Archive for the ‘Fitness’ Category

Fitness starting with your Feet

November 29, 2015

Our feet and ankles are very important, considering we couldn’t stand, walk, run, or roundhouse kick someone in the face without them. Unfortunately, our lower limbs tend to be neglected unless something goes wrong.

Strong and flexible feet, ankles, and calves provide our base for stable movement, and are essential for performing our daily activities without pain or strain. In this article, I will give you a brief introduction to the the basic anatomy and movements in the ankle and foot (just enough for a good familiarity, but not enough for you to perform surgery…). Then, I’ll discuss the primary importance of working on this area, and finally, how to incorporate exercises for these areas into your training routine.

Your lower leg is made up of the bigger tibia on the inside and the smaller fibula on the outside, then connects lower down to the talus and the calcaneus (heel), then to the five small bones of the instep and the metatarsals and phalanges (your toes).

Lots of different sized ligaments connect the bones together for stability, along with various muscles from the big calf to the small muscles that move your toes.

Foot Anatomy

The ankle and foot is made to move in a great variety of angles to provide stability and dexterity, carrying us over all types of terrain from soft sand to rocky ground. Your ankle is not like a hinge on a door, and your foot isn’t just one big lump you slide your socks onto.

All the large and small joints in this area work together to provide this nimbleness, but only if we keep them moving like they are supposed to!

Your Lower Legs Work Hard for You – Here’s What They Do

Jump RopeOur calves (the bigger gastrocnemius and smaller, deeper soleus muscles) point the foot down, giving us the power to rise up on our toes and assist with running and jumping. But even with the foot flat on the ground, our calves provide stability in squatting, lunging, and other big movements.

On the front and sides of the shin are the anterior tibialis, posterior tibialis, and peronei muscles, which provide stability like stirrups and slings, and also the fine motor control that keeps us balanced and steady.

Down into the foot are many small muscles that control our arches and toes. These foot intrinsic muscles are the most at risk for atrophy from disuse when we don’t actively get out of our shoes and move our feet as we’re meant to do.

What Can Go Wrong in the Foot and Ankle

With all this considered, it’s easy to see the complexity of large and small muscles and joints working together to keep us upright and walking, as well as running, jumping, and balancing.

The coordination and differentiation of all these possible movements is key to foot and ankle control, and to moving freely and gracefully through your feet.

It’s also likely why we hear so many complaints about stiff ankles and feet.

If the smaller muscles are too weak to support your foot and ankle, your body reacts by increasing the tension where it can, in the bigger muscles. The tightness in the calf and ankle is then a protective mechanism that stretching may help a bit, but improved control and strength in the foot would solve.

Another common issue people experience is collapse arches in the feet. This is caused by poor mobility in the midfoot, along with weak posterior tibialis and intrinsic muscles. With improved mobility and strength in these areas, the arches should correct themselves over time.

Below we’ll discuss a variety of exercises with an emphasis on coordination and dexterity to wake up dormant muscles and restore proper mobility and control over this important area.

8 Exercises for Building Strength and Motor Control in the Feet and Ankles

The exercises we show here have an emphasis on active movement in various angles and ranges of motion.

A lot of people don’t fully explore the movement our feet and ankles are capable of, and this results in stiffness and weakness. The first step is knowing that it is actually possible to move this way, and the next and best step is to practice!

 

Below, we’ll look at each of these exercises in detail so you can understand the mechanics and benefits of each exercise, as well as programming recommendations.

1. Foot Circles with Toes Flexed (Curled)

Foot 1This movement concentrates on the small muscles in the arch of the foot. These foot intrinsicssupport the foot, and control over them means improved control and dexterity, which is so important in graceful and athletic movement.

It’s a simple movement – it’s just making a circle! – but the addition of flexing your toes makes this surprisingly difficult and can lead to muscle cramping in the beginning. Start off by not flexing your toes strongly and do the circles slowly.

Do 10-15 reps in each direction for 2-3 sets.

