Archive for October, 2016

19 Documentaries That Will Have An Impact On Your Life

October 30, 2016

open-your-mind
Documentaries hold a power unique to any other type of film.

They have the remarkable capacity to shift our understanding of the vast and complex world in which we live, most of the time presenting us with powerfully relevant information, a previously unknown perspective, and hopefully, a new choice to make a difference.

The following list of documentaries showcases films that may inspire a new outlook on the world we live in. There were so many to choose from that compiling this list proved challenging, however, each one of these films stands as prudent commentaries offering valuable insight into the wonders and workings of the world at large. Enjoy!

1)  Hungry For Change

“Hungry For Change exposes shocking secrets the diet, weight loss and food industry don’t want you to know about; deceptive strategies designed to keep you coming back for more. Find ut what’s keeping you from having the body and health you deserve and how to escape the diet trap forever.”

2)  Fed Up

“Everything we’ve been told about food and exercise for the past 30 years is dead wrong. FED UP is the film the food industry doesn’t want you to see. From Katie Couric, Laurie David (Oscar winning producer of AN INCONVENIENT TRUTH) and director Stephanie Soechtig, FED UP will change the way you eat forever.”

3)  Tiny

“TINY is a documentary about home, and how we find it. The film follows one couple’s attempt to build a “tiny house” from scratch, and profiles other families who have downsized their lives into homes smaller than the average parking space. Through homes stripped down to their essentials, the film raises questions about good design, the nature of home, and the changing American Dream.”

4) Cosmos

” ‘Family Guy’ creator Seth MacFarlane, in a departure from the type of material he is best known for, pays homage to Carl Sagan’s award-winning and iconic ‘Cosmos’ with this docu-series. Through stories of humankind’s quest for knowledge, viewers travel across the universe. Scientific concepts are presented clearly, with both skepticism and wonder, to impart their full impact. Renowned astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson hosts, and Sagan’s original creative collaborator, Ann Druyan, serves as an executive producer.”

5) Fat, Sick & Nearly Dead

“100 pounds overweight, loaded up on steroids and suffering from a debilitating autoimmune disease, Joe Cross is at the end of his rope and the end of his hope. In the mirror he saw a 310lb man whose gut was bigger than a beach ball and a path laid out before him that wouldn’t end well— with one foot already in the grave, the other wasn’t far behind. FAT, SICK & NEARLY DEAD is an inspiring film that chronicles Joe’s personal mission to regain his health.”

6. Forks Over Knives

“Forks Over Knives examines the profound claim that most, if not all, of the degenerative diseases that afflict us can be controlled, or even reversed, by rejecting our present menu of animal-based and processed foods. The major storyline in the film traces the personal journeys of a pair of pioneering yet under-appreciated researchers, Dr. T. Colin Campbell and Dr. Caldwell Esselstyn.”

7) Cowspiracy

“Cowspiracy: The Sustainability Secret is a groundbreaking feature-length environmental documentary following intrepid filmmaker Kip Andersen as he uncovers the most destructive industry facing the planet today – and investigates why the world’s leading environmental organizations are too afraid to talk about it.”

8) In Plane Sight

“911: In Plane Site: Director’s Cut is a 2004 documentary which promotes 9/11 conspiracy theories. Photographs and video footage from the September 11 attacks are presented and the documentary claims that the public was not given all of the facts surrounding the terrorist attack.”

9) Pump

“This is the movie that will change your attitude about fuel forever. PUMP is an inspiring, eye-opening documentary that tells the story of America’s addiction to oil, from Standard Oil’s illegal tactics to the monopoly oil companies enjoy today. The film explains clearly and simply how we can end this monopoly — and finally win choice at the pump.”

10) The Human Experiment

“The Human Experiment lifts the veil on the shocking reality that thousands of untested chemicals are in our everyday products, our homes and inside of us. Simultaneously, the prevalence of many diseases continues to rise. From Oscar® winner Sean Penn and Emmy® winning journalists Dana Nachman and Don Hardy, The Human Experiment tells the personal stories of people who believe their lives have been affected by chemicals and takes viewers to the front lines as activists go head-to-head with the powerful and well-funded chemical industry. These activists bring to light a corrupt system that’s been hidden from consumers… until now.”

Have you seen any movies on Netflix lately that you feel deserve to be on this list? Please mention them in the comments section below!

Much Love

Documentaries hold a power unique to any other type of film.

They have the remarkable capacity to shift our understanding of the vast and complex world in which we live, most of the time presenting us with powerfully relevant information, a previously unknown perspective, and hopefully, a new choice to make a difference.

The following list of documentaries showcases films that may inspire a new outlook on the world we live in. There were so many to choose from that compiling this list proved challenging, however, each one of these films stands as prudent commentaries offering valuable insight into the wonders and workings of the world at large. Enjoy!

11) Life: The BBC Mini-Series

A vast majority of people live their lives exiled from the wonders of nature and the myriad of living creatures that inhabit our incredibly diverse biosphere. Not to worry, however, as this wonder is magnificently captured in the 2009 BBC mini-series, Life. 

