Archive for the ‘Baby Boomers’ Category

Sleep Like a Baby by Glen Barnett

October 11, 2016

sleep
Sleep like a Baby? Not Likely!

Sleeping like a baby may be something Baby Boomers would dream about, if only they could stay asleep, or at least get to sleep in the first place.

Having trouble sleeping is not uncommon especially as you get older.   The average person needs 7-9 hours of good quality sleep regardless of their age.  This may vary person to person but the quality of your sleep is what’s important.

There are many factors as we age that can affect the quality of our sleep from side effects of medications, sleep apnoea, prostate or incontinence troubles, stimulants from food or beverages we consume or even restless leg syndrome.

Lack of good quality sleep can exacerbate some of these issues resulting in a vicious cycle. Lack of good quality sleep may cause irritability, depression, weight issues and possibly make you more prone to illnesses and accidents.  One of the most common causes of poor sleep quality is stress.  Some people reading this article will wake at night tossing, turning and stressing about how to have quality sleep. As I said it’s a vicious cycle.

So what to do?  I’m always a believer in looking at lifestyle changes to help you so try going to the bed and waking at the same time every day.  TV and computers may be too stimulating for your brain so choose another activity to wind down with at night.  If your nocturnal mental ramblings are the culprit get up and write them down, then tell yourself you will ‘deal’ with them tomorrow.   Don’t look at the clock when you wake – it sets your mind alarm into the pattern of always waking at that time.  Decrease the amount of liquid you consume a couple of hours prior to going to bed to reduce the need to pay a penny during the night. Investing in a body pillow to wrap yourself around may help with your physical aches and pains.  Talk to your naturopath or GP about your need for magnesium and calcium which may alleviate those restless legs and ask if your other medications may be adding to your sleep woes.  Put a peg over your husbands (or your) nose to prevent the snoring – just kidding. Talk to your GP about this problem as it may be more serious than you think.  If you’re a Nana napper,  rethink or reduce your nap duration.     Avoid caffeine and sugar at bedtime and get your stimulus from daily exercise and a good old fashion dose of direct sunshine to help with your wake/sleep cycle.

If all else fails have some peace of mind in knowing that people who say they ‘sleep like a baby’ probably don’t have one or remember what it was like, to have had one.

Over 50’s Fitness by Glen Barnett – Falls Prevention

March 15, 2016

senior-woman-breaking-hip
To fall or not to fall?    It’s not really a hard question to answer. I know I want to stay upright for as many years as I can. As you age you may have heard “ I’ve finally got my head together and now my body is falling apart”.    It doesn’t have to be that way but it is important to be aware that statistics show the risk of falling escalates around 65 years of age.   Falls prevention should start as young as 40+.

Causes
Deteriorated/deteriorating health – weight gain, blood pressure issues etc
Flexibility, mobility and strength loss associated with inactive ageing.
Lack of exercise leading to impaired balance – weakened core and stabilising muscles.
Gait changes eg shuffling walk and not lifting your feet.
Impaired visual acuity – bifocals, dim lighting, bright sunshine.
Environmental
Inappropriate footwear – thongs, slippers and loosely laced shoes
People traffic – busy shopping centres
Unfamiliar environment – creates caution and confusion
Uneven, loose or slippery floors – at home, foot paths, wet areas
How to prevent falls
Increasing muscle strength, flexibility and bone density and
Improving balance and gait.

The first step, starting today,  is to increase the strength and endurance in your legs because if they give way the only way you will be going is down.  Try the following movement opportunities:
Walking – anywhere
In the house, in the street
Parks the Jetty and Harbour area
With a friend or go solo

Then increase the intensity by:
Finding a gentle hill to walk up
Walking faster
Increase the distance
Picking up a dancing class or two
Attending classes specifically older adults

Next Increase your leg strength.  As I have said in previous articles, you lose 10% of muscle up to 55 then 40% more after that. Try some:
Step ups
Wall push ups
Rows with some cans, hand weights or resistance bands
Seated squats.
Don’t ignore your balance:
Try  hanging on to a table/ wall, standing on one leg, and as your balance improves you will find you can release your death grip.  Prepare your body for falling and you will find you don’t fall as easily as you think you will.

