Archive for October, 2015

Healthy Inspirations Recipe of the Week – Mushroom & Bacon Risotto

October 29, 2015

hi1 hi

Advertisements

Over 50’s Fitness by Glen Barnett – Flab to Fab Arms

October 27, 2015

Recently my wife was asked If we could write an article on an area that women of all ages find very frustrating – getting those upper arms from flab to fab!

Most women tend think to reduce the flab, they’ve got to lose the fat only and lose fat by doing cardiovascular exercise such as walking, running etc.    Wrong!  Yes Cardiovascular exercise is important but adding muscle (or increasing the density of your muscle) is a sure fire way to increase your metabolic rate which in turn will burn more energy (fat storage) during and after you exercise.

Incorporate a series of arm exercises into a single workout so to challenge the muscles and so that brushing your hair the next day may be a bit of an effort.  Some exercise examples are pushups, tricep extensions, krank cycle, dips etc.   Whatever you can do and use to work those arms 2-3 times a week and while you’re at it, look at your diet.

Getting those arms you want really comes down to making some changes to your exercise program and making some changes to your diet.    Check the carbohydrates (sugars) in your diet. High carbohydrate diets are essentially fat storing diets (unless you’re an athlete). High carbohydrate snacks and meals cause your body to release more insulin than you probably need, resulting in extra carbohydrates stored as body fat.   There are so many hidden sugars in foods  we don’t even realise how addicted we are, so when reducing your carbohydrate intake do so over a 3-6 week period to help with cravings.  Your body will start using energy stores from your body fat more efficiently.

As an added suggestion make sure you also exfoliate your arms and use a good rich oil blend like grapefruit, marjoram, geranium and black pepper to nourish the skin.  Start now and by Christmas when you wave good bye to the relations hopefully your arms won’t wave goodbye with you.

You should always get more guidance when you’re doing unfamiliar exercises so give Glen or Jacqui a call at Coffs Coast Health Club and we can organise you a free session – 66586222.

But I Thought All Yoga Was Therapeutic?

October 25, 2015

On the intelligence of varied movement.

Yoga practice, tree concept for your design

As we were moving slowly and consciously through a series of poses in a yoga therapy session last week, a 69-year-old client of mine who had practiced asana off and on for 40 years noted the difference between yoga therapy and the typical group classes she’d been to in the past, exclaiming, “No wonder I don’t attend classes anymore! It doesn’t make sense for me to do what they are doing. And I thought all yoga was therapeutic!”

What we came to understand in her session was that many of the poses, instructions, and approaches to fitness that she was encountering in her local yoga classes were aggravating her conditions rather than alleviating them. Was this just because she was no longer 25? Not at all—I’ve seen the same kind of overuse and repetitive strain in people in their twenties, and even in teenagers. But for some reason, it’s a common belief that yoga is exempt from the rules of cross-training and diversity of movement.

Injury has now become so much a part of yoga practice that it is widely accepted as inevitable. I recently came across a Facebook post written by a self-described “yoga teacher/mentor” this week that illustrates this prevalence perfectly. Her words (directed to her students) were, to this effect: “We’ve been through so much together, so many changes. I’ve seen some of you become mothers, others retire, we’ve ripped hamstrings and blown shoulders…” My mouth fell open. Since when are torn hamstrings and injured shoulders a normal, accepted part of the yoga experience? Memorable, yes, but something to look back on with nostalgia?? Somehow I don’t think that sages of yoga would agree, since yogis ascribe to the same rule of ahimsa as do medical doctors—first, do no harm.

Injury has now become so much a part of yoga practice that it is widely accepted as inevitable.

More and more, doctors are offering referrals to yoga classes, and teachers and students alike must be aware of what that means. Within the medical community, there is a growing sense of trust in yoga and in yoga teachers. My classes at a hospital, and my private lessons and therapy sessions, were full of doctors, nurses, physical and occupational therapists, and their families. Many of these medical professionals even chose to go through yoga teacher training programs so that they would have new options to offer their patients.

The issue is that to most people, a “yoga class” means a “follow the leader,” and includes the same 20 or so poses in every class. Some of them might feel good, like the reclining bent-knee-over-straight-leg twist that makes your back pop every time. This type of twist is actually destabilizing for your lumbar joints and can lead to later arthritis or sciatic nerve issues. Is it really worth it then? And while it may be momentarily empowering to kick up into headstand so you can say “I got that pose,” what about the nagging neck pain the next morning? Or maybe you love the achievement of full lotus but are noticing knee pain. Thankfully, there are other poses out there—poses that may make you stronger and more flexible. But discovering those poses takes time and demands attention to the specific needs of your body.

To see why a “one-size-fits-all” approach to yoga can be problematic, let’s look at the outline of a standard yoga class. A standard yoga class starts with some kind of warm-up. This, in my opinion, is the most important part of the class. Exploring your tightness du jour, breathing into a more supple ease in the morning, or de-stressing at the end of the day is why most students say they come to class. If left to our own devices, many of us might choose to spend anywhere from 20 minutes to an entire class doing cat/cow variations and all the core work and delicious hamstring and shoulder stretches we want. But the next thing we know, we are up and into sun salutes (or a comparable vinyasa) because the fitness class model demands that unless we sweat, we aren’t “doing yoga.”

In my private work, more than three-fourths of my diverse clients are unable to benefit their current physical state very much by doing “sun salutes” as they know them. Their backs are rounded in forward folds, their knees locked in downward dog, and their heads flung back as they grasp for backbends by straining upward. A chaturanga is a belly flop with shoulders wailing in misery, and stepping forward from downdog is an arduous and pretty embarrassing process. They hate these sun salutes but have done them religiously—thinking they were required in yoga practice and therefore must be good for them. With new or untrained teachers especially, sun salutes often take up a good amount of class time, as they may not be aware of other ways to generate heat.

In my private work, more than three-fourths of my diverse clients are unable to benefit their current physical state very much by doing “sun salutes” as they know them.

Next comes standing poses. Despite the fact that even students who have practiced for years have alignment epiphanies when they raise the surface at which they practice, in your average class, modifications with a chair or other high surface are almost never offered for standing postures like triangle. If the agile teacher and the other students are using no props, it could be embarrassing to pull out a chair—especially if the student is young, or older but wanting to appear strong and healthy.

After a few standing poses, many yoga classes include some sort of inversion, often much too difficult for those lacking core and arm strength. More experienced teachers will give some helpful modifications, since falling out of an upside-down pose can look pretty scary (as are lawsuits). Poses like legs-up-the-wall (or legs-up-a-chair) are wonderful, accessible inversions. And for those with more arm strength, a handstand or forearm balance is actually less risky than a headstand or unsupported neck-smashing shoulderstand. But even so, practitioners often eschew the simple poses in favor of more dramatic or “classical” postures. While inversions can be very beneficial for the body and mood, keeping your head and neck safe is an essential part of the practice!

The backbending part of class is excellent for many people, and a well-aligned bridge or locust can be quite strengthening. But when the other students start jamming stiff arms into full cobras, or teachers lift students into full wheels so that everyone “gets there,” many practitioners feel pressured to do things for which their own bodies will suffer (both now and later).

Twists can be the most subtle and luscious of asanas when approached in an informed and exploratory fashion. But a ”get it done” mentality takes much of the sweetness out of the twist. Going for a popping “adjustment” or squeezing excessively to “wring out toxins” promotes an aggressive approach to the spinal movement. In actuality, it is the breath that promotes the “detox,” not the twists “flushing the organs with new blood.” Of course, gentle twisting can help to calm the nervous system and keep the spine mobile. Popping is not always a good thing, though, and may set you up for joint problems down the line.

In many classes, there tends to be a similar approach to forward folds, which should be calming, soothing, strengthening, and lengthening poses. The “If you are more flexible, do ____” cue becomes a punishment to those whose natural suppleness (or lack thereof) may not meet their own expectations. They begin pulling and tugging themselves forward with rounded lumbar spines. When you consider the sitting that most of us do all day, why would collapsing and squeezing our spinal discs be a good plan?

Along the same lines, you’ll probably also find the ubiquitous “hip opener” in most classes. These are beneficial to a degree and may feel good to tightly clenched buttocks—but when overpracticed without good core strength and a countering squeeze from the outer thighs, they can cause instability of the hip joint. My motto is “Don’t feed the pigeon,” especially if it’s a fat spacious pigeon with way too much entitlement. In other words, if the pose feels too easy, the student needs to strengthen the muscles around the joint rather than increase a passive stretch. Loosen what’s too tight, tighten what’s too loose.

