Archive for the ‘Coffs Coast Health Club’ Category

Healthy Inspirations Recipe of the Week – Banana & Prune Muffins

October 19, 2017

banana-prune-muffins
Serves 4

Ingredients

2 Tbsp coconut oil
1 ripe banana
100g prunes, chopped
2 eggs
6 scoops Protein Powder Vanilla Cream
1/2 cup almond meal
2 Tbsp sour cream

Method

  1. Place melted coconut oil in a bowl. Add mashed banana and chopped prunes and mix.
  2. Add eggs and sour cream and mix well.
  3. Add Proti Powder and almond meal and mix to combine.
  4. Place in muffin pans and bake at 170 C for about 20 minutes, or until the tops are lightly browned.
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HSC advice from someone who survived

October 15, 2017

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It’s hard to avoid the impression that your Year 12 mark matters immensely. But remember, there are many pathways to where you want to go, and that number you think is all-important will eventually be forgotten, writes Dom Knight.

Today is the first day of the HSC, those three letters calculated to terrify Year 11 and 12 students and which I still can’t hear without experiencing flashbacks.

So, to all HSC and other Year 12 students, please allow me to offer you my sincerest condolenceswish you the very best of luck!

Talk to anyone who’s slogged through and obtained the NSW qualification, or the VCE or WACE or anything like it, and they’ll tell you that end-of-school exams are a uniquely cruel prank to play on 17-year-olds, especially when uni is never anything like as harrowing as the hoops you have to jump through to get there.

On the bright side, today is the first day of a few weeks of inconvenience you have to endure before getting on with the rest of your life, whatever that may entail. Which is hugely exciting.

Here are a few things that might help you transition from the ranks of those dreading their end-of-school exams to those delighted that they’ll never have to do them again.

Sleep

You’ll be tempted to stay up all night cramming, but that really isn’t a smart idea. You’ve been studying all year. You’ve done the trials. You almost certainly know everything you need to know already, and the honest truth is that exhaustion will probably hurt your performance more than stuffing your brain full of last-minute facts will benefit it. Worst of all, you might end up confusing yourself in your exhaustion.

Get a good pen

Boringly practical, I know – but if you’ve got a crappy biro, you’ll write less and your hand will cramp. Get one of those nifty rollerball pens where the ink flows freely without needing any pressure from your hand. I got ridiculous and bought a fountain pen because I thought it would let me write the most, but there’s no need to get that stupid unless you get a kick out of the idea. Oh, and get some spares, too.

Plan your essay answers

As a humanities guy, my HSC experience was full of 40 minute essays. Despite the temptation to start writing immediately, things always went better when I took a minute or two to work out some kind of logical structure.

Unfortunately HSC markers still don’t recognise listicles like this one, so you will need to construct some kind of an argument. Being ‘right’ or ‘wrong’ isn’t really a possibility – it’s all about trying to write convincingly.

Find a way to take your mind off it

In Year 12, I convinced myself that what I should do right before any exam was play Tetris on my monochrome Nintendo Game Boy, because it’s impossible to freak out about how maybe you’ve forgotten certain key characteristics of flowering plants when there are different-shaped blocks to stack to the sound of a mesmeric Russian folksong.

These days you probably have far more sophisticated games on your phone, but the point is the same – we benefit from taking our minds out of a stressful situation. Whether it’s having a bath, lying in the sun or going for a swim, having some brain downtime will help.

Know that courses with higher entry requirements aren’t necessarily better

At school, I had my heart set on a certain course because it was supposed to be prestigious, and I thought that if I got into it, everyone would think I was smart. I’d never even thought of that particular career before my ego and my insecurity combined to tell me that I should do it.

I got into the course, and got my qualification, but I’ve never been sure that it was a good decision – I’ve never really used it, and all it ended up giving me were a few more years at uni. In other words, I made a dumb decision because I wanted people to think I was smart. Better to be honest about what you’d really enjoy doing, and be good at.

Treat yourself

I’m not saying go out and rampage through every outlet at your nearest food court, but this is not the time to be imposing a rigorous new diet. I wouldn’t have made it through the HSC without regular splurges on chocolate and ice cream, but your rewards program can work in other ways, too – two hours of study might buy one more episode of an entertaining TV show, or whatever works.

