Archive for the ‘Glen Barnett Personal Training’ Category

Stop and Smell the Roses by Glen Barnett

October 18, 2016

Ageing Sucks, So Stop And Smell The Roses roses.jpg

 Someone said to me the other day that ageing is unimportant unless you are a cheese. This person was 70 had a lovely weathered face and a life behind them that was filled with achievements, experiences, adventures and many different pathways.  Just like most people their age.  So why do I think ageing sucks – because I don’t want this life to ever end.

Yes, I know I could drop dead tomorrow but as you age there is that awareness that you are heading closer to the exit sign than you were a few years ago.

How fantastic is life. That is not a question it is a statement. There are so many wonderful things to explore, enjoy and experience.  Now that exploration and those experiences may not always be enjoyable but they do allow us to gather the knowledge and insight to so much more than we started out with.

Next time you go out and about take a moment or more to look, feel and listen.  Look at life around you. Close your eyes and feel life around you. Open your ears and hear life around you. Even draw your breath in and smell life around you.  Get saturated in life. Sometimes this experience will be overwhelming to all your senses. Other times you may feel one sense is more enlightened than another.  This is a simple process that we don’t often pursue because we are too busy, to rushed or to blinked in our pursuits.

We all have favourite things to do that bring contentment to us or put a smile on our faces.   Watching children play, listening to favourite music, singing loudly in the shower or car, smelling the flowers at the florist, browsing through your favourite magazine at the newsagent even doing something crazy like when your money comes out of the ATM shout “I Won, I Won”.

Everyday indulge in one of these but don’t see this indulgent time as a treat, because it is your right. Your right to stop and smell the roses and fully enjoy, experience and explore every minute of your fantastic life.

For any other crazy ideas on how to live life to the fullest, call Glen Barnett at Coffs Coast Health Club on 66586222.

 

 

 

 

 

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Glen Barnett Discusses the Top 10 Ways to Stay Healthy This Summer

October 4, 2016

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Ok I’ve been asked again to write my top 10 ways to stay healthy this summer.  Let’s have a look at them &  make sure yours is the healthiest ever.

  1. Activity guidelines for Australians recommend a minimum of 30 minutes of moderate physical activity most days. So as well as doing some structured exercise get outside and go for a swim, surf, bush walk, bike ride or even a kayak.
  2. Remember the Slip, Slop, Slap and Wrap Campaign. Slip on a shirt, slop on the sunscreen, slap on a hat and wrap on some sunnies.
  3. Stay as cool as a cucumber. Eating cucumber after you workout will help bring your body temperature back to normal.
  4. After your workout try room temperature water rather than drinking a cold drink which will interfere with your body’s natural cooling mechanism (sweat).
  5. Match your workout to the temperature and the time of day you’re going to be active. For instance don’t go for your power walk in the middle of a hot day get up earlier and hit the pavement then. Try swimming later in the day so you’re left refreshed and relaxed and ready for a good night’s sleep.
  6. Can’t sleep on these warm nights? Prepare yourself and your boudoir for the night. Use a fan, remove some of your bedding, sprinkle some lavender on your pillow to promote relaxation, enjoy a cool shower just before you hop into bed and enjoy the cool fan on your body as you drift off.
  7. When you wake in the morning enjoy a large glass of room temperature water mixed with some lemon juice and then throughout your day make sure hydration is at the top of your list. If you feel hungry check you’re not thirsty. A lot of people mistake thirst for hunger and during summer you don’t need those extra calories but you do need that extra hydration.
  8. Remember winter immunity starts in summer so enjoy raw salads or steamed veges to get the best nutrients. Include foods that are H2O rich like cucumber, carrots, steamed zucchini and melons to fill you up and keep your kjs down.
  9. Don’t like daylight saving? Try to get at least 15minutes of direct sunlight each day because before you know it the days will be shorter and our Vitamin D levels will be diminishing.
  10. Last but not least – smile. If you can’t smile fake it. Laughing and smiling release feel good healthy hormones which will definitely serve you well every day of summer and into those autumn days to come.

Give Glen or Jacqui a call at Coffs Coast Health Club on 66586222 or organise.

Glen Barnett discusses Exercise as Medicine

August 2, 2016

exercise-is-medicine

Here is a concept that I really want you to consider, I want you to view exercise and being active as medicine, a dose of goodness to manage your health, weight and wellness.  It has been proven over and over that as a preventative measure to ill health and as a ‘cure’ for a lot of ailments, exercise is the best medicine around.