Stay active.  Keep moving.  Get out of the lounge chair.

Oh and by the way make sure you keep getting down on to the ground so you can practise getting up . You don’t want to be in a situation that if you do fall you can’t get up.  To summarize:
if you don’t use it you will lose it; and
falls prevention requires your attention!

Call Glen or Jacqui on 66586222 to organise a free session at Coffs Coast Health Club.

7 Ways to Stay Calm in the Midst of Chaos & Stress

January 30, 2016

How To Rejuvenate, Stay Calm Amidst Chaos and Extreme Stress

how to rejuvenateSometime life navigates chaotic, stressful times – like a wild ride on a runaway roller coaster. You become depleted due to relationship issues, or problems that erupt due to your children (no matter how old they are). Perhaps you’re sagging due to a festering illness, either your own or an illness of a close family member – a parent, a sibling, or a child. Or you face the sting of losing your job, your home or even your adored pet. Your mind is galloping, your world is reeling.

How can you carry on when you face drastic changes in your life and a grave sense of loss?  Debilitating fear envelops you. As a result, many people fall into negative behaviours such as excessive drinking, gambling, binge eating or illicit drugs to banish troubles in order to cope. These tactics, initially a way of bolting from the problem, eventually culminate in other devastating problems later on.

The following are some strategies to keep you balanced, calm, even in times of extreme stress and chaos. No, you will not banish stressful events, however, your coping abilities and confidence will be strengthened and enhanced as you become more grounded, in control and in charge.

7 Effective Stress Management Tips for a Calmer You

  1. Realize you can’t control everything. Some things have a life of their own and must take their own course. Pray, cry, shriek or stamp – then reflect upon what you can and cannot control. Notice the underlying root of your stress – is it fear, anxiety for the future, a feeling of ‘it’s not fair!’, or is it grief?
  2. Embrace help from someone you trust. Call a professional psychologist, a good friend or relative, a religious leader or your doctor or other health professional. Know you will be okay no matter what happens.
  3. Don’t hibernate. If possible, get outside for a walk and envelop nature. Immediately stress chemicals are dissolved when you move your body and surround yourself with natural elements.
  4. Instead of drinking coffee or alcohol that tend to dehydrate, overexcite or make mayhem – drink water or green tea to energize you. Instead of binge eating, protect your immune system and banish bad moods with a protein snack paired with a carbohydrate such as cheese and crackers, a turkey sandwich, eggs and toast, nuts and fruit. The amino acids in the protein will pleasantly reward your brain as well as nourish it. Pairing protein with a carbohydrate will revive and calm you at the same time and help you plot your course of action. Carbohydrates include potato, rice, whole grain bread or cracker, vegetables or fruit.
  5. Luxuriate with deep breathing techniques to overcome muscle tension and relax the mind and body. Sit quietly, with your feet firmly planted on the floor. Notice your breath going in and out. For further repair and relaxation, take a slow, deep belly breath. Count to 4 slowly as you inhale and exhale. Think “I Am Calm” as you breathe out, giving your mind the vacation it needs. Repeat for a few minutes. Music that soothes you enhances the relaxation.
  6. Other ways to relax include rejuvenating with a massage or soaking in a tub. Slow down and renew by being more mindful of all your actions, especially when driving. Recoup by resting when you’re tired.
  7. At this time, resolve to review your commitments. Pare them down to protect yourself against feeling suffocated or overburdened. Practice saying “NO”. Don’t self-destruct with overcommit, even if it makes you feel guilty! Enlist help. When you’re in a chaotic period in your life, suppress the urge to do everything yourself.
    Article sourced from: http://www.healthinharmony.com/rejuvenate-stay-calm-amidst-chaos-extreme-stress

Fitness starting with your Feet

November 29, 2015

Our feet and ankles are very important, considering we couldn’t stand, walk, run, or roundhouse kick someone in the face without them. Unfortunately, our lower limbs tend to be neglected unless something goes wrong.