2. Toe and Ankle Movement Coordination

Foot 2Here is another simple movement that works on coordinating the use of the muscles of the lower leg and foot. Simply lift your foot up and down through your full range of motion and add the toe movements with it as well.

The coordination is toe extension (lifting toes upward) as you lift your foot upward, and toe flexion (curling in) as you point your foot down. And the other variation is then flexing your toes down as you lift your foot upward, and extending your toes as you point your foot down.

Do 10 repetitions of both variations for 2 sets.

3. Diagonal Patterns

Foot 3These are combined motion patterns of either your foot lifting up and rolling inward and then pointing down and outward; or your foot lifting up and rolling outward and then pointing down and inward. You are essentially tracing an X with your foot as you work on the coordination of ankle and foot motions.

This can be another surprisingly difficult exercise and is extremely useful for learning how your ankle can move.

Do 10-20 reps for 2-3 sets.

4. Rolling up Onto the Toes

Foot 4This is the first exercise where we are putting weight onto our feet.

The goal here is to combine a loaded active stretch to the ankle and foot together. It’s a dynamic move, so don’t hold too long in any position, instead go slowly through the full range and back again to encourage active movement through all the positions.

Do 5-8 reps for 3 sets.

5. Squats with Ankle Rotation

Foot 5In this exercise, don’t worry if you can’t drop down into the full deep squat position. The purpose of this exercise is to practice rolling on the inside and outside of your feet while weightbearing in a “compromising” position.

If you were to run and unexpectedly roll onto the side of your foot, you’d likely get a nasty ankle sprain. The exercise shown here is a progressive way to practice these common stresses to your feet and ankles. You can control the pressure and stress of the movement and use it to strengthen these positions to make it less likely to be severely injured when it unexpectedly happens.

Do 5-8 reps for 3 sets.

6. Ankle Rolling Side-to-Side

Ankle RollingHere we move to standing and up on the ball of the foot as we practice rolling our ankle from side to side.

Again, it’s better to do this while we are controlling the forces so we can strengthen them, rather than having it happen randomly and possibly causing injury.

Do 5-8 reps for 3 sets.

7. Weightbearing Ankle Circles on the Heel/Ball of Foot

Foot 7Continuing in standing, we’ll now practice ankle circles while placing as much weight as we are comfortable with on either our heels or on the ball of the foot.

There are different forces and strains involved in the two variations, so it’s good to familiarize yourself with both.

Do 10 reps in each direction for 2 sets.

8. Calf Raises

Calf RaisesAnother classic exercise, this is the most direct way of strengthening the calf muscles in their full range of motion from a full stretch to a full contraction. You can adjust your intensity by how much you hold on with your hands and by eventually adding weight to your body through a backpack or holding dumbbells.

If this is too much for you, then work both feet at the same time or start on a flat floor versus a step to reduce the range of motion until you get stronger and can handle strengthening from the full stretch.

Do 8-12 reps for 3 sets.

Fundamental Calf Stretches for Flexible Lower Legs

Calf StretchA very common complaint we hear from people is their lack of ankle flexibility.

Many bodyweight exercise moves, especially as you move into intermediate and advanced work, such as the pistol squat and various locomotive patterns, require good ankle flexibility.

The calf muscles are a very dense muscle group because we use them constantly – even just in standing and walking. And the ankle joints,  because of the lack of variety of motion throughout the day, tend to be stiff and immobile. This can require aggressive stretching, in terms of load, not intensity, to achieve improvements in range of motion.

A classic and effective exercise is using a step or sturdy block for your foot so you can drop your heel down to stretch.

It’s simple, not fancy, but works extremely well if you are consistent and approach it the right way. I recommend doing this in shoes, in this way you can place the middle of your foot on the edge of the step comfortably for the stretch. This is protective of your foot arch and allows you to put more weight into the stretch.

 

The variations are with your knee locked out straight and with your knee bent. The straight leg version emphasizes more of a gastrocnemius stretch, and the bent knee version gives the calf muscles a bit of slack and thus puts more of a stretch in the ankle joint.

