes is increasing in our children.1 We are talking a 7% rise annually between 2002 and 2012.

Until recently, type 2 diabetes was referred to as ‘adult-onset’. Now, kids as young as 3 years are being diagnosed.

Type 2 diabetes is largely preventable, yet can lead to significant health issues, including cardiovascular disease,2 blindness, amputations and even reduced length of life. This is aside from onerous the day-to-day monitoring and management, and symptoms such as depression and a poorer quality of life.3;4

Causes of type 2 diabetes are multifactorial, with familial, lifestyle and environmental factors at play.

From a dietary perspective, to reduce the risk of developing the condition here are some things to consider for you and your kids.

Reduce added sugar intake
Surprise! Too much sweet stuff may contribute to the onset of type 2 diabetes – especially regular consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages. Leave the highly refined sweet stuff behind, and replace with whole foods like fruit and healthful drinks like water and unsweetened tea.

Replace refined and heavily processed foods with real foods
Any food far removed from its original state should be limited. Heavily refined oils and trans-fats should be replaced with less processed oils and healthy fats, such as olive oil, nuts, avocado and oily fish.

Fibre-less flours can be just as detrimental to the body as added sugars. Instead, choose whole foods that are low in glycaemic load, swapping white rice for quinoa, or white flour for ground buckwheat, coconut or almond meal. 

Create a healthy gut
The state of our intestinal microbiome can influence our health in a variety of ways. Recent research indicates the prevalence of certain gut bugs may be linked to precursors of type 2 diabetes. Considering our diet hugely affects which microbial populations of the intestine thrive or decline, more attention should be paid to keeping those helpful guts bugs nourished to keep the unhelpful ones at bay.

A great place to start is limiting intake of heavily processed foods while ensuring fibre intake is up and enjoying some fermented foods.

Stabilize blood glucose fluctuations
Enabling blood sugar highs followed by almighty lows increases the risk for pre-diabetes and type 2 diabetes. You can manage the blood sugar swing by eating regularly throughout a day, ensuring meals and snacks are comprised of ingredients offering fibre, healthy fats and protein. This offers a slow, steady release of energy to the body and therefore avoids the extreme fluctuation in blood glucose levels and high demand for insulin production. 

Enjoy plenty of anti-inflammatory foods
Blood concentrations of inflammatory markers such as CRP, TNF-a, & IL-6 are elevated in type 2 diabetes. While inflammation has it’s role in the body – such as healing the skin of a grazed knee – we don’t want to be living in high and chronically inflamed state. Choose to eat foods that keep inflammation in check, such as leafy greens, deep coloured berries, fresh herbs and spices, and heaps of vegetables.

Chat with a pro
Overall, if you’ve concerns or a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes has already been made, please do chat with your trusted healthcare professional. They can run tests and work with you on a personalized diet, lifestyle and (if necessary) medical treatment plan to help turn type 2 diabetes around.

By Angela Johnson (BHSc Nut. Med)

http://thatsugarfilm.com/blog/2017/10/12/kids-with-type-2-diabetes-is-rising-but-dietary-changes-can-help/

Healthy Inspirations Recipe of the Week – Banana & Prune Muffins

October 19, 2017

banana-prune-muffins
Serves 4

Ingredients

2 Tbsp coconut oil
1 ripe banana
100g prunes, chopped
2 eggs
6 scoops Protein Powder Vanilla Cream
1/2 cup almond meal
2 Tbsp sour cream

Method

  1. Place melted coconut oil in a bowl. Add mashed banana and chopped prunes and mix.
  2. Add eggs and sour cream and mix well.
  3. Add Proti Powder and almond meal and mix to combine.
  4. Place in muffin pans and bake at 170 C for about 20 minutes, or until the tops are lightly browned.

HSC advice from someone who survived

October 15, 2017

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It’s hard to avoid the impression that your Year 12 mark matters immensely. But remember, there are many pathways to where you want to go, and that number you think is all-important will eventually be forgotten, writes Dom Knight.

Today is the first day of the HSC, those three letters calculated to terrify Year 11 and 12 students and which I still can’t hear without experiencing flashbacks.

So, to all HSC and other Year 12 students, please allow me to offer you my sincerest condolenceswish you the very best of luck!

Talk to anyone who’s slogged through and obtained the NSW qualification, or the VCE or WACE or anything like it, and they’ll tell you that end-of-school exams are a uniquely cruel prank to play on 17-year-olds, especially when uni is never anything like as harrowing as the hoops you have to jump through to get there.