Strong and flexible feet, ankles, and calves provide our base for stable movement, and are essential for performing our daily activities without pain or strain. In this article, I will give you a brief introduction to the the basic anatomy and movements in the ankle and foot (just enough for a good familiarity, but not enough for you to perform surgery…). Then, I’ll discuss the primary importance of working on this area, and finally, how to incorporate exercises for these areas into your training routine.

Your lower leg is made up of the bigger tibia on the inside and the smaller fibula on the outside, then connects lower down to the talus and the calcaneus (heel), then to the five small bones of the instep and the metatarsals and phalanges (your toes).

Lots of different sized ligaments connect the bones together for stability, along with various muscles from the big calf to the small muscles that move your toes.

Foot Anatomy

The ankle and foot is made to move in a great variety of angles to provide stability and dexterity, carrying us over all types of terrain from soft sand to rocky ground. Your ankle is not like a hinge on a door, and your foot isn’t just one big lump you slide your socks onto.

All the large and small joints in this area work together to provide this nimbleness, but only if we keep them moving like they are supposed to!

Your Lower Legs Work Hard for You – Here’s What They Do

Jump RopeOur calves (the bigger gastrocnemius and smaller, deeper soleus muscles) point the foot down, giving us the power to rise up on our toes and assist with running and jumping. But even with the foot flat on the ground, our calves provide stability in squatting, lunging, and other big movements.

On the front and sides of the shin are the anterior tibialis, posterior tibialis, and peronei muscles, which provide stability like stirrups and slings, and also the fine motor control that keeps us balanced and steady.

Down into the foot are many small muscles that control our arches and toes. These foot intrinsic muscles are the most at risk for atrophy from disuse when we don’t actively get out of our shoes and move our feet as we’re meant to do.

What Can Go Wrong in the Foot and Ankle

With all this considered, it’s easy to see the complexity of large and small muscles and joints working together to keep us upright and walking, as well as running, jumping, and balancing.

The coordination and differentiation of all these possible movements is key to foot and ankle control, and to moving freely and gracefully through your feet.

It’s also likely why we hear so many complaints about stiff ankles and feet.

If the smaller muscles are too weak to support your foot and ankle, your body reacts by increasing the tension where it can, in the bigger muscles. The tightness in the calf and ankle is then a protective mechanism that stretching may help a bit, but improved control and strength in the foot would solve.

Another common issue people experience is collapse arches in the feet. This is caused by poor mobility in the midfoot, along with weak posterior tibialis and intrinsic muscles. With improved mobility and strength in these areas, the arches should correct themselves over time.

Below we’ll discuss a variety of exercises with an emphasis on coordination and dexterity to wake up dormant muscles and restore proper mobility and control over this important area.

8 Exercises for Building Strength and Motor Control in the Feet and Ankles

The exercises we show here have an emphasis on active movement in various angles and ranges of motion.

A lot of people don’t fully explore the movement our feet and ankles are capable of, and this results in stiffness and weakness. The first step is knowing that it is actually possible to move this way, and the next and best step is to practice!

 

Below, we’ll look at each of these exercises in detail so you can understand the mechanics and benefits of each exercise, as well as programming recommendations.

1. Foot Circles with Toes Flexed (Curled)

Foot 1This movement concentrates on the small muscles in the arch of the foot. These foot intrinsicssupport the foot, and control over them means improved control and dexterity, which is so important in graceful and athletic movement.

It’s a simple movement – it’s just making a circle! – but the addition of flexing your toes makes this surprisingly difficult and can lead to muscle cramping in the beginning. Start off by not flexing your toes strongly and do the circles slowly.

Do 10-15 reps in each direction for 2-3 sets.

2. Toe and Ankle Movement Coordination

Foot 2Here is another simple movement that works on coordinating the use of the muscles of the lower leg and foot. Simply lift your foot up and down through your full range of motion and add the toe movements with it as well.