Shot in crystal clear high-definition and narrated by the world’s most beloved narrator himself, David Attenborough, the series chronicles some of the most unusual, if not downright bizarre, behaviors that living organisms have devised to keep their species alive. The massive project took 4 years to shoot and put together, taking brave camera crews across every continent and habitat imaginable. Get your popcorn ready and prepare for your mind to be blown. 

12) The Zeitgeist Trilogy

Commonly pegged as the films that ignited a global awakening, the Zeitgeist Trilogy quickly opened a public discourse into the largest “conspiracies” to brace the modern day world. Narrated by the enigmatic filmmaker and social activist, Peter Joseph, the film audaciously exposes the high-ordered corruption in all aspects of finance, religion, and politics today, inspiring the masses to open their eyes to the the inner workings of the global tyranny ruling our world. The series leaves the viewer with a whetted appetite for more, making this documentary film series a can of worms only for the brave and ready.

13) The Square

By now, we have undoubtedly heard about the horrendous ongoing conflict in Egypt through the mainstream lens, but rarely have we gotten the chance to see an inside perspective from the men, women and children who are actually experiencing the carnage and chaos. The 2013 documentary, The Square, does just this. Audiences get a compelling inside look at the cascading series of revolutions and counter-revolutions that have shaken Egypt since the beginning of 2011, shattering routine bias commonly imposed by the mainstream media. We see the humanness of the Egyptian conflict like never before, a frightening reality that reminds us of the possibilities any country could experience in the face of governmental defiance.

14) I Am

Known for his clever knack for ridiculous humour, filmmaker Tom Shadyac’s resume of films include blockbuster hits like The Nutty Professor, Ace Ventura: Pet Detective, and Bruce Almighty. But after a 2007 biking accident left him with a series of insistent headaches and a painful sensitivity to light, Tom was forced to spend a 6-month period bed-ridden, in complete darkness.

Once Tom recovered, he found himself with a new perspective and a slew of burning questions about life. This prompted his journey into the realm of documentary film-making, spawning the film I Am. The film asks two central questions: “What’s Wrong With the World?” and “What Can We Do About it?”, picking the brains of a cast of intriguing and insightful public figures. The themes explored in I Am make important food for thought for everyone.

15) Samsara

Samsara also made a previous list of life changing films we wrote about, seen here, due to its success in capturing the unfathomable reaches of humanity’s spirituality and the human experience. Neither a traditional documentary nor a travelogue, Samsara takes the form of a nonverbal, visionary inspired guided meditation. From the mundane to the extraordinary, prepare for a journey around the world like nothing you’ve seen before.

16) Earthlings

Coming in at number 5 is a film that changed my life only 20 minutes in. Earthlings is one of those films you cannot walk away from unaffected, exposing a reality so often swept under the rug by most. Some of the largest industries in our world today operate from the exploitation and slaughter of billions of animals annually, and this film exposes these gruesome and oft-ignored facets of society.

The film does well at showing how all living beings on this planet are ‘earthlings,’ and that somewhere along the way we’ve severed our connection to animals to a sadistic degree. If you are ready, watch this film and prepare for a massive wake-up call.

17) Life In A Day

Life In A Day takes the number 3 spot for a few reasons. The first reason is due to it’s incredibly original concept – an arranged series of video clips selected from 80,000 clips submitted to YouTube, the clips showing respective occurrences from around the world on a single day, July 24, 2010. The second reason is due to the sheer magnitude and global perspective it provides the audience with.

The film leaves you with a feeling of connectedness, having seen the diversity and rawness of humanity and the windows into different lives, capturing moments humourous and sad, ordinary and momentous.

18) Revolution

Revolutoin

Revolution is an urgent call to action over the looming ecological collapse. It presents the idea that all of our actions are interconnected and that environmental degradation, species loss, ocean acidification, pollution, and scarcity of food and water are limiting, even reducing, the Earth’s ability to support humans.

What is particularly important about this film is the director’s passion to get this message across to our youth, the ones who will be left to deal with the mess of previous generation’s decisions. Revolution is a film that should no doubt be mandatory for high school and university students to watch, whence the future policy makers emerge, to hopefully one day make a difference.

19) Planet Earth

What other documentary would you expect to take the top spot on our list other than BBC`s Planet Earth? The series is probably the most breath-taking visualization of our planet ever conceptualized.

Comprised of eleven episodes, each features a global overview of a different biome or habitat on Earth captured in stunning high-definition. Planet Earth comes in at number one for the sole reason that it gives us a truly epic perspective on the world we live in, and reminds us of how freaking awesome and sacred our planet truly is.

 


Free 10 Day Screening: Oct 20th – Nov 5th!

The Sacred Science follows eight people from around the world, with varying physical and psychological illnesses, as they embark on a one-month healing journey into the heart of the Amazon jungle.

You can watch this documentary film FREE for 10 days by clicking here.