Along with warm-ups, shavasana relaxation has the opportunity to be a particularly healing part of yoga class, especially when attention is given to diaphragmatic breathing. In fact, some really great teachers add a sprinkling of “stop, breathe, and pay attention” practice throughout their classes, or start class with a centering resting pose. It is in the moments of resting that our minds and bodies download what we have practiced. Without the stopping and resting, the autonomic nervous system can’t assimilate the deeper benefits. Conscious rest provides a training ground for keeping us calm in all of life’s stressful situations.

What I’m talking about is yoga as a healing modality—not just for weight loss or “detox,” or to firm buttocks or perform impressive postures. I had one yoga therapy client who really understood the difference. She said, “I am here for the therapy, the process that happens in the breath and mind and body. I also do fitness yoga, a vigorous power flow, because I don’t like running!” She practiced yoga as therapy, along with yoga as fitness, and did not confuse the two.

If a healthy person with a clear mind and good joints and muscles takes vigorous classes to stay fit, good for them. But they need to vary their movements and be aware of the pitfalls of some repetitive actions too. A repetitive strain injury (RSI)like carpal tunnel syndrome is an “injury to the musculoskeletal and nervous systems that may be caused by repetitive tasks, forceful exertions, vibrations, mechanical compression, or sustained or awkward positions.” How many awkward positions do we assume repeatedly in yoga classes, especially in vinyasa? (Think weight supported on hands, neck thrust back.) How many times per week? Or if you are a teacher, how many times per day?

If you are unsure about how to practice therapeutically, it may be good to visit a well-recommended yoga therapist or experienced teacher who can map out some areas where you need strength practices, and others where you need to focus on flexibility. Consulting with the International Association of Yoga Therapists (IAYT) for trained therapists in your area may be helpful. Most importantly, a trained professional can observe how you breathe during yoga and help you to modify the speed and intensity of your practice accordingly. This type of help will give the prospective or long-term yogi more confidence in how to practice in general. Remember, the poses and breathing techniques we choose to practice may lower pain levels and help with range of motion, but it’s how we practice them that can change our lives.

I’m not offering these thoughts to frighten students or keep them away from classes they love. But how many times must we ignore the pinches we feel around the tops of our thighbones, or the lower back twinges in straight-leg forward folds? How many times must we continue to lower to chaturanga when it hurts our shoulders? When we “do it anyway” (just like going for a third cocktail or chocolate pie bender), we will pay for it sooner or later.

If you attend classes because you love them, consider trying the simpler “beginner’s” options for awhile. Go to your knees in plank pose, or skip the deep backbends even if you think you can do them—then add gradually from there. Ask yourself: Is this uncomfortable? Is my breath ragged? Am I stressed or anxious when I try this? If a teacher pushes you to ever-harder movements that result in pain, or won’t let you modify a pose, look for a new class.

If a teacher pushes you to ever-harder movements that result in pain, or won’t let you modify a pose, look for a new class.

My personal preference is to let my yoga be sweet yoga, and take a long walk (with attention to alignment!) if I want fitness. My “sweet” practice includes different strong asana every day, along with plenty of TLC. My body has been at this awhile and rewires well with some intense focused poses; this may be the case for you as well.

The home remedy I suggest for anyone is to be more playful in your practice—to breathe and stretch in joyful ways that generate a sense of openness in your body. Historically, before the development of asana as we know it, yogis simply moved to link the circuits in their energetic systems. They would then “breathe life” into these shapes. In fact, Tandava (Indian sacred dance) and Qigong both evolved out of playful, wise, joyful movement combined with breath.

Start on the floor on your belly or back and just see what your breath is doing; then move your way into cat-like stretches—not necessarily a yoga pose, but stretching to feel better and to connect with deeper breathing into tight areas. And when you discover the yoga postures that give you space, allow you to breathe deeper “into” constricted areas of your body, and leave you feeling refreshed, practice them! Practice them in a spirit of exploration.

Swami Rama of the Himalayas, a spiritual scientist and remarkable scholar of the mind/body connection, likewise encouraged his students to be like scientists in exploring the body and energetic system. But no good laboratory research is done without variables or by allowing oneself to damage the equipment. Explore and learn your strengths and weaknesses, and vary what you are doing physically. Only a mad scientist does the same thing over and over and expects a different result.