The coordination is toe extension (lifting toes upward) as you lift your foot upward, and toe flexion (curling in) as you point your foot down. And the other variation is then flexing your toes down as you lift your foot upward, and extending your toes as you point your foot down.

Do 10 repetitions of both variations for 2 sets.

3. Diagonal Patterns

Foot 3These are combined motion patterns of either your foot lifting up and rolling inward and then pointing down and outward; or your foot lifting up and rolling outward and then pointing down and inward. You are essentially tracing an X with your foot as you work on the coordination of ankle and foot motions.

This can be another surprisingly difficult exercise and is extremely useful for learning how your ankle can move.

Do 10-20 reps for 2-3 sets.

4. Rolling up Onto the Toes

Foot 4This is the first exercise where we are putting weight onto our feet.

The goal here is to combine a loaded active stretch to the ankle and foot together. It’s a dynamic move, so don’t hold too long in any position, instead go slowly through the full range and back again to encourage active movement through all the positions.

Do 5-8 reps for 3 sets.

5. Squats with Ankle Rotation

Foot 5In this exercise, don’t worry if you can’t drop down into the full deep squat position. The purpose of this exercise is to practice rolling on the inside and outside of your feet while weightbearing in a “compromising” position.

If you were to run and unexpectedly roll onto the side of your foot, you’d likely get a nasty ankle sprain. The exercise shown here is a progressive way to practice these common stresses to your feet and ankles. You can control the pressure and stress of the movement and use it to strengthen these positions to make it less likely to be severely injured when it unexpectedly happens.

Do 5-8 reps for 3 sets.

6. Ankle Rolling Side-to-Side

Ankle RollingHere we move to standing and up on the ball of the foot as we practice rolling our ankle from side to side.

Again, it’s better to do this while we are controlling the forces so we can strengthen them, rather than having it happen randomly and possibly causing injury.

Do 5-8 reps for 3 sets.

7. Weightbearing Ankle Circles on the Heel/Ball of Foot

Foot 7Continuing in standing, we’ll now practice ankle circles while placing as much weight as we are comfortable with on either our heels or on the ball of the foot.

There are different forces and strains involved in the two variations, so it’s good to familiarize yourself with both.

Do 10 reps in each direction for 2 sets.

8. Calf Raises

Calf RaisesAnother classic exercise, this is the most direct way of strengthening the calf muscles in their full range of motion from a full stretch to a full contraction. You can adjust your intensity by how much you hold on with your hands and by eventually adding weight to your body through a backpack or holding dumbbells.

If this is too much for you, then work both feet at the same time or start on a flat floor versus a step to reduce the range of motion until you get stronger and can handle strengthening from the full stretch.

Do 8-12 reps for 3 sets.

Fundamental Calf Stretches for Flexible Lower Legs

Calf StretchA very common complaint we hear from people is their lack of ankle flexibility.

Many bodyweight exercise moves, especially as you move into intermediate and advanced work, such as the pistol squat and various locomotive patterns, require good ankle flexibility.

The calf muscles are a very dense muscle group because we use them constantly – even just in standing and walking. And the ankle joints,  because of the lack of variety of motion throughout the day, tend to be stiff and immobile. This can require aggressive stretching, in terms of load, not intensity, to achieve improvements in range of motion.

A classic and effective exercise is using a step or sturdy block for your foot so you can drop your heel down to stretch.

It’s simple, not fancy, but works extremely well if you are consistent and approach it the right way. I recommend doing this in shoes, in this way you can place the middle of your foot on the edge of the step comfortably for the stretch. This is protective of your foot arch and allows you to put more weight into the stretch.

 

The variations are with your knee locked out straight and with your knee bent. The straight leg version emphasizes more of a gastrocnemius stretch, and the bent knee version gives the calf muscles a bit of slack and thus puts more of a stretch in the ankle joint.

The calf responds well to long holds of stretching, so 1 to 2 minutes for 3 sets should be a minimum goal. Stretch before active movement such as the strength and motor control exercises above so that your body learns to adjust and retain the new range of motion from the stretching.