So if we know that this ‘medicine’ called exercise can have such a positive effect on our well being then why isn’t everyone taking their daily dose?   Who knows maybe fear, laziness or indecision?  Here’s some help.

Start with a goal and see your goal as being your dessert – something you’re really looking forward to but you need to earn it.   Get to your goal in small bite size pieces. If your goal is to drop 20kg then plot some smaller increments in your calendar rather than the big figure down the track.

Make sure you get your exercise dosage correct so get some guidance.  It is important to know how much exercise should be ‘absorbed’ to give you the maximum benefit for your goal.  Exercise should be prescribed in a specific dose you know that works for you including type, intensity, frequency and duration.  Definitely sample different types of exercise medicine, until you’ve found what ‘medicinal remedy’ fits best with you or is easiest to swallow.   Basically make sure the exercise you ‘take’ is something you enjoy and something that is going to help you get to your goal.

Make a commitment to your health, yourself and your future. Taking a daily dose of exercise medicine in some way nearly every day will lead to a positive lifestyle change and a very healthy habit

So if you decide you want to get a dose of one of the best medicines for your health, call me, “Dr” Glen, at Coffs Coast Health Club on 66586222 and we can organise a FREE prescription to get you started.

 

Signs That You’re Exhausted (Not Just Tired)

July 24, 2016

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If you stifle yawns in 2 p.m. meetings and find yourself passed out cold during the previews on movie nights, you probably already know you’re run down. But there’s a big difference between being pooped out and being exhausted — and the signs aren’t as obvious as just feeling tired. It’s important to know the difference, because exhaustion can be downright dangerous.

“Sleep is one of the most under-appreciated facets of health,” says Dr. Wayne Scott Andersen, MD, medical director of Take Shape for Life. “The consequences of sacrificing it can ripple throughout various areas of your life. Exhaustion has been linked to issues with appetite regulation, heart disease, increased inflammation, and a 50 percent increase in your risk of viral infection.” So if you’re tired and you’re experiencing any of the symptoms below, it might mean you’re exhausted — and it’s time to devote some serious time to sleep, ASAP

6 Clues That You’re Totally Exhausted

1. Your Lips Are Dry
If your lips are cracked, your skin is scaly, and you’re suffering from frequent headaches, dehydration may be to blame. Yes, this is a common woe in cold-weather climates. But, if you’re feeling rundown, you should know it goes hand-in-hand with exhaustion. “You feel more fatigued the more dehydrated you are,” says Michael J. Breus, PhD, a board-certified expert in clinical sleep disorders. “If you’re constantly craving something to drink or experience dry skin and lips, you might be dealing with a level of hydration that can lead to exhaustion.”

“You won’t retain knowledge very well, as your brain depends on sleep to re-process what you experienced during the day.”

Water affects so many systems within your body that it’s impossible to maintain your energy levels if you’re not drinking sufficient amounts of H20, he explains. “People often forget to hydrate because it just isn’t on their minds. Everyone’s different, but I always tell people you should drink water to the point where your urine is clear,” says Breus.

2. Your Mind Is All Fuzzy
Your brain needs sleep like a car needs gas; neither runs very well on empty. “Among other things, your body uses sleep to stabilize chemical imbalances, to refresh areas of the brain that control mood and behavior, and to process the memories and knowledge that you gathered throughout the day,” says Dr. Andersen.

This is especially important during the 90-minute period known as REM (rapid eye movement) sleep. When it’s disturbed, your mind might be sluggish the next day. “You won’t retain knowledge very well, as your brain depends on sleep to re-process what you experienced during the day,” says Dr. Andersen. Exhaustion can leave you vulnerable to forgetting important things, like a big meeting at work, or feeling especially irritable, says Dr. Andersen.

3. Your Workouts Have Sucked
Not crushing it at the gym like you usually do? Being exhausted causes every aspect of your life to suffer — including exercise, according to Dr. Andersen. “Exercising requires mental focus as well as physical activity,” Andersen says. “If your brain is falling behind because you are not well-rested, your ability to properly challenge your body will be limited — and that’s in addition to the many performance consequences that come with poor sleep.”

Another big sign: You can’t even bring yourself to make it to the gym. “Our bodies are programmed to find the easy way out, which was useful 10,000 years ago when survival was difficult. Today that means one night of lost sleep can lead to weeks of missed workouts and unhealthy meals,” says Dr. Andersen.

4. You’re Super Stressed (and Trying to Ignore It)
It’s no surprise that stress can keep you up at night, but the way you deal with it is what might cause exhaustion-inducing insomnia, according to research in the journal SleepFor the study, researchers asked nearly 2,900 men and women about the stress in their lives, including how long it affected them, how severe it was, and how they handled the pressure. A year later, the researchers found that people who coped with stress by distracting themselves, dwelling on the issues, or trying to completely ignore it had higher instances of chronic insomnia, which they characterized as three sleepless nights a week for a month or more. This can turn into a vicious cycle of stress and exhaustion fueling one other. The researchers suggest using mindfulness techniques to ease stress might be a better way to cope.

5. You’re Eating More Junk Than Usual
Find yourself hitting up the office vending machine on the regular? “The more exhausted you are, the more you crave high-fat, high-carbohydrate foods,” says Breus. Exhaustion often corresponds with high levels of cortisol, the stress hormone. To decrease cortisol, your brain will often seek out a hit of the neurotransmitter serotonin. “[Serotonin] is a calming hormone. An easy way to access it is by ingesting comfort food full of carbs and fat,” says Breus.

Even worse, all that comfort food can just wind up making you more exhausted. “With highly processed, highly glycemic foods like soft drinks, candy bars, or bagels, blood sugar and insulin levels will rise dramatically,” says Dr. Anderson. “The elevated insulin levels actually cause blood sugar to plummet, so your brain triggers [more] cravings for something full of sugar, fat, and calories.” Then, it starts all over again. Instead of reaching for comforting junk, Dr. Andersen recommends fueling your body with healthy low-glycemic foods like fruits and whole grains that can help stabilize your blood sugar and keep your insulin levels from swinging wildly in either direction.

6. You Sleep Poorly Even Once a Week
You probably know that chronic insomnia can trigger exhaustion. But did you know that even a single night of interrupted sleep could screw you up the next day? In a study in the journal Sleep Medicine, 61 study participants slept for eight hours for one night. The next night, their rest was interrupted by four phone calls that instructed them to finish a short computer challenge before they could continue sleeping. Researchers found that after a night of fragmented sleep, people experienced worse moods along with weaker attention spans, suggesting that interrupted sleep might be as detrimental as the exhaustion that comes with full-on sleep restriction.

Or, maybe instead of dealing with interrupted sleep, you just go to bed way later than you should. “Bedtime procrastination” is the latest buzzy term in sleep medicine. In a study in Frontiers in Medicine, researchers discovered that on nights when the 177 participants reported procrastinating their zzz’s, they slept less and with worse quality. Plus, they experienced more intense fatigue the next day. “Set your bedtime and stick to it, counting back seven hours from when you need to wake up to determine the ideal start to your sleep latency period, or falling asleep time,” advises Dr. Andersen. “Decrease stimulation 30 minutes before you plan to sleep by shutting off cellphones, televisions, and other devices.”

Ready to make a change? Check out this guide for a better night’s rest.

Updated January 2016  on 1/15/2016
http://dailyburn.com/life/lifestyle/exhausted-signs-tips/

 

Glen Barnett discusses Stomach Exercises

July 19, 2016

flat stomach
One of the most common questions Personal Trainers are asked is how to get a flat stomach.  One of the most common exercise mistakes people make in trying to get a flat stomach, is to do situps.  To flatten your stomach you need to really pay attention to what types of food you eat and how much, do some cardio exercise that gets you huffy and puffy and do a variety of core exercise.  Here are just a few examples:

Ride an imaginary bike while lying on your back. It can be a challenging exercise but will activate your deep core muscles.  Remember to start with lifting up your pelvic floor first, then drawing your lower stomach muscles in firmly. Bend your knees and lift your feet one at a time off the floor.  Now start ‘cycling’ your legs  at a moderate pace. Key point is to keep you back on the ground.

Then  to strengthen the muscles in your lower back start by lying on your stomach, lift your pelvic floor and draw your lower stomach muscles in. Then stretch your arms out in front of you, raise your head, then one arm and opposite leg, about 2cms off the floor. Lower and repeat on the opposite side. If you need to make it easier,  then just lift either the arm or just the leg.

 Side bends will help strengthen the muscles that run along the side of your torso and those muscles that help you with rotating.  Standing firmly on both feet, again lift your pelvic floor and draw your lower stomach muscles in firmly. Let your arms hang down each side then lean over to the side as if reaching sideways toward the floor. Add some extra resistance by holding onto something that weighs a few kgs.  Try not to lean forward and definitely keep both feet flat on the floor.