Article sourced here:  https://yogainternational.com/article/view/but-i-thought-all-yoga-was-therapeutic?utm_content=bufferd420f&utm_medium=social&utm_source=facebook.com&utm_campaign=buffer
Written by:   BETH SPINDLER

Healthy Inspirations Recipe of the Week – Chicken with Coconut Curry Coating

October 22, 2015

hi

The Science Behind Giving

October 20, 2015

Why People Give?

brain“Behavioural insight research shows that when it comes to charitable giving the public are often ruled by their heart, not their head.”  Photograph: Peter Bowater/Alamy

There are several questions that have fascinated behavioural scientists for decades: why do people ignore information that is right in front of us? Why do we seem to care so little about our long-term futures? And why do we give money to charity? Behavioural science can help us to unpack the question further.

Researchers have looked into why people donate, why they don’t do it as much as they would hope to and how to bridge this gap. The explanations for charitable giving fall into three broad categories, from the purely altruistic – I donate because I value the social good done by the charity. The “impurely” altruistic – I donate because I extract value from knowing I contribute to the social good for the charity. And the the not-at-all altruistic – I donate because I want to show off to potential mates how rich I am.

But are these motives strong enough to enable people to donate as much as they would want to? Most people support charities in one way or another, but often we struggle to make donations as often as we think we should. Although many people would like to leave a gift to charity in their will, they forget about it when the time comes. Our research shows (pdf) that if the will-writer just asks someone if they would like to donate, they are more likely to consider it and the rate of donation roughly doubles.

Hearts over heads

Many people are also aware that they should donate to the causes that have the highest impact, but facts and figures are less attractive than narratives. In a series of experiments, it was found that people are much more responsive to charitable pleas that feature a single, identifiable beneficiary, than they are to statistical information about the scale of the problem being faced. Further work also discovered that advertising which emphasises the proven effectiveness of the charity does not increase giving. Other evidence suggests that the effect of this information can actually be the opposite . In short, when it comes to charitable giving, we are often ruled by our hearts and not our heads.

Influenced by others

Another of the major takeaways from the research in this area is that giving is fundamentally a social act. One study shows that people give significantly more to their university if the person calling and asking for their donation is their former roommate. Researchers found that when JustGiving donors see that the donor before them has made a large donation, they make a larger donation themselves .

It’s not just out friends and families who can influence us. Donors to an international development charity were more likely to respond to a match–funding campaign if they knew that that the match came from the Bill and Melinda Gates foundation than if it came from an anonymous source. In our own research working with a large employer and Marie Curie, we have found that celebrity supporters increase donations to charity, and fast – but that this only appears to work for people who have donated to the charity before.

Giving is contagious

The good news is that charitable giving is contagious – seeing others give makes an individual more likely to give and gentle encouragement from a prominent person in your life can make also make a big difference to your donation decisions – more than quadrupling them in our recent study. Habit also plays a part – in three recent experiments those who volunteered before were more likely to donate their time than those who had not volunteered before.

In summary, behavioural science identifies a range of factors that influence our donations, and can help us to keep giving in the longer term. This is great news not just for charities, but also for donors. Research has revealed that spending money on others actually makes us happier than spending it on ourselves, and giving to others can actually make us healthier. So what are we waiting for?

Above Article Sourced Here: http://www.theguardian.com/voluntary-sector-network/2015/mar/23/the-science-behind-why-people-give-money-to-charity

GIVE

What Can I Give?

Last night, I was at a charitable event on Wall Street. I watched as the people who create money from their brains gave incredibly generous amounts for a great cause. The charity event was for Matt’s Promise, a 10-year-old nonprofit determined to wipe out Duchenne’s muscular dystrophy, a disease which kills young boys before they reach the age of 20.

In 10 short years, this dedicated organization of volunteers together with their partners at Charley’s Fund has directed over $25 million into scientific research resulting in promising new therapies that may save the lives of those living with this disease. Sure the auction items and amounts paid were impressive, but what really inspired me during the evening were the stories of how people had given so much more beyond money.

This motivated team through this partnership has been using their combined time, influence, talents and smarts to help launch the Race To Yes campaign, a critical effort to accelerate the FDA drug approval process. Such a task is herculean and can not be accomplished with money alone. With the right help they may even wipe out this disease in their next decade.

We’re used to charitable organizations asking us to “give and give generously.” Most people think they are referring to money–and no doubt that any nonprofit can make use of cash donations. But not everyone has the extra cash available to give until it hurts. Many people want to be charitable, but with the costs of starting a business or raising a family, not everyone can spare the money to help make a difference. Fortunately, there are plenty of opportunities to give value in other ways.