The calf responds well to long holds of stretching, so 1 to 2 minutes for 3 sets should be a minimum goal. Stretch before active movement such as the strength and motor control exercises above so that your body learns to adjust and retain the new range of motion from the stretching.

Self-Massage Techniques for Healthy Feet, Ankles, and Calves

Self MassageA bit of self massage work is very useful in the lower leg and foot to loosen some tension prior to stretching and exercise.

The massage itself doesn’t make you more flexible, but it does temporarily help you feel less tight and gives you a window of opportunity to stretch further with less discomfort.

Just make sure not to overdo it, the trick is to apply just enough pressure to ease tension, not push as hard as you can to force it to happen!

 

Starting at the foot, work along the sole along the contours of the bones and feel the small muscles in you feet, keep the pressure light at first then gradually increase the pressure. If you are doing it correctly you’ll notice an easing off of tension in the muscles. You can then add more pressure and continue if you feel you need it, or move on to the next area.

Move on to the sides of your shin, into the calf and the front of your shin. The calf can be especially sore to massage deeply, so be aware of this and go gradually until you get accustomed to the pressure.

You can also use a ball to change the pressure and get into the muscles from a different angle.

Along with being mindful of gradually increasing pressure, you should limit your time on self massage to no more than 5 minutes. Too much of a good thing is still too much. And it is much more valuable to spend the majority of your time on active exercise.

Keep Your Feet Healthy for a Lifetime

Our ankles and feet are too often under-exercised and taken for granted considering how much we rely on them everyday. It’s no surprise that this neglect of their full range of motion and total potential for coordinated movement can lead to stiffness and weakness, and perhaps even pain.

This article focused on simple, yet effective exercises that not only lessen the chances of potential injury, but may also reverse some damage that has already been done (barring any true injuries in need of surgery or more intensive therapy).

Spend 5-10 minutes on these exercises every day, and you’re likely to feel your feet getting stronger, more flexible, and more able to handle variations in movement.

 

Article Sourced from: https://gmb.io/feet/

 

Over 50’s Fitness by Glen Barnett – Exercise as a Tonic

November 24, 2015

exercise tonic

Like a spoonful of sugar makes the medicine go down, a dose of exercise is the best tonic for mental (and physical) wellness.

Lets put aside the obvious medical conditions that we already know are benefitted by exercise and look at another condition –  menopause.

Menopause  is a very challenging time for women with a lot of hormonal, physical and mental changes occurring at once without warning and often leaving the woman with no idea when they will end.  Trying to ‘stay sane’ during this period of a woman’s life is how some women describe their battle with a body that is not doing what it has done all their lives. Menopause brings with it a body that is laying down fat in different areas; a body that the woman doesn’t often recognise as the one she’s ‘grown up’ with.   The benefits of exercise on our mental state during this time, can have an overriding effect on the physical symptoms that may present.

Exercise, relaxation and breathing exercises assist in helping the menopausal woman feel that she is taking back some control of the unpredictability of her menopausal symptoms.  The relaxation and the breathing give her strategies to deal with the mood swings and hot flushes. The exercise (and also dietary guidance) assists with the changes in her body weight and body fat placement and the stretching helps relieve discomfort in joints and muscles that often feel stiffer through this stage of life.

Never underestimate the benefit of a walk in the park or on the beach or just around the block, a good stretching session,  and/or an upside down yoga class.  Be proactive and make exercise your tonic to wellness.

At Coffs Coast Health Club we can really help you achieve the benefits I’ve described in this article. Give Glen or Jacqui a call on 66586222 for a free chat and let’s see how we can help you.

11 Health Hazards of Sitting too Long

May 19, 2015

sittingpain-front-leadWe live in a time where sitting takes up the majority of our day, but could sitting too long be slowly crippling our bodies?

Even with a daily exercise regimen, researchers are now saying that sitting for a major part of the day may be deadly in the long run, and are even making comparisons like, “sitting is the new smoking.” Check out this peer-reviewed article for more information on sedentary living and our health.

ORGAN DAMAGE, ILLNESS AND DISEASE
HEART DISEASE

Did you know that people with sitting jobs have twice the rate of cardiovascular disease than people with standing jobs? When we sit, our muscles burn less fat, and our blood flows much slower than it should – this encourages the build-up and clogging of fatty acids in the heart. In fact, after just 2 hours of sitting, your HDL (“good”) cholesterol drops 20%!

DIABETES

When we sit for too long, our blood sugar levels rise, because of enzyme changes that occur in our muscles. In fact, spending too much time sitting has been linked to a two-fold increase in the risk of developing diabetes. Scary, right? If you work a desk job, or sit down for long periods, make sure you get up every 30 minutes and walk around, do a few pushups or even a few squats!

PREMATURE DEATH

Sitting too long linked to an early death? It seems so, according to a study in the American Journal of Preventative Medicine, which found that sitting for long periods of time increases the odds of dying young. Even individuals who exercised regularly risked shortening their lifespan if a majority of their day was spent sedentary. Sitting for more than 6-8 hours a day is not good, so make sure you keep active!

COLON CANCER

People who spend a majority of their day sitting have an increased risk colon cancer, as well as breast and endometrial cancer. The main link between these cancers and sitting for long periods is the increased insulin levels that encourage tumour cell growth. Moving around every now and then helps lower insulin, and getting up after a meal instead of sitting helps lower blood sugar. Go for a walk in nature after dinner and watch your health improve!

OVER-PRODUCTIVE PANCREAS

As we have seen, sitting too long results in higher insulin production – and what organ produces insulin? The pancreas of course! Insulin helps carry glucose to cells for energy, but cells in a chronically in-active body don’t respond as readily to this insulin release. The result? More insulin production and a higher risk of developing diabetes and other diseases. One study found that with just 1 day of prolonged sitting, the insulin response was drastically reduced.

OBESITY

You burn 30% more calories when you’re standing, than when you’re sitting, no surprise, but when you’re sitting, the circulation of a fat-absorbing enzyme called lipase also shuts down, contributing to a larger waistline. Researchers at Tel Aviv University even found that sitting on your bottom for too long will make preadipocyte cells (cells that turn into fat calls) literally transform into fat cells faster!

SPINAL ISSUES
STRAINED NECK AND SHOULDERS

Muscle strain and tension is a major cause of neck pain. This is often a result of muscle overuse from sitting at a desk or computer for too long. When you’re sitting, you’re often slouching too (especially if working on a computer at a desk) – this “crane neck” posture strains the cervical vertebrae and can lead to permanent imbalances. Slouching also overextends shoulder and back muscles, which results in chronic poor posture and “rolling in” of the shoulders.

INFLEXIBLE SPINE

When we are actively engaged in any form of activity, soft discs between the vertebrae expand and contract like shock absorbers, helping supply the disks of nutrients, fresh blood, and oxygen. When we are sitting for long periods of the day, the disks are out of balance, and also starved of these crucial nutrients. Collagen also hardens around tendons and ligaments that help support the spine, resulting in a stiff back with little flexibility. My tip? Do some yoga and slowly work your way into backbends – one of the most fool-proof ways to heal the spine.

DISK DAMAGE

As stated above, moving very little deprives our disks of crucial nutrients, blood and oxygen. Not only that, but individuals who sit for long periods are more at risk for herniated lumbar disks. When you’re sitting, your spine is under a lot of pressure, and the weight isn’t evenly distributed. As Kelly McGonial, Ph.D., explains, “when you sit, you distort the natural curve of the spine, which means your back muscles have to do something to hold your back in shape because you’re no longer using the natural curves of the spine to lift yourself up against gravity.”

BRAIN PERFORMANCE
REDUCED MENTAL CLARITY and BRAIN FOG

When sedentary for long periods of time, everything slows down, even our brain function! This is no surprise, given the fact that when we move, fresh blood and oxygen are pumped to our brain at a faster rate, helping improve the release of productivity- and mood-enhancing chemicals.