Self-Massage Techniques for Healthy Feet, Ankles, and Calves

Self MassageA bit of self massage work is very useful in the lower leg and foot to loosen some tension prior to stretching and exercise.

The massage itself doesn’t make you more flexible, but it does temporarily help you feel less tight and gives you a window of opportunity to stretch further with less discomfort.

Just make sure not to overdo it, the trick is to apply just enough pressure to ease tension, not push as hard as you can to force it to happen!

 

Starting at the foot, work along the sole along the contours of the bones and feel the small muscles in you feet, keep the pressure light at first then gradually increase the pressure. If you are doing it correctly you’ll notice an easing off of tension in the muscles. You can then add more pressure and continue if you feel you need it, or move on to the next area.

Move on to the sides of your shin, into the calf and the front of your shin. The calf can be especially sore to massage deeply, so be aware of this and go gradually until you get accustomed to the pressure.

You can also use a ball to change the pressure and get into the muscles from a different angle.

Along with being mindful of gradually increasing pressure, you should limit your time on self massage to no more than 5 minutes. Too much of a good thing is still too much. And it is much more valuable to spend the majority of your time on active exercise.

Keep Your Feet Healthy for a Lifetime

Our ankles and feet are too often under-exercised and taken for granted considering how much we rely on them everyday. It’s no surprise that this neglect of their full range of motion and total potential for coordinated movement can lead to stiffness and weakness, and perhaps even pain.

This article focused on simple, yet effective exercises that not only lessen the chances of potential injury, but may also reverse some damage that has already been done (barring any true injuries in need of surgery or more intensive therapy).

Spend 5-10 minutes on these exercises every day, and you’re likely to feel your feet getting stronger, more flexible, and more able to handle variations in movement.

 

Article Sourced from: https://gmb.io/feet/

 

Over 50’s Fitness by Glen Barnett – Exercise as a Tonic

November 24, 2015

exercise tonic

Like a spoonful of sugar makes the medicine go down, a dose of exercise is the best tonic for mental (and physical) wellness.

Lets put aside the obvious medical conditions that we already know are benefitted by exercise and look at another condition –  menopause.

Menopause  is a very challenging time for women with a lot of hormonal, physical and mental changes occurring at once without warning and often leaving the woman with no idea when they will end.  Trying to ‘stay sane’ during this period of a woman’s life is how some women describe their battle with a body that is not doing what it has done all their lives. Menopause brings with it a body that is laying down fat in different areas; a body that the woman doesn’t often recognise as the one she’s ‘grown up’ with.   The benefits of exercise on our mental state during this time, can have an overriding effect on the physical symptoms that may present.

Exercise, relaxation and breathing exercises assist in helping the menopausal woman feel that she is taking back some control of the unpredictability of her menopausal symptoms.  The relaxation and the breathing give her strategies to deal with the mood swings and hot flushes. The exercise (and also dietary guidance) assists with the changes in her body weight and body fat placement and the stretching helps relieve discomfort in joints and muscles that often feel stiffer through this stage of life.

Never underestimate the benefit of a walk in the park or on the beach or just around the block, a good stretching session,  and/or an upside down yoga class.  Be proactive and make exercise your tonic to wellness.

At Coffs Coast Health Club we can really help you achieve the benefits I’ve described in this article. Give Glen or Jacqui a call on 66586222 for a free chat and let’s see how we can help you.

Over 50’s Fitness by Glen Barnett – 10 Ways to Stay Healthy this Summer

September 29, 2015

Ok I’ve been asked again to write my top 10 ways to stay healthy this summer.  We’re having a great summer season so use my tips to make sure yours is the healthiest ever.