On the bright side, today is the first day of a few weeks of inconvenience you have to endure before getting on with the rest of your life, whatever that may entail. Which is hugely exciting.

Here are a few things that might help you transition from the ranks of those dreading their end-of-school exams to those delighted that they’ll never have to do them again.

Sleep

You’ll be tempted to stay up all night cramming, but that really isn’t a smart idea. You’ve been studying all year. You’ve done the trials. You almost certainly know everything you need to know already, and the honest truth is that exhaustion will probably hurt your performance more than stuffing your brain full of last-minute facts will benefit it. Worst of all, you might end up confusing yourself in your exhaustion.

Get a good pen

Boringly practical, I know – but if you’ve got a crappy biro, you’ll write less and your hand will cramp. Get one of those nifty rollerball pens where the ink flows freely without needing any pressure from your hand. I got ridiculous and bought a fountain pen because I thought it would let me write the most, but there’s no need to get that stupid unless you get a kick out of the idea. Oh, and get some spares, too.

Plan your essay answers

As a humanities guy, my HSC experience was full of 40 minute essays. Despite the temptation to start writing immediately, things always went better when I took a minute or two to work out some kind of logical structure.

Unfortunately HSC markers still don’t recognise listicles like this one, so you will need to construct some kind of an argument. Being ‘right’ or ‘wrong’ isn’t really a possibility – it’s all about trying to write convincingly.

Find a way to take your mind off it

In Year 12, I convinced myself that what I should do right before any exam was play Tetris on my monochrome Nintendo Game Boy, because it’s impossible to freak out about how maybe you’ve forgotten certain key characteristics of flowering plants when there are different-shaped blocks to stack to the sound of a mesmeric Russian folksong.

These days you probably have far more sophisticated games on your phone, but the point is the same – we benefit from taking our minds out of a stressful situation. Whether it’s having a bath, lying in the sun or going for a swim, having some brain downtime will help.

Know that courses with higher entry requirements aren’t necessarily better

At school, I had my heart set on a certain course because it was supposed to be prestigious, and I thought that if I got into it, everyone would think I was smart. I’d never even thought of that particular career before my ego and my insecurity combined to tell me that I should do it.

I got into the course, and got my qualification, but I’ve never been sure that it was a good decision – I’ve never really used it, and all it ended up giving me were a few more years at uni. In other words, I made a dumb decision because I wanted people to think I was smart. Better to be honest about what you’d really enjoy doing, and be good at.

Treat yourself

I’m not saying go out and rampage through every outlet at your nearest food court, but this is not the time to be imposing a rigorous new diet. I wouldn’t have made it through the HSC without regular splurges on chocolate and ice cream, but your rewards program can work in other ways, too – two hours of study might buy one more episode of an entertaining TV show, or whatever works.

Don’t worry – there are lots of pathways to where you want to go

These days, there are lots of ways to get into just about any field. Most programs are available at graduate level, for instance, and Melbourne Uni is pioneering a model where everybody does generalist degrees when they first leave school. What this means is that while a mark that exceeds your target will let you get into a certain course, not getting in this time around won’t permanently exclude you. It’s tempting to feel that school exams are an all-or-nothing scenario, but they really aren’t.

Or you might not know what you want to do, which seems scary but is really quite liberating – it’s OK to take a few years to find out.

Drink cups of tea

Coffee before an exam, perhaps, but I’ve always tended to drink a lake’s worth of herbal tea when I had to do a lot of studying or writing. Somehow, it’s very soothing. I particularly recommend peppermint or rooibos.

Find out about your heroes, and how they did at school

It’s hard to avoid the impression that your Year 12 mark matters immensely. Looking at the biography of just about anybody who you admire will show you that in fact, school results are a very minor thing in the context of most people’s lives. In terms of my heroes, very few hilarious comedians, great writers or excellent musicians did brilliantly at school, and even if they did, their marks didn’t particularly help them to become who they ended up being.

Get ready never to talk about your mark again

After the second week of uni, it becomes socially unacceptable to mention any high school accomplishment, and especially your mark – unless you do really well and the newspaper rings up 20 years later, I guess. You might put it on your first graduate job application, but you probably won’t ever again after that. A few decades on, even you will struggle to remember the number that right now means everything.

Good luck, and I hope you get the mark you want – but if it doesn’t work out that way, you’ll almost certainly still be absolutely fine. You may even be considerably better off if you avoid a course you don’t really want to do.

Regardless, in a few week’s time, you’ll never have to wear a school uniform again, and that fact alone makes it well worth saying – congratulations!