 

With the above exercises, keep breathing, a steady pace and continue for 30 seconds.  Rest then repeat.

 

If you’d like a free session at Coffs Coast Health Club give Glen or Jacqui a call on 66586222.

Glen Barnett discusses the Squat

June 21, 2016

Squat-2
To squat or not to squat. For most people squatting is not a problem but there are those who find squatting difficult for many reasons.   Let’s check in on your squatting technique because squatting is a really great exercise that is very functional – meaning it is something you do a lot of everyday and probably don’t even realise it.   Here are some examples:  sitting down then standing up from your kitchen chair – that’s a squat, same as sitting and standing from the toilet, the lounge, from the bed, getting out of the car etc etc.  So if you’re having trouble doing any of those things then with some isolated squatting practice you will improve those functional day to day squats. Afterall you do get what you train for.

Squats will also shape your legs and your butt, improve your core strength and back strength and make you stronger throughout your lower body.

Firstly as a simple exercise start with your feet about hip width apart.

  • Breath in then as you exhale stick your butt out
  • Bend your knees
  • Then bend them further to lower your butt down.
  • Stopping before your butt gets to knee height.
  • Keep your back straight (don’t become a hunch back).
  • Keep your head up and eyes forward.
  • Chest out and shoulders back.
  • Weight equal on both feet but lean slightly backward.
  • Drive through outside of heels and sides of feet to stand up! Nice work one done.
  • Can you do 10? If so try 3 sets of 10 with 1minute recovery by walking or jogging on the spot.

Here are some different ways to do a squat; each increases the intensity.

  1. Use a chair – sit down stand up
  2. Add hand weights or a barbell
  3. Add a jump to make it a jump squat
  4. Jump up onto a stair or block then step back down

If you’d like more information then give Jacqui or Glen a call on 66586222 to organise a free session.

Glen Barnett discusses the Upright Row

June 7, 2016

barbell_upright_rowThis week I want to talk to you about a really great upper body exercise traditionally called an upright row.  The upright row is an exercise that will help you develop and strengthen the shoulder and also the trapezius muscles in the upper back.  You also get help from your biceps when doing this exercise.

You can perform the upright row holding on to a bar, dumbells, kettlebells, using a cable machine  or even holding onto a theraband or resistance tubing.

  • Hold the resistance tubing at each end with both hands and let it run under one foot (see picture).
  • Now lift your elbows up high and bring your hands to approximately your chest height (I have also heard an instructor say to her participants in her all older female class “to the height of your nipples or where they use to be”!)
  • Then, control the release and return to your start position.
  • That’s one repetition.

 

Keep the movement slow and controlled no matter what resistance you are using. The wider the grip the more you will target your shoulder muscles while the narrower the grip the more you will target your trapezius muscles.  Keep your chest open, belly strong and remember to breathe.

 

Now like any exercise there are people who will find this exercise doesn’t suit them.  Remember you should never feel any joint pain during any exercise or activity.  If you have rounded shoulders or shoulder problems then the upright row is probably an exercise you should avoid. Instead you could look at a seated row or specific rotator cuff exercises to strengthen and stabilize your shoulder joints.  Next week make sure you grab your Saturday Advocate and I will go through the benefits of the rotator cuff.

 

If you’d like to take advantage of a really great personal training offer we have at Coffs Coast Health Club at the moment which is 3 30minute Personal Training sessions for $99 , then give Glen or Jacqui a call on 66586222.  Call before the end of June to book.

Glen Barnett discusses the Rotator Cuff

May 31, 2016

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You may have heard of an injury that many people refer to as “rotor cup”,   “rotatory cup”, or “rotor cuff”. They are referring to a set of four muscles which make up what’s called the Rotator Cuff.  These muscles are the infraspinatus, supraspinatus, subscapularis and teres minor.  Big names for very important but often neglected muscles.

They work together to give your shoulder stability during movement whether you are an athlete or just an everyday person.  Because our lives have become more  sedentary where we are sitting more at our desks or computers, our posture has suffered.  As a result muscle groups like our Rotator Cuff muscles have become weak and ineffective.

This muscle group can also become stressed by over-exercising, poor technique, accidents or not controlling movement effectively.

So what do you do to help it?  Firstly be aware your mum was right, when she said stand up straight, shoulders back, tummy in.  If you’re round shouldered and tight through your chest you need to stretch it, to open it out again.  Then this is a good starting strength exercise using a theraband or some tubing.  If you have an injury be guided by your physiotherapist on the level of resistance with your tubing.  These muscles can get fatigued quite quickly when they are not conditioned.