Don’t worry – there are lots of pathways to where you want to go

These days, there are lots of ways to get into just about any field. Most programs are available at graduate level, for instance, and Melbourne Uni is pioneering a model where everybody does generalist degrees when they first leave school. What this means is that while a mark that exceeds your target will let you get into a certain course, not getting in this time around won’t permanently exclude you. It’s tempting to feel that school exams are an all-or-nothing scenario, but they really aren’t.

Or you might not know what you want to do, which seems scary but is really quite liberating – it’s OK to take a few years to find out.

Drink cups of tea

Coffee before an exam, perhaps, but I’ve always tended to drink a lake’s worth of herbal tea when I had to do a lot of studying or writing. Somehow, it’s very soothing. I particularly recommend peppermint or rooibos.

Find out about your heroes, and how they did at school

It’s hard to avoid the impression that your Year 12 mark matters immensely. Looking at the biography of just about anybody who you admire will show you that in fact, school results are a very minor thing in the context of most people’s lives. In terms of my heroes, very few hilarious comedians, great writers or excellent musicians did brilliantly at school, and even if they did, their marks didn’t particularly help them to become who they ended up being.

Get ready never to talk about your mark again

After the second week of uni, it becomes socially unacceptable to mention any high school accomplishment, and especially your mark – unless you do really well and the newspaper rings up 20 years later, I guess. You might put it on your first graduate job application, but you probably won’t ever again after that. A few decades on, even you will struggle to remember the number that right now means everything.

Good luck, and I hope you get the mark you want – but if it doesn’t work out that way, you’ll almost certainly still be absolutely fine. You may even be considerably better off if you avoid a course you don’t really want to do.

Regardless, in a few week’s time, you’ll never have to wear a school uniform again, and that fact alone makes it well worth saying – congratulations!

Dominic Knight is the NSW/ACT Evenings presenter on ABC Local Radio.
Article sourced from: http://www.abc.net.au/news/2015-10-12/knight-hsc-advice-from-someone-who-survived/6847466

How to Do a Kettlebell Swing

October 8, 2017

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“The kettlebell swing is the ultimate single exercise to improve strength, endurance, coordination, stability of the hips and core, and grip strength,” says Grant Anderson, co-owner and director of strength at Chicago Primal Gym. The move involves your whole body from start to finish, so it forces your cardiovascular and muscular systems to work together, which translates well to outdoor sports. And a set of swings is a total sufferfest, so you’re building some serious mental grit in the process.

“Many people are quad dominant,” says Noam Tamir, founder of TS Fitness in New York City. “Kettlebell swings fire up the hip-dominant muscles rather than the quads, which helps to bring balance to the body.” Translation: Your body will distribute weight and effort more equally, which is crucial if you want to prevent injury and maximize performance.

There are two types of basic kettlebell swings: the Russian version and the American version. You may have seen people doing the American swing in the gym or at a CrossFit box, where they swing the bell up and overhead, but this can be dangerous if you don’t know what you’re doing. “There isn’t much more gained from going overhead with the kettlebell, but there is a lot more risk,” says Tamir. Without proper mobility, this move can put pressure on the neck and possibly throw you out of alignment. The overhead position also makes it difficult not to go into hyperextension of the lower back, says Tamir, which could lead to injury. The Russian swing—where you stop swinging the bell upwards at eye-level and bring it back down—is your best bet: You’ll avoid injury and get the same physical payoffs.

Perfect the Basic Swing

If you’re brand new to the kettlebell, start with a 16-kilogram (35-pound) option; but if you have a little experience, use a 24-kilogram (53-pound) bell. That may sound heavy for your first swing, but going big can actually help you learn better technique and going too light can downgrade the impact of the exercise, says Anderson. “Doing swings with light bells is often counterproductive, because your upper body can easily take over the load,” he explains. This leaves your hips and hammies—the main targeted areas—out of the exercise.

Start by standing with your feet just wider than shoulder-width apart, toes turned slightly out and the kettlebell about a foot in front of you. Hinge your hips back so your chest and eyes are pointed toward the ground about five feet in front of you. Reach and grab the handle of the bell with an overhand grip, tilting the bell back toward you. Your shoulders are higher than your hips, and your hips higher than your knees. Sharply inhale through your nose as you hike the bell back between your legs, keeping it high above your knees. Sharply exhale through your mouth as you stand quickly, driving your feet into the ground and bracing your body in a “vertical plank,” squeezing your glutes and quads and bracing your abs. As you do, keep your arms straight and use the momentum of your hip thrust to bring the bell in front of your chest. Let the bell hang there around shoulder height for just a moment. Bring the bell back down toward hip height by hinging your hips back; repeat. Repeat in sets of five to ten reps.