  1. Activity guidelines for Australians recommend a minimum of 30 minutes of moderate physical activity most days.  So as well as doing some structured exercise get outside and go for a swim, surf, bush walk, bike ride or even a kayak.
  2. Remember the Slip, Slop, Slap and Wrap Campaign.  Slip on a shirt, slop on the sunscreen, slap on a hat and wrap on some sunnies.
  3. Stay as cool as a cucumber.  Eating cucumber after you workout will help bring your body temperature back to normal.
  4. After your workout try room temperature water rather than drinking a cold drink which will interfere with your body’s natural cooling mechanism (sweat).
  5. Match your workout to the temperature and the time of day you’re going to be active.  For instance don’t go for your power walk in the middle of a hot day get up earlier and hit the pavement then. Try swimming later in the day so you’re left refreshed and relaxed and ready for a good night’s sleep.
  6. Can’t sleep on these warm nights?  Prepare yourself and your boudoir for the night. Use a fan, remove some of your bedding, sprinkle some lavender on your pillow to promote relaxation, enjoy a cool shower just before you hop into bed and enjoy the cool fan on your body as you drift off.
  7. When you wake in the morning enjoy a large glass of room temperature water mixed with some lemon juice and then throughout your day make sure hydration is at the top of your list.  If you feel hungry check you’re not thirsty. A lot of people mistake thirst for hunger and during summer you don’t need those extra calories but you do need that extra hydration.
  8. Remember winter immunity starts in summer so enjoy raw salads or steamed veges to get the best nutrients. Include foods that are H2O rich like cucumber,  carrots, steamed zucchini and melons to fill you up and keep your kjs down.
  9. Don’t like daylight saving?  Try to get atleast 15minutes of direct sunlight each day because before you know it the days will be shorter and our Vitamin D levels will be diminishing.
  10. Last but not least – smile.  If you can’t smile fake it.  Laughing and smiling release feel good healthy hormones which will definitely serve you well every day of summer and into those autumn days to come.

Want a FREE Workout?
Give Glen or Jacqui a call at Coffs Coast Health Club on 6658 6222 or organise.

Top tips for getting fit (if you’re not much of an athlete)

September 13, 2015

fit
If you’re not much of an athlete right now, here are some ideas to help you get in shape.

Your running shoes/tennis racquet/softball glove/high-school sports trophy collection are tucked into the back of some closet, quietly gathering dust. Nowadays your main form of exercise is walking between the couch and the fridge. You’re handier with the remote than you are with a racquet.

And yet … you’d like to be in better shape. Maybe even train in a particular sport. Maybe even compete in the Senior Games. Crazy, right — at your age?

Nope. You’re never too old for physical activity, said Mary Frances Visser, a professor of human performance at Mankato State University who researches the effects of exercise on older adults.

“Physiologically there are no real limits,” said Visser, an associate editor for the Journal of Aging and Physical Activity. “You’re limited by your own physiology in certain ways, but in terms of saying ‘Nobody over the age of 60 should ever do X’ — that’s nuts.”

Aging itself can bring upon a desire for better health, said Gary Westlund, founder and president of Charities Challenge, a nonprofit that sponsors races focusing on health issues.

“It’s a very common experience that people, when they get into their 60s and even 70s, one of their motivations is, ‘I want to be a better man this year than I was last year,’ That includes, of course, ‘I want to be healthier, fitter, I want to run faster, row faster,’” said Westlund, who is certified as a health and fitness specialist by the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM).

Exercise is especially important as you get older because physically fit people are better able to cope with, and heal from, health challenges that accompany aging.

Even if you’re already experiencing some of those challenges — even if you basically haven’t risen from the couch since George Bush Sr. was president — it is possible to get back what you have lost.

Visser knows a woman who “was a total couch potato all of her life” until, at 55, she decided to compete in the Senior Games in the 50-yard dash. She spent a year training and eventually “wound up medaling in the 100-yard dash in the National Senior Games.”

Westlund met an 85-year-old runner at his organization’s Challenge Aging 5K race last fall.

“It was his first road race I believe, or one of his first road races. He had taken up running at 83. He had the fastest 5K time in Minnesota last year — at any 5K — for a man 85 or older.”

This year’s Minnesota Senior Games are May 28 to 31 — probably too tight a deadline if you’re just now lacing up a new pair of sneakers. But you could start training for next year, Visser said. (And next year’s state games are qualifiers for the nationals.)