1. Give time.

Even people driving a startup company can find an hour or two to dedicate to a cause. I know companies that pool committed hours from employees so they can offer blocks of time to a worthy cause. In one year, a team of 20 people offering two hours a month can add up to 480 hours of energetic time for a need. It might be just enough to make the difference.

2. Give in-kind.

You might not have money, but you have supplies, skills, and products people want. Reach out to the director of a nonprofit you like and find out what the organization can use to carry out its mission. Often it can be something simple you can offer. If you are a catering company, you might offer food or serving ware. If you do custom printing, you might help with napkins or bookmarks. Get creative. Matt’s Promise has benefited from filmmakers who create awareness for Duchenne’s M.D. through art. Many nonprofits thrive on these in-kind exchanges.

3. Give space.

Young underfunded nonprofits often need a home. Your business could be a headquarters, or at least a regular meeting place, for their worthwhile activity. It could be the use of your parking lot, conference room, or even just a cubicle in your office. You can even provide nonphysical space. It could be space on your blog or newsletter to promote the organization or upcoming event. Take stock of the space you have that could easily be valuable to others and share.

4. Give expertise.

As a successful businessperson, you have great experience to share. Many of the folks working at charities are smart and capable, but they are juggling their volunteer work with all of their other responsibilities, and trying to educate themselves in fields that may be completely new. They can benefit from a fresh perspective and new insights. So if you have a solid grasp of finance, marketing, graphics, management, design, or any other professional subject that they can put to use, offer to make yourself available for questions or consultation. Feel free to set reasonable limits on time.

5. Give access.

6. Give an ear.

Nonprofit and charity work is frequently difficult, exhausting, and thankless. Even if what the organization is doing is fascinating, necessary, and world-changing, the volunteers will often feel worn-out and unappreciated. Sometimes, they just need someone willing to listen to the frustrations and difficulties they encounter. A little sympathy goes a long way. At the very least, you can afford to buy them a beer and listen when they talk. When they’re done, tell them you understand and you admire and appreciate their efforts.

The Above Article Sourced Here; http://www.inc.com/kevin-daum/how-generous-people-give-more-than-money.html

Can You Get Too Much Protein?

October 18, 2015

too-much-meat

Can you get too much protein? Good question. With M&F and your gym buddies preaching the minimum of 1 gram per pound of bodyweight and a lot of mainstream media talking about the dangers of that standard, things can get a bit confusing. This two-part series, presented in easy-to-follow Q&A format, should help assuage your fears.

Q: This sounds stupid, but what is protein?

 A: Proteins are large molecules made up of chains of smaller molecules called amino acids. There are 20 different amino acids the body uses to make protein, and when you eat protein, your body breaks apart the aminos and sends them to whichever part of your body needs whichever type of amino.

Protein in general is an extremely important nutrient, and not just because you like big muscles. “In all cells of the body, proteins perform crucial functions and are present in numerous forms,” says Tabatha Elliott, PhD, who has studied protein extensively at the University of Texas Medical Branch (Galveston). “Proteins form structural tissue [such as muscle fibers], blood plasma, enzymes, hormones, antibodies, hemoglobin, you name it.” Protein is also responsible for a host of other things, from making your muscles move to transporting other substances (such as vitamins and minerals) throughout your body. Without it, you would be practically unable to function.

In fact, people who don’t eat enough protein suffer a host of problems, namely wasting, where the body basically attempts to feed the protein hunger by breaking down muscles and other organs. Protein deficiency isn’t often a concern in meat-loving America, and it certainly isn’t a risk among those who follow a well-planned bodybuilding diet. Rather, mainstream nutritionists worry about the opposite “problem”: the health effects of eating too much protein.

Q: SO EXACTLY HOW MUCH IS TOO MUCH? WHAT ARE THE GUIDELINES FOR PROTEIN?

A: There are a lot of ways to determine how much protein the average person should eat to remain healthy. It can get really complicated, so we’ll spare you the details and just tell you that, according to the FNB, the Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA) of protein is 0.8 gram per kilogram of bodyweight per day. That translates to roughly 0.4 gram of protein per pound of bodyweight for men and women ages 19—70. Sounds awfully low, doesn’t it?

 It gets worse. You’ll sometimes see the RDA for protein listed as 56 grams per day for men. This number was derived based on a bodyweight of 154 pounds for the average male. Anyone see a problem with that?