Scale It Up

After you’ve learned the basic swing and progressed with heavier loads to the point where doing more than three or four swings feels very difficult, these variations will spice up your training so you continue to improve, says Tamir.

Single-Arm Swing

How It Helps: Focusing on a single arm forces you to practice grip strength and activates the smaller stabilizer muscles in your shoulder.

How to Do It: Set up the same way as you do for a double-arm swing, but grip the kettlebell with one hand. Line up the free hand parallel to the hand that’s gripping the kettlebell. When swinging the kettlebell backward between your legs, your free hand should mimic the movement pattern, parallel to the arm in use. Continue the hinge motion as you would if both your hands were on the bell.

Alternate KB Swings

How It Helps: This progression builds hand-eye coordination and teaches your muscles how to react quickly to changing demands.

How to Do It: Set up the same way as you do for the single-arm swing, but when the bell reaches shoulder height, transfer it to the other hand by placing the free hand over the working hand and quickly exchanging the kettlebell to the other hand during the floating phase. Continue the swing, switching hands at the top of each swing.

KB Clean

How It Helps: This exercise develops strength in the entire legs while working on muscle control during tighter, smaller movements.

How to Do It: Set up the same way as you do for the single-arm swing. As you hinge forward and bring the bell toward your chest, loosen your grip when the bell reaches your hips. Quickly tuck your elbow back toward your body so it touches your side and turn your palm inward so it’s facing your head. The bell should fall naturally over the top of your wrist. Return to the backswing by rotating your hand down toward the ground with the thumb facing your body and the pinkie facing away from you, keeping the kettlebell as close to your body as you can and swinging back through your legs.

Article sourced here: https://www.outsideonline.com/2243661/how-do-kettlebell-swing

Healthy Inspirations Recipe of the Week – Stuffed Calamari

October 5, 2017

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Suits all phases – Serves 4

Ingredients

4 large calamari, with tentacles
Olive oil
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 onion, finely chopped
1 red capsicum, chopped
150g kale, washed and chopped
2 Tbsp fresh parsley, finely chopped
1 tsp dried oregano
400g tomato puree
Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper

Method

  1. Separate the calamari tentacles from the bodies. Finely chop the tentacles, and set aside.
  2. Heat 1 Tbsp olive oil in a fry pan over medium heat and sauté the garlic and onions until the onion is softened.
  3. Add the capsicum and cook for 2 – 3 minutes. Add the chopped tentacles and cook for another 5 to 8 minutes.
  4. Add the kale and cook, stirring frequently, until the kale has softened; then remove the mixture from the heat.
  5. Fill up each calamari with an equal amount of the filling, and close them up with toothpicks.
  6. Heat another Tbsp olive oil over a medium-high heat in the same fry pan. Add the stuffed calamari to the skillet and brown all sides, about 2 minutes per side.
  7. Combine the remaining ingredients in a saucepan and bring to a boil. Lower the heat to a simmer, add the stuffed calamari, cover and cook for 35 to 40 minutes.
  8. Adjust the seasoning and serve with a salad or steamed vegies.

 

Coffs Coast Health Club eNews – October 2017

October 3, 2017

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1. Ever thought about becoming a Personal Trainer?

The Last Personal Trainer Course Intake for 2017 begins in October so this is your LAST CHANCE to make a change and live your dream. You can find out more about the Australian Institute of Personal Training by contacting Coffs Campus Manager Dan Tempest on 0432 579 221 or coffscoast@aipt.com.au

2. Did you know when you walk you are putting the force of as much as 5 times your body weight on each foot?
Our friends at Mid North Coast Physiotherapy will make sure your feet are functioning at their best with their GaitScan assessments. Find out more about GaitScan or book in for one of 20 FREE GaitScan assessments they are offering this month.

3. Save the Date!
Don’t forget to pop Saturday 9th of December into your diary for our annual Members and Family Christmas Party. More details to come as the date gets closer… Keep up to date with all Club & Community events by visiting our Events calendar.

4. Have you tried Kombucha?
We are excited to announce that we will be stocking the wonderful Gut Instinct Kombucha in both clubs! Learn about the benefits of Kombucha, and look out for Taste Tests happening throughout the month at your favourite club.