MUSCLE DEGENERATION
WEAK ABS

When we stand straight and walk around, our abdominal muscles help keep us upright. But when we are sitting, our posture is often situated in such a way that our stomachs bulge and our ab muscles are loose. Always engage your core when sitting, especially if you work a desk job. Tuck in your lower abdominal muscles so that you can feel tightness and “engaging” in your abs.

TIGHT HIPS

Excessive sitting can actually shorten (and tighten) your hip flexors, which isn’t good news for those of us trying to improve our flexibility. People who sit for long periods of the day rarely extend their hip flexors, limiting their range of motion and stride length. How do you prevent your muscles from shortening? Deep squats, lunges, standing hip extensions and prone hip extensions are a good place to start.

LIMP LEGS

When you’re sitting, your legs are doing nothing – and they get used to it too. Weak, limp legs can result in a host of biomechanical issues in the body like reduced stability, poor balance and increased risk of injury. Weak legs also increase your risk for having a higher rate of bone fracture – the stronger your legs, the more muscle there is protecting and supporting the bone.

health-hazard-of-sitting1

Article sourced from  http://livelovefruit.com/11-health-dangers-of-sitting-too-long/#4JSQuy6QAi0YZwkT.99

Let’s Talk About Breathing

May 5, 2015

noseclip

Ever run with a blocked nose? Horrible isn’t it? Anyone who participates in any form of physical activity – especially competitively – knows how important good breathing is. Not just breathing – good breathing.  As a triathlete I’m always on the lookout for new techniques and tools to (legally) give me a sporting edge, so I was intrigued to hear about a piece of kit called ‘Turbine Sports Breathing Technology’.

Developed by Australian medical techy company, Rhinomed, Turbine, I was told, opens the airways and is clinically proven by the Royal Victorian Eye and Ear Hospital to increase airflow, on average, up to 38 per cent in each breath, aiding efficiency, performance and recovery. Impressive claim. And pro athletes like Chris Froome and Rachel Naylan are apparently on board. Well, if it’s good enough for them… Those airways, incidentally, are the nostrils (in case the ‘Rhino’ name didn’t give it away).

Hmmm, how was this going to work – was I going to run like a serious pro while wearing an amusing false nose? Well, not quite, but almost… So, with some interest I opened my pack of little yellow gadgets and selected the size that best fitted my nose. After pulling my runners on I hit the pavement and took my little nasal buddy for a 10km run.

So, how’d it go? Pretty well for me, and even better for my nose which completed the course 38% faster than the rest of me. Ha ha, I jest. But actually, I did feel some benefits from wearing the nose clip, which sits fairly snugly inside the nose. It felt a little odd at first, but after a few minutes I got used to it and hardly noticed the nose plug in there during the run. I felt the airways opened up more during my run, and also felt good after taking the Turbine out.

On the cons list, well, I sweat a lot on my nose so had to be careful not to wipe the sweat off too much, as it hurt with the Turbine in if I pressed too hard. The yellow colour also makes flat-nosed people like me look a little silly, so something more skin-tone coloured (ideally a range from nude to dark) would be great – maybe that’ll happen in the next release.

All in all, I definitely noticed a difference after just one run. Now, to try it on the bike.

This post was written by Bel ‘The Fonginator’ Fong, avid triathlete and Senior Course Coordinator with PT and fitness education provider fitnessU.
Article sourced here :  http://www.fitnessnetwork.com.au/_blog/Network_Blog/post/i-put-this-up-my-nose-to-enhance-my-performance-legally/

Just Do It …

March 22, 2015

It has been described as arguably the best tagline of the 20th century. It is certainly one of the most recognised.

But, Nike’s fitspo “Just do it” line has its dark roots on death row.

It was inspired by the last words of a convicted killer before his execution.

In a new interview, Dan Wieden, the advertising executive behind the famous campaign, opened up about its origins.

It was 1988 and Wieden was struggling to come up with a line that could capture the sportswear company’s spirit across different TV commercials the ad agency had created for them.