Q: MOST BODYBUILDERS WEIGH IN AT A LOT MORE THAN 154 POUNDS, DON’T THEY?

A: Exactly. The recommendations applied to the general public just don’t apply to bodybuilders who eat specialized diets and live radically different lifestyles than the average person. Occasionally, a nutritionist who’s more enlightened about the dietary needs of trained individuals will recommend around 0.8 gram of protein per pound of bodyweight per day.

That more realistic number comes primarily from the work of Dr. Peter Lemon, who reviewed research about protein intake and athletes’ dietary needs and concluded, in a paper published in the International Journal of Sport Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism in 1998, that “dietary protein need increases with rigorous physical exercise.” The American College of Sports Medicine backs that recommendation, and it actually comes closer to the M&F-approved minimum recommendation of 1 gram of protein per pound of bodyweight per day. Then again, we wouldn’t argue if you wanted to eat up to 2 grams per pound.

Q: IS TOO MUCH PROTEIN HARMFUL? IF NOT, WHAT IS EVERYONE SO WORRIED ABOUT?

A: That’s a really good question, for one main reason. There’s yet another recommendation the FNB releases: the Tolerable Upper Intake Level (UL), the amount of something you can ingest before experiencing negative results (anything from nausea to toxicity, or poisoning). However, and this is important, there is no UL established for protein. Why? Because, as the FNB reports, “There was insufficient data to provide dose-response relationships to establish a Tolerable Upper Intake Level (UL) for total protein or for any of the amino acids.” See that? They had no proof that eating more protein caused any problems. Dr. Lemon said something similar in the same review we quoted above: “Despite the frequently expressed concern about adverse effects of high protein intake, there is no evidence that protein intakes in the range suggested will have adverse effects in healthy individuals.”

 Since you asked, though, we’ll tell you why mainstream nutritionists have their boxers in a bunch. First of all, remember that they aren’t talking to you, the muscle & fitness reader; they’re concerned about the majority of Americans who spend much of their days sitting at desks, on subways or in cars, then sitting in front of the TV for the rest of the night. That’s an awful lot of sitting. For those people, consuming excess protein is just like consuming an excess of anything. Protein contains 4 calories per gram. If you eat too many calories, you’re going to gain weight, so a primary concern for nutritionists about so-called excessive protein intake is that it could result in obesity.

Then maybe your next question is something like: Great, so I have to worry about getting fat if I take a week off from training? Not exactly. The more muscle you have, the more protein you’ll use and the more calories you’ll burn overall. Plus, there’s a reason why we tell you to eat lean protein such as chicken and turkey breasts and top sirloin.

Q: WHY DOES M&F RECOMMEND SUCH COMPARATIVELY HIGH AMOUNTS OF PROTEIN?

A: We have a lot of reasons, but probably the most important one is this: It works to give you the physique you’re looking for. “Muscle growth happens when protein synthesis exceeds protein breakdown,” Elliott says. “The availability of protein plays an important role in that process, so it follows that increased amino acid availability—such as what is provided by the intake of dietary protein—will result in a greater anabolic response.”

It has been proven that the more protein you eat, the more protein synthesis occurs in your muscles. In a study published in The Journal of Physiology in 2003, researchers found that subjects who had been given an infusion of amino acidsexperienced a boost in muscle protein synthesis. No surprise, right? The amazing thing was that the rate at which subjects built muscle protein increased as the amount of protein in their bloodstreams increased. Therefore, the more protein you eat, to a degree, the more muscle you’ll build—all day long, with or without exercise.

We have other reasons for our recommendations, too. One of them is pretty basic: You’re most likely taking supplements (branched-chain amino acids, beta-ecdysterone) that boost protein synthesis, but if you don’t have a well of protein for your muscles to draw on, those supplements aren’t going to do much. Another reason is because there’s evidence that eating protein can keep you lean. For one thing, it’s the hardest macronutrient for your body to digest, which means your body has to use more energy (calories) to break it down. Protein also increases the amount of a hunger-blunting peptide called PYY in your bloodstream, meaning you won’t be hankering for munchies soon after eating a high-protein meal.

Yet another reason for our protein recommendations is more complicated, but no less rational. In fact, it’s all about ratios. In addition to deciding the RDA for nutrients, the FNB recently established what it calls the Acceptable Macronutrient Distribution Range (AMDR) for protein, carbohydrates and fat to tell us what percentage of our calories should come from each. The AMDR for protein is between 10% and 35% of total calories. Now, to support the kind of body you’re boasting (or looking to build), you have to put down a lot of calories.