Dominic Knight is the NSW/ACT Evenings presenter on ABC Local Radio.
Article sourced from: http://www.abc.net.au/news/2015-10-12/knight-hsc-advice-from-someone-who-survived/6847466

How to Do a Kettlebell Swing

October 8, 2017

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“The kettlebell swing is the ultimate single exercise to improve strength, endurance, coordination, stability of the hips and core, and grip strength,” says Grant Anderson, co-owner and director of strength at Chicago Primal Gym. The move involves your whole body from start to finish, so it forces your cardiovascular and muscular systems to work together, which translates well to outdoor sports. And a set of swings is a total sufferfest, so you’re building some serious mental grit in the process.

“Many people are quad dominant,” says Noam Tamir, founder of TS Fitness in New York City. “Kettlebell swings fire up the hip-dominant muscles rather than the quads, which helps to bring balance to the body.” Translation: Your body will distribute weight and effort more equally, which is crucial if you want to prevent injury and maximize performance.

There are two types of basic kettlebell swings: the Russian version and the American version. You may have seen people doing the American swing in the gym or at a CrossFit box, where they swing the bell up and overhead, but this can be dangerous if you don’t know what you’re doing. “There isn’t much more gained from going overhead with the kettlebell, but there is a lot more risk,” says Tamir. Without proper mobility, this move can put pressure on the neck and possibly throw you out of alignment. The overhead position also makes it difficult not to go into hyperextension of the lower back, says Tamir, which could lead to injury. The Russian swing—where you stop swinging the bell upwards at eye-level and bring it back down—is your best bet: You’ll avoid injury and get the same physical payoffs.

Perfect the Basic Swing

If you’re brand new to the kettlebell, start with a 16-kilogram (35-pound) option; but if you have a little experience, use a 24-kilogram (53-pound) bell. That may sound heavy for your first swing, but going big can actually help you learn better technique and going too light can downgrade the impact of the exercise, says Anderson. “Doing swings with light bells is often counterproductive, because your upper body can easily take over the load,” he explains. This leaves your hips and hammies—the main targeted areas—out of the exercise.

Start by standing with your feet just wider than shoulder-width apart, toes turned slightly out and the kettlebell about a foot in front of you. Hinge your hips back so your chest and eyes are pointed toward the ground about five feet in front of you. Reach and grab the handle of the bell with an overhand grip, tilting the bell back toward you. Your shoulders are higher than your hips, and your hips higher than your knees. Sharply inhale through your nose as you hike the bell back between your legs, keeping it high above your knees. Sharply exhale through your mouth as you stand quickly, driving your feet into the ground and bracing your body in a “vertical plank,” squeezing your glutes and quads and bracing your abs. As you do, keep your arms straight and use the momentum of your hip thrust to bring the bell in front of your chest. Let the bell hang there around shoulder height for just a moment. Bring the bell back down toward hip height by hinging your hips back; repeat. Repeat in sets of five to ten reps.

Scale It Up

After you’ve learned the basic swing and progressed with heavier loads to the point where doing more than three or four swings feels very difficult, these variations will spice up your training so you continue to improve, says Tamir.

Single-Arm Swing

How It Helps: Focusing on a single arm forces you to practice grip strength and activates the smaller stabilizer muscles in your shoulder.

How to Do It: Set up the same way as you do for a double-arm swing, but grip the kettlebell with one hand. Line up the free hand parallel to the hand that’s gripping the kettlebell. When swinging the kettlebell backward between your legs, your free hand should mimic the movement pattern, parallel to the arm in use. Continue the hinge motion as you would if both your hands were on the bell.

Alternate KB Swings

How It Helps: This progression builds hand-eye coordination and teaches your muscles how to react quickly to changing demands.

How to Do It: Set up the same way as you do for the single-arm swing, but when the bell reaches shoulder height, transfer it to the other hand by placing the free hand over the working hand and quickly exchanging the kettlebell to the other hand during the floating phase. Continue the swing, switching hands at the top of each swing.

KB Clean

How It Helps: This exercise develops strength in the entire legs while working on muscle control during tighter, smaller movements.

How to Do It: Set up the same way as you do for the single-arm swing. As you hinge forward and bring the bell toward your chest, loosen your grip when the bell reaches your hips. Quickly tuck your elbow back toward your body so it touches your side and turn your palm inward so it’s facing your head. The bell should fall naturally over the top of your wrist. Return to the backswing by rotating your hand down toward the ground with the thumb facing your body and the pinkie facing away from you, keeping the kettlebell as close to your body as you can and swinging back through your legs.

Article sourced here: https://www.outsideonline.com/2243661/how-do-kettlebell-swing