“I was recalling a man in Portland,” Wieden told Dezeen magazine.

Utah killer Gary Gilmore was sentenced to death in 1977 for robbing and murdering two men.

“They asked him if he had any final thoughts and he said: ‘Let’s do it’,” Wieden recalled.

“And for some reason I went: ‘Now damn. How do you do that? How do you ask for an ultimate challenge that you are probably going to lose, but you call it in?’ So I thought, well, I didn’t like ‘Let’s do it’ so I just changed it to ‘Just do it’.”

At first Nike’s founders hated the idea.

“[Co-founder] Phil Knight said, ‘We don’t need that shit’,” Wieden said. “I said ‘Just trust me on this one.’ So they trusted me and it went big pretty quickly.”

The ‘Just do it’ line made its debut that same year in an ad featuring 80-year-old runner Walt Stack.

“I run 17 miles every morning,” Stack says in the ad. “People ask me how I keep my teeth from chattering in the winter-time.

just do it“I leave them in my locker,” he smiles as the screen fades to black and the slogan “Just do it” appears with the trademark swoosh.

The slogan and the swoosh resonated with all audiences and helped Nike overtake their rival Reebok to dominate the sneaker market.

It is “arguably the best tagline of the 20th century,” says Campaign magazine, noting it “cut across age and class barriers, linked Nike with success – and made consumers believe they could be successful too, just by wearing its products”.

Of the slogan that is still popular 30 years later, the magazine said: “Like all great taglines, it was both simple and memorable. It also suggested something more than its literal meaning, allowing people to interpret it as they wished and, in doing so, establish a personal connection with the brand.”

Article published first March 19, 2015 here: http://www.theage.com.au/lifestyle/diet-and-fitness/nikes-just-do-it-slogan-inspired-by-death-row-prisoners-last-words-20150318-1m2oys.html

Surviving the HSC

October 19, 2014

HSC_English_Cramming_

Practical advice for the whole family

If your child is studying for the HSC, you’re probably feeling the stress too. Many parents want to help but don’t want to interfere.

As well as pre-exam tension, there are other common factors that can make life seem even more challenging for the whole family.

Year 12 is often the year when kids:

  • lose interest in school
  • have no plans for after the HSC
  • develop an intense relationship with a boyfriend or girlfriend
  • get their driver’s licence
  • experiment with legal or illegal drugs
  • have a part-time job
  • are a member of a sporting team
  • develop an eating disorder
  • suffer from depression.

If any of these concerns sound familiar, don’t despair. You’re not alone – and this won’t last forever.

How you can help

Richard Cracknell, counsellor and district guidance officer at Inverell High School advises that “the most obvious forms of support parents can offer are the practical, physical things,” and recommends parents:

  • Provide a good place to study, that’s quiet, comfortable, with good ventilation, good lighting, adequate desk or table space and free from distractions such as TV, noise, a telephone, interesting conversations, little brothers and sisters.
  • Provide healthy, balanced meals.
  • Encourage sleep and regular exercise.
  • Encourage them to avoid late night parties and alcohol consumption.

Less obvious, but just important, is giving your child the support they need in the lead-up to exams, which can be hard when emotions run high.

Tips to remember

  • Be supportive and encouraging.
  • Highlight strengths and successes. Encourage your child not to dwell on failures, but to see them as “mistakes”, which can actually be something they can learn and benefit from.
  • Appreciate your child maybe feeling very stressed, even if it’s not obvious to you. Many kids fear letting their family down so beware of setting unrealistic expectations. Some worry they can’t do as well as a sibling, or friend. Many Year 12 kids are feeling overwhelmed about what lies ahead: leaving home, leaving lifelong friends, the prospect of having to live in a new city.
  • Understand people under pressure become supersensitive and explosive from time to time. Family members are usually the first targets. Try not to overreact.
  • Be realistic in your expectations as to where the HSC leads. Not all HSC students will go on to university – but they can still have a wealth of excellent and satisfying career options. If they don’t get the HSC marks they needed and still really want to go on to tertiary education later, there are many other pathways. Interestingly, the success rate of mature age students is much higher than for those who go straight from school.
  • Encourage your child to seek help from teachers or the school counsellor if they are having any difficulty with subjects, study organisation, stress or anxiety about examinations.
  • Encourage a healthy balance between work and leisure. Some times kids need a total break from everything for a weekend  or so, to recharge their batteries.
  • Take an interest in what your child is doing, if they’ll allow you to (some won’t). This can include the subjects or topics being studied, how their study timetables and programs have been organised and their leisure pursuits. (Note: “Taking an interest in” does not mean interfering.)
  • Remember the occasional hug and “I love you” don’t go astray, even when they are 18 years old.
  • Encourage and allow your child to be as independent as you can possibly stand. The more independent your child is in meeting the demands of Year 12, the better prepared they will be to succeed at a tertiary level or in the workforce.

Just before exams:

  • Don’t stress about the little things like leaving lights on, leaving the lid off the toothpaste and not doing chores.
  • Don’t panic when they announce on the evening before the examination that they know nothing. (Reassure them, even if you think they could be right. “Just do the best you can. We know you’re giving it your best shot.” is a good standby.)
  • Avoid nagging, which doesn’t mean you can’t give a nudge or gentle reminder from time to time.
  • Encourage confidence by reassuring your child. If you have doubts, keep them to yourself.

According to Richard Cracknell, all parents make mistakes, and we need to bear in mind that we’re human too.

Don’t feel too badly when you forget not to nag, when you get picky, and complain bitterly that your child has the time to attend the 18th birthday party of every Year 12 student, but doesn’t have time to help with the washing up.

As parents we sometimes can’t help being over-involved and from time to time we also feel the pressure of Year 12.

Know this is a temporary stage, just like the newborn, toddler and adolescent stages you’ve already negotiated together.

Article sourced here: http://www.schoolatoz.nsw.edu.au/homework-and-study/homework-tips/tips-for-surviving-the-hsc

Over 50’s Fitness & Health by Glen Barnett – Cruising Health Tips

October 14, 2014

images
Going on a cruise is a great way to fit in some time off and really relax. Unfortunately we tend to come back with little more baggage than we left with, usually around our waist, and hips, and thighs, and… need I go on?
So to combat this I have designed a list of how to NOT get fat on a cruise.
Here’s the plan:
1–Stay out of the lifts. Aim to not set foot in the  lifts. Trust me, if you use the stairs every single time you have to go up five floors because you forgot your sun glasses, you’ll feel it in your legs and burn up those calories.
2–Skip the breakfast buffet.  You can go to the sit-down breakfast, order something sensible, and feel less like you’re eating at a trough. Allow yourself a day at the buffet if you like, but every day is setting yourself up for rapid weight gain?
3–Find the track. There’s usually one deck that has a walking/jogging path marked out. Find out when you can use this and off you go. You can also download an audio book or music on your iPod before you leave home, and you’ll be entertained while getting your daily activity.
4–Make good use of your off-ship time.  Sign on for an active excursion or make your own. Go for a walk to enjoy the scenery or hire a bike and explore on a ride. This could end up being a highlight of your holiday and it will beat heading to another t-shirt and souvenir shop.
5–Share desserts.  You don’t need more than a bite anyway, and if you share, you can try more than one.
6–Stay sober.  We all know some people who think holiday is synonymous with a drunken bender but this is no good for your health at all. Getting drunk means you’re consuming all the calories in the drinks, plus you’re more likely to overeat.  Bad combination.
7–Remember that there will be more food tomorrow.  If you can afford to go on a holiday, you are probably not at risk of starvation.  The food will be there when you get up in the morning, and it’ll be there when you get home, too.  It’s not necessary to eat everything in sight.
Most important, you are on holidays. So ensure you don’t stress about the whole calorie thing. Just don’t over indulge and stay active. Have a great time and enjoy the experience.

For more healthy and fit holiday tips call Glen at Coffs Coast Health Club on 6658 6222.