Our advice is generally that a 180-pound guy should eat 18 calories per pound of bodyweight per day, or about 3,240 calories. And that’s just to maintain his mass. So let’s do the math: Thirty-five percent of 3,240 is 1,134 calories of protein; divide that by 4 (the number of calories in a gram of protein), and you get 284 grams of protein per day. Divide that by our example’s bodyweight (180), and you get 1.6 grams of protein per pound of bodyweight per day.

It just goes to show that bodybuilders generally eat within the FNB’s acceptable range; it’s the FNB that’s not familiar with how much food bodybuilders need. Because you consume way more calories (sometimes almost twice the requirement of the average couch-sitter) per day, you have to eat that much more protein. Otherwise, as we discovered by doing more math, you’d be in for an equally fat gut. We plugged in the numbers to see what our 180-pound bodybuilder would be eating if he stuck with the RDA for protein and ate only 0.8 gram of protein per pound of bodyweight per day. Since he’d be eating only 144 grams of protein, he’d have to fill his plate with something else—like, oh, 500 grams of carbs. Needless to say, that’s more than his body could use for energy, so all the excess would head straight for his fat stores.

Q: DIDN’T I HEAR SOMETHING ABOUT KIDNEY DAMAGE OCCURRING FROM TOO MUCH PROTEIN?

A: “The breakdown of amino acids results in the formation of ammonia,” Elliott says. “The ammonia is then converted to less harmful urea in the liver and is then passed through the kidneys and excreted in urine.” Because it’s the job of the kidneys to take away any excess protein that your body’s not using, mainstream nutritionists worry that eating excess protein could tax your kidneys. However, several studies have shown that this just isn’t the case. One study, presented at the International Society of Sports Nutrition’s annual conference in 2005, examined the diets of 77 resistance-trained males and then tested their blood for various markers of kidney health. The subjects ate about 0.8 gram of protein per pound of bodyweight per day, and their kidneys were in perfect health. Another study, conducted at the Free University of Brussels (Belgium), found similar results for people consuming roughly 1.3 grams of protein per pound. There is very strong evidence that athletes taking in more protein are actually using that protein, either to build muscle or to burn as fuel.

Q: WHAT ABOUT MY BONES? CAN’T HIGH PROTEIN INTAKE MAKE THEM BRITTLE?

A: Some studies have shown that high amounts of protein in the diet can increase the amount of calcium the body excretes, which could potentially lead to fractures and osteoporosis, but those studies mostly involved purified protein and not whole-food protein sources such as meat. “But I drink three protein shakes a day,” you say, panicking.

“Isn’t that purified protein?” We hear you. But the fact that you also eat whole-food protein sources such as chicken and steak should provide you with enough calcium-protecting phosphorous and other nutrients. That was the finding of one study published in the Journal of Nutrition in 2003. Subjects were fed either a high-meat or a low-meat diet for eight weeks, and researchers found no difference in calcium excretion between the groups.

Still worried? A study at Warsaw Agricultural University (Poland) showed that a high-protein diet in rats actually increased bone mineralization, meaning the rats that ate more protein had stronger bones. Keep in mind that resistance exercise is one of the best ways to keep your bones strong.

So if you ever wonder whether the fit and prim woman at a neighboring table is gaping at your 18-inch arms or at the 18-inch steak on your plate, remember that although we may look like rebels, you can trust us. Everything we write is either backed by extensive scientific research or even more extensive anecdotal evidence. Plus, we practice what we preach, so that we can bring you the most up-to-date, trustworthy advice and you can build the most ferociously muscled body possible. To do that, you have to keep your protein intake on par: Consume at least 1 gram per pound of bodyweight per day of quality lean protein, and drink protein shakes around workout time to make your muscles—and the rest of you—happy.

Healthy Inspirations Recipe of the Week – Greek-Style Slow-Roasted Beef

October 15, 2015

hi

Over 50’s Fitness by Glen Barnett – Weight Loss Part Two

October 13, 2015

Last Week I wrote about weight loss as we age and this week I’m completing my tips: see below.