 

Tie the theraband or tubing around a pole or shut it in a door.  Stand with your left side facing the door and the tubing in your right hand. Step away from the door to create some tension in the tubing. Standing with good posture gently squeeze your shoulderblades partially together.

 

Now imagine that you are a door frame, bend your elbow at 90degrees against your side waist area. Your elbow is now a hinge so kept it glued to you, the door frame.  Your forearm is now the door so the action is like you are opening the door (as you pull the tubing away from the pole) then closing the door as you gently release the tubing towards the pole), keeping your elbow hinged against your side waist.  Try doing up to 10 repetitions then turn around to change arms x 3, 3 x a week.

 

If you’d like more guidance on this exercise or to try a free class,call Glen Coffs Coast Health Club Toormina on 66586222.

 

 

Glen Barnett discusses the Hamstring Muscles

May 24, 2016

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Forget the Brazilian Butt Lift to keep the back of your legs and your butt toned – try this effective hamstring exercise to keep gravity at bay.   Your hamstring muscles are the ones at the back of the upper leg.  They play a really important role in your core stability and knee stability.  So how do you get them stronger and more toned?   Firstly, if you have any knee or lower back problems check in with your physio or personal trainer before doing this exercise.

Level 1

Lay on the ground, with your feet about hip width apart. Now step your feet further away from your body so your legs are almost straight.  Pull your toes back so your heels are digging into the ground.  Lift your pelvic floor, draw your belly in and tighten your butt as you lift your hips off the ground then return them part way down.  That’s one repetition.

Increase your pace as you do 8 more then control your movement as you slowly lift one leg and foot upward at a time as if you were slowly walking.  Do about 6 then go back to the quick butt lifts.  Try doing the quick butt lifts alternating with the slow walking for about 1 minute. Have a break for 30 seconds and try another 1 minute set. Repeat.

Level 2

Now to make it harder, place your feet on a stable chair (one that doesn’t slide away from you) and do the same format or even harder…

Level 3

Place your legs on a fit ball.  The fit ball of course is very unstable so the idea is to keep it a still as possible as you do the exercise.  Feel your hamstrings sing!

Call Glen or Jacqui on 66586222 for more information.

 

 

 

Over 50’s Fitness by Glen Barnett – Falls Prevention

March 15, 2016

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To fall or not to fall?    It’s not really a hard question to answer. I know I want to stay upright for as many years as I can. As you age you may have heard “ I’ve finally got my head together and now my body is falling apart”.    It doesn’t have to be that way but it is important to be aware that statistics show the risk of falling escalates around 65 years of age.   Falls prevention should start as young as 40+.

Causes
Deteriorated/deteriorating health – weight gain, blood pressure issues etc
Flexibility, mobility and strength loss associated with inactive ageing.
Lack of exercise leading to impaired balance – weakened core and stabilising muscles.
Gait changes eg shuffling walk and not lifting your feet.
Impaired visual acuity – bifocals, dim lighting, bright sunshine.
Environmental
Inappropriate footwear – thongs, slippers and loosely laced shoes
People traffic – busy shopping centres
Unfamiliar environment – creates caution and confusion
Uneven, loose or slippery floors – at home, foot paths, wet areas
How to prevent falls
Increasing muscle strength, flexibility and bone density and
Improving balance and gait.

The first step, starting today,  is to increase the strength and endurance in your legs because if they give way the only way you will be going is down.  Try the following movement opportunities:
Walking – anywhere
In the house, in the street
Parks the Jetty and Harbour area
With a friend or go solo

Then increase the intensity by:
Finding a gentle hill to walk up
Walking faster
Increase the distance
Picking up a dancing class or two
Attending classes specifically older adults

Next Increase your leg strength.  As I have said in previous articles, you lose 10% of muscle up to 55 then 40% more after that. Try some:
Step ups
Wall push ups
Rows with some cans, hand weights or resistance bands
Seated squats.
Don’t ignore your balance:
Try  hanging on to a table/ wall, standing on one leg, and as your balance improves you will find you can release your death grip.  Prepare your body for falling and you will find you don’t fall as easily as you think you will.

Stay active.  Keep moving.  Get out of the lounge chair.

Oh and by the way make sure you keep getting down on to the ground so you can practise getting up . You don’t want to be in a situation that if you do fall you can’t get up.  To summarize:
if you don’t use it you will lose it; and
falls prevention requires your attention!

Call Glen or Jacqui on 66586222 to organise a free session at Coffs Coast Health Club.