“If “Survivor” was actually real and had stakes worth caring about, it would be what happens here, and “The Sacred Science” hopefully is merely one in a long line of exciting endeavors from this group.” – Billy Okeefe, McClatchy Tribune

This info sourced from: http://www.collective-evolution.com/2016/05/18/looking-for-a-good-documetary-here-are-19-that-will-have-an-impact-on-your-life/

Advertisements

Healthy Inspirations Recipe of the Week – Madras Chicken Salad

October 27, 2016

hi

chicken-salad

Closest Thing to a Wonder Drug? Try Exercise

October 25, 2016

ec9fe3f8-6216-4ece-8c77-c4a53c567eea
After I wrote last year that diet, not exercise, was the key to weight loss, I was troubled by how some readers took this to mean that exercise therefore had no value.

Nothing could be further from the truth. Of all the things we as physicians can recommend for health, few provide as much benefit as physical activity.

In 2015, the Academy of Medical Royal Colleges put out a report calling exercise a “miracle cure.” This isn’t a conclusion based simply on some cohort or case-control studies. There are many, many randomized controlled trials. A huge meta-analysis examined the effect of exercise therapy on outcomes in people with chronic diseases.

Let’s start with musculoskeletal diseases. Researchers found 32 trials looking specifically at the effect of exercise on pain and function of patients with osteoarthritis of the knee alone. That’s incredibly specific, and it’s impressive that so much research has focused on one topic.

Exercise improved those outcomes. Ten more studies showed, over all, that exercise therapy increases aerobic capacity and muscle strength in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Other studies proved its benefits in other musculoskeletal conditions, like ankylosing spondylitis, and even some types of back pain.

For people (mostly middle-aged men) who had had a heart attack, exercise therapy reduced all causes of mortality by 27 percent and cardiac mortality by 31 percent. Fourteen additional controlled trials showed physiological benefits in those with heart failure. Exercise has also been shown to lower blood pressure in patients with hypertension, and improve cholesterol and triglyceride levels.

People with diabetes who exercise have lower HbA1c values, which is the marker of blood sugar control, low enough to probably reduce the risk of complications from the disease. Twenty randomized controlled trials have showed that patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease can walk farther and function better if they exercise.

Multiple studies have found that exercise improves physical function and health-related quality of life in people who have Parkinson’s disease. Six more studies showed that exercise improves muscle power and mobility-related activities in people with multiple sclerosis. It also appeared to improve those patients’ moods.

The overall results of 23 randomized controlled trials showed that exercise most likely improves the symptoms of depression. Five others appear to show that it improves symptoms in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome. In trials, exercise even lessened fatigue in patients who were having therapy for cancer.

What other intervention can claim results like these?

Even studies of older, hospitalized patients show a beneficial effect from multidisciplinary interventions that include exercise. Those randomized to such interventions in the hospital were more likely to be discharged to go home, and to spend less time in the hospital over all — and at a lower cost.

Although we don’t think of it this way, you can make a pretty good argument that exercise is as good as drugs for many conditions. A 2013 meta-analysis of meta-analyses (that’s how much data we have) combined and analyzed the results from 16 reviews of randomized controlled trials of drug and exercise interventions in reducing mortality. Collectively, these included 305 trials with almost 340,000 participants.

Diuretic drugs (but not all drugs) were shown to be superior to exercise in preventing death from heart failure. But exercise was found to be equally good as drugs in preventing mortality from coronary heart disease. Exercise was better than drugs in preventing death among patients from strokes.

Many people will be surprised at how little you need to do to achieve these results. Years ago, in an effort to get in shape, I tried the P90X routine. It proved too hard for me. Later, when I tried the Insanity workout, it beat me so badly that people at work kept asking me if I was ill. Two years ago, I tried P90X3. It was a bit more manageable, but I still couldn’t keep it up.

I have not been alone in thinking that physical activity to improve health should be hard. When I hear friends talk about exercising, they discuss running marathons, participating in CrossFit classes or sacrificing themselves on the altar of SoulCycle. That misses the point, unfortunately. All of these are much more than you need to do to get the benefits I’ve described.

The recommendations for exercise are 150 minutes per week of moderate intensity physical activity for adults, or about 30 minutes each weekday.

Moderate intensity is probably much less than you think. Walking briskly, at 3 to 4 miles per hour or so, qualifies. So does bicycling slower than 10 miles an hour. Anything that gets your heart rate somewhere between 110 and 140 beats per minute is enough. Even vacuuming, mowing the lawn or walking your dog might qualify.

Today, my goals are much more modest. Trekking from my office to the clinic and back again gives me 30 minutes of exercise. Or, I walk to the supermarket from my office to grab lunch, at a mile each way. In colder weather, I spend half an hour on the elliptical machine. Doing this five days a week gets me the activity I need.

Although it feels as if there’s nothing we can do to change people’s behavior, there is evidence to the contrary. A systematic review and meta-analysis of advice and counseling by health professionals found that promotion of physical activity works.

Doctors and clinics that made efforts to promote exercise to patients needed to engage 12 adults on the subject to get one additional adult to meet recