Archive for the ‘Sugar addiction’ Category

Kill your sugar cravings with these 7 foods

July 18, 2017

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So, you’ve ditched the sweet stuff. For the first few days you’re flying high on green veggies and avocado – feeling like a brand new you.

But then, your body starts to realise that you’ve taken away ALL the sugar! Your brain’s sugar craving hormones begin to have a sweet little meltdown and you find yourself longing for that morning muffin, muesli bar and after dinner treat (read: half a pack of biscuits!).

If this sounds all too familiar, don’t sweat it. You’re not alone! We’ve all felt overwhelmed by our sugar cravings at some point (yes, even us) so here are some of the best sugar craving busters we’ve discovered at IQS.

1. Coconut oil.

This is a tried-and-tested trick in the IQS repertoire. “After lunch I still get sweet, ‘I need something more’ cravings,” says Sarah. “So this is my fail-proof trick. I eat two tablespoons of coconut oil. It satisfies my need for something sweet and KILLS appetite for about four to five hours.”

2. Liquorice tea.

The IQS team must literally sweat liquorice tea – we’re all drinking it! With the most amazing sweet aftertaste, you’ll have a hard time believing that it’s naturally sugar-free (unlike the liquorice sweets you can buy).

3. Sweet potato.

Sweet potato (or kumara) is one of the most delicious foods on this planet – fact. The very small amount of sugar will satisfy your cravings, while the starch stops you from overdoing it. Oh, and did we mention that sweet potatoes are ridiculously good for you?

4. Carrot sticks.

Carrots are another sweet veggie with lots of fibre to fill you up. Keep an emergency box of carrot sticks in the fridge, ready to be dipped into guacamole or hummus when the cravings strike.

5. Kombucha.

One of the things people miss most when they quit sugar is soft drinks. We suggest you skip the crappy diet pop and go for 100ml of gut-lovin’ kombucha when you need a fizzy hit. Just make sure it’s a low-sugar brand (we prefer it to be around 1g of sugar per 100ml).

6. Nut butter.

Nuts are full of good fats and proteins, making them perfect for sugar cravings. Almonds and cashews are naturally sweet, too. (Hot tip: if you make your own nut butter, add a heaped teaspoon of cinnamon to the mix to make the most delicious thing you’ve ever tasted.)

7. 85 per cent dark chocolate.

While you’ll have to give up your Twix bars, there’s nothing wrong with a little good quality cacao. A 100g block of 85 per cent dark chocolate has just over a teaspoon of sugar (not that you could finish a whole block!). To take it even further, try a 90 per cent dark chocolate. So good.

We originally published this post in June 2016. We updated it in June 2017.
Source here: https://iquitsugar.com/food-kill-sugar-cravings

Which Is Worse: High Fructose Corn Syrup Or Sugar?

March 1, 2015

VBK-SUGAR_260868fWhile both sweeteners really aren’t great, high fructose corn syrup, which is found in a wide variety of highly processed foods and beverages such as baked desserts, salad dressings, ketchup, sodas, and ice cream, is the slightly more dangerous choice.

Too much of any sugar is bad for you—in excess, it promotes insulin resistance, weight gain, and inflammation that contributes to chronic illnesses like heart disease and cancer. From a health perspective, some experts say HFCS (which is, obviously, derived from corn) is no different than table sugar (which comes from sugar cane and sugar beets), but there’s one difference between highly-processed HFCS and regular sugar that gives me pause: Some forms of HFCS may release more fructose within the body than does sucrose, or table sugar (which pales equal parts glucose and fructose). Glucose triggers feeling of fullness to help keep you from overeating, while fructose doesn’t.

Worse: a recent study in the Journal of Nutrition found that HFCS is significantly more toxic to female mice than table sugar is, harming their reproductive health and shortening their lifespan. Other animal studies suggest that high intakes of HFCS can slow brain function, impairing memory and the ability to learn.

There is also an environmental impact to consider, as the government-subsidized growing of corn requires large amounts of fertilizer and pesticides, and depletes the soil of nutrients.

Though some manufacturers, like Hershey, are doing away with HFCS in favor of ordinary table sugar, many still favor HFCS because it tastes sweeter than regular corn syrup, helps maintain a long shelf life for their products, and, until recently, has been relatively inexpensive. But there are better, healthier ways to add flavor, like a splash of maple or glucose syrup or adding vanilla or cinnamon.

Regular sugar can add to the pleasure of eating in small doses, but we consume far too much of it. In fact, the average American consumes 22 teaspoons of sugar daily, most of that coming from sugar-sweetened sodas, grain-based desserts such as cookies and cake, candy, energy drinks, ready-to-eat cereals, and yeast breads. So when you’re reaching for a snack, read ingredient lists carefully to avoid added sugars as much as possible. Or stick with naturally low-sugar options like air-popped popcorn, plain Greek yogurt, sorbet, and dried fruit.

Article sourced from: http://www.prevention.com/food/high-fructose-corn-syrup-versus-sugar
Written by Andrew Weil MD