5. Win a Prize & a Workout Buddy:
We have a very special members only competition running for the month, with the chance to win a prize a week simply for referring your friends and family to try the club! Check out the calendar below to see the wonderful prizes! Simply see reception at your club to refer your friends and get your name in the draw! Keep an eye on our Facebook each Monday to see if you’re the lucky winner! Not a member yet? Join online now and SAVE!


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Healthy Inspirations Recipe of the Week – Tuna Dip

September 28, 2017

hi
Serves 4

½ protein | ½ fat

Ingredients

1 (180g) can tuna in oil, drained
½ small white onion, finely chopped
30g light Philly cream cheese
1 tsp lemon rind
2 tsp lemon juice
2 tsp capers
1 Tbsp chopped basil

Method

  1. Combine tuna, onion, cream cheese, lemon rind and lemon juice in a bowl. Add capers and basil and mix well.

Healthy Inspirations Recipe of the Week – Chicken Florentine

September 21, 2017

spinach

Pan-fried chicken served with garlic-flavoured spinach – it even looks healthy! Serves 4

Ingredients

¼ tsp pepper
500g chicken breasts or thighs, cut in half
1 Tbsp olive oil
500g fresh spinach, or 250g packet frozen spinach
3 Tbsp shredded basil
1 clove garlic, minced
80g grated parmesan

Method

  1. Sprinkle the pepper over each chicken piece. Place to the side.
  2. Heat a frying pan to medium and add the oil. Add chicken pieces and gently cook for 10 mins or until cooked through, turning once.
  3. Wash and drain fresh spinach, then place spinach, basil and garlic in a large saucepan with ¼ cup water and cook until spinach is wilted (approx 2 mins). Drain off excess liquid and toss with a fork.
  4. Place spinach on a serving plate and arrange chicken on top. Sprinkle with parmesan and serve immediately.

Healthy Inspirations Recipe of the Week – Creamy Mushrooms

September 14, 2017

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This could be a side dish or a topping for steak, but however you use it it’s fabulous. You could even cook some chicken into the mix to make a one-pot meal. Serves 4

Ingredients

2 Tbsp butter
2 onions, chopped
4 cloves garlic, minced
250g portobello mushrooms, chopped with tough portion of stems removed
250g button mushrooms, sliced
to taste, sea salt and freshly ground black pepper
¼ cup beef stock
½ cup coconut milk
1 Handful of fresh thyme leaves
2 spring onions, chopped

Method

  1. Heat a large skillet over a medium heat and add the butter. Stir-in the onions and garlic. Cook until they begin to brown, about 7 minutes.
  2. Add the mushrooms and season to taste with sea salt and freshly ground black pepper. Cook until moisture evaporates entirely.
  3. Add the stock as well and coconut milk and stir well to ensure that the flavours are dispersed evenly.
  4. Once the mushrooms have simmered for a few minutes, add the thyme leaves, spring onions and adjust the salt and pepper seasoning. Allow to sit on a low heat for a few more minutes so that it thickens.
  5. Serve with grilled steak and steamed veggies.

Healthy Inspirations Recipe of the Week – Low Carb Nachos

September 7, 2017

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Healthy Inspirations Recipe of the Week – Broccoli Soup with Pine Nuts

August 31, 2017

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Suits all phases – Serves 6

Ingredients

1 Tbsp olive oil
1 brown onion, finely chopped
2 cloves garlic, crushed
1kg broccoli, florets and stems, chopped
4 cups vegetable or chicken stock
1/3 cup pine nuts
Salt and pepper

Method

  1. Heat oil in a large saucepan over medium-low heat. Add onion and garlic. Cook for 8 to 10 minutes, stirring occasionally, or until soft.
  2. Add broccoli, stock and 2 cups water to pan. Cover and bring to the boil. Reduce heat to low and simmer, covered, for 15 to 20 minutes or until tender. Remove from heat.
  3. Meanwhile, heat a small frying pan over medium heat. Dry-fry pine nuts, stirring, for 3 to 4 minutes or until golden. Keep a close eye on these as they can burn quickly. Add to soup.
  4. Using a food processor or blender, process soup in batches until smooth. Season with salt and pepper.
  5. Return soup to pan. Stir over low heat for 8 minutes or until warmed through. Ladle into bowls and serve.