Strength training is one of the most important additions to any weight loss program.  . Strength training a minimum of twice a week will help prevent you from losing muscle as you age.  When your muscles shrink then your metabolic rate decreases.  When your metabolic rate decreases then your ability to burn up energy from food decreases as well. When that happens you put on body fat.   Lifting weights, resistance bands, heavy gardening, yoga are some examples of strength training activities.

As you age, your metabolism can slow down if you decrease your level of activity and exercise and don’t adjust your kilojoule intake. This results in weight gain. If this is/has happened to you, fight weight gain by becoming knowledgeable on food and portions suitable for you and adjust them as your lifestyle requirements change.  What suits one person doesn’t always suit another.  . As a general rule, you need to consume daily a couple of pieces of fruit, loads of colourful vegetables and a small amount of whole grain carbohydrate.   Protein is necessary too, so try sources like nuts (only a small handful p/day) and fresh fish, tofu, turkey or kangaroo.  Fats are important but don’t go the low fat options as you may find these foods are topped up with sugar or salt to replace the flavour that was lost when the fat was reduced.   Reduce your alcohol consumption and remove the sugar  from your life. Remember sugar comes under many different names and as such is often hidden in foods.

Check out the colour of your urine.  Your first urine of the day is probably yellow as it has become concentrated overnight but from then on it should be clear unless of course you are on medication or supplements like Vitamin B that can darken the colour.  Staying hydrated will assist with weight loss as it helps to flush out toxins and help your body’s functions perform optimally.  Start your day with a big glass of water and a dose of  lemon juice or a tablespoon of apple cider vinegar to kickstart the cleansing process.

Weight gain as you age is not your doomed future.  Society just accepts it because the majority of people have allowed themselves to succumb to middle age spread as their lifestyles change and they haven’t adjusted their habits accordingly.  Adjust your habits as your lifestyle changes and you will be better off physically, mentally and emotionally.

Come and have a free visit at Coffs Coast Health Club and see how our baby boomers do it!  Give Glen or Jacqui a call on 66586222 for a free session.

Healthy Inspirations Recipe of the Week – Moroccan Chicken Skewers

October 8, 2015

hi

hi

Over 50’s Fitness by Glen Barnett – Weight Loss Tips for the Ageing

October 6, 2015

Senior woman weighing self on scale

Saddle bags, bum bags and love handles – yep weight gain, and weight gain as we age can creep up on us just like those old undies we love to wear.

Reasons can be:  hormonal changes, high kj diet, decreased activity, stressful living, medical conditions and medications. Below (and next week) are some of the lifestyle changes you can look at to help stop the weight gain and improve the weightloss.

First separate being active and exercising.  Being active means you use the stairs, not the escalator, you park further away and walk to your appointments, you choose to move more and sit less.

Exercising is specific activities and times during your day and week that you set aside to do something  that will increase your heart rate, blood flow, breathing and effort level.

Note  the difference.  Write down under the headings of Active and Exercise,  what you do.  On another piece of paper take it further by writing down one side,  the word Active then below that the word Exercise.

Across the top of that page write the days of the week.  Now go through and tick which days you do Exercise and how long your are exercising and across the Active section tick how many times during each day you are active eg tick  for every active activity like scrubbing floors, taking the stairs, washing the car.

This will give you an idea of just how much you are moving in your life.  Think back to other times in your life when you weighed less.  Were you moving more then on a day to day basis?

Using opportunities to be active every day and exercising a minimum of 30minutes on most days will pay off.   Think back to your parents or grandparents day, they  probably didn’t need to have set exercising sessions, because they were far more active than we are.  Technology has made us less physical,  lazier, fatter and sicker.

Use this scale to perceive how vigorously you exercise:

  • 1 to 10 with 10 being the hardest section of your exercise.
  • 1-4  low exercise, you may be warming up; very comfortable
  • 5-6 moderate exercise, you can still talk or sing,
  • 7-8 is vigorous activity your heart rate is high and talking is a difficult.
  • 9-10 probably means you may be exercising too hard especially if you are feeling sick, lightheaded or can’t talk.
  • Exercise between levels 7-8 but increase the intensity atleast 3 times during your 30minute session. Making sure you finish your session slowing steadily down to a 1-4 before stopping.  Always check with your doctor before starting a new fitness program.

Next week,  what else you can do to tap into weight loss for older adults.

These are tried and true tips from us to you.  If you can’t wait until next week’s next tip, or you’d like a free session call Glen or Jacqui at Coffs Coast Health Club on 66586222