If you have a medical condition — high blood pressure, diabetes, heart history problems, joint disease — check with your doctor, Westlund said. Otherwise, women up to age 55 and men up to 45 can probably start doing light to moderate exercise without the doctor’s green light. Information about aging and physical activity is available at the ACSM’s website (www.acsm.org), the National Institutes of Health’s Senior Health site (www.nihseniorhealth.gov/exerciseforolderadult) and the National Institute on Aging’s site (www.nia.nih.gov/health/publication/exercise-physical-activity/introduction).

When you first start, don’t expect to whip yourself into shape in a week. “The human body at 20 and the human body at 50 are very different,” Visser said. “You can really, really hurt yourself if you do too much too soon.”

Visser recommends starting with five minutes of activity and working up to eight, then 10 and on up to at least 30. Add weightlifting, stretching and so on to regain muscle mass, flexibility and balance.

Article sourced here:  http://www.startribune.com/lifestyle/goodlife/300831881.html

Over 50’s Fitness by Glen Barnett – Exercise as a Medicine

August 18, 2015

exercise2Here is a concept that I really want you to consider, I want you to view exercise and being active as medicine, a dose of goodness to manage your health, weight and wellness.  It has been proven over and over that as a preventative measure to ill health and as a ‘cure’ for a lot of ailments, exercise is the best medicine around.

So if we know that this ‘medicine’ called exercise can have such a positive effect on our well being then why isn’t everyone taking their daily dose?   Who knows maybe fear, laziness or indecision?  Here’s some help.

Start with a goal and see your goal as being your dessert – something you’re really looking forward to but you need to earn it.   Get to your goal in small bite size pieces. If your goal is to drop 20kg then plot some smaller increments in your calendar rather than the big figure down the track.

Make sure you get your exercise dosage correct so get some guidance.  It is important to know how much exercise should be ‘absorbed’ to give you the maximum benefit for your goal.  Exercise should be prescribed in a specific dose you know that works for you including type, intensity, frequency and duration.  Definitely sample different types of exercise medicine, until you’ve found what ‘medicinal remedy’ fits best with you or is easiest to swallow.   Basically make sure the exercise you ‘take’ is something you enjoy and something that is going to help you get to your goal.

Make a commitment to your health, yourself and your future. Taking a daily dose of  exercise medicine in some way nearly every day will lead to a positive lifestyle change and a very healthy habit

So if you decide you want to get a dose of one of the best medicines for your health, call me, “Dr” Glen, at Coffs Coast Health Club on 66586222 and we can organise a FREE prescription to get you started.

Over 50’s Fitness by Glen Barnett – Exercise as a Tonic

August 11, 2015

menopause
Like a spoonful of sugar makes the medicine go down, a dose of exercise is the best tonic for mental (and physical) wellness.

Lets put aside the obvious medical conditions that we already know are benefitted by exercise and look at another condition –  menopause.

Menopause  is a very challenging time for women with a lot of hormonal, physical and mental changes occurring at once without warning and often leaving the woman with no idea when they will end.  Trying to ‘stay sane’ during this period of a woman’s life is how some women describe their battle with a body that is not doing what it has done all their lives. Menopause brings with it a body that is laying down fat in different areas; a body that the woman doesn’t often recognise as the one she’s ‘grown up’ with.   The benefits of exercise on our mental state during this time, can have an overriding effect on the physical symptoms that may present.

Exercise, relaxation and breathing exercises assist in helping the menopausal woman feel that she is taking back some control of the unpredictability of her menopausal symptoms.  The relaxation and the breathing give her strategies to deal with the mood swings and hot flushes. The exercise (and also dietary guidance) assists with the changes in her body weight and body fat placement and the stretching helps relieve discomfort in joints and muscles that often feel stiffer through this stage of life.

Never underestimate the benefit of a walk in the park or on the beach or just around the block, a good stretching session,  and/or an upside down yoga class.  Be proactive and make exercise your tonic to wellness.

At Coffs Coast Health Club we can really help you achieve the benefits I’ve described in this article. Give Glen or Jacqui a call on 66586222 for a free chat and let’s see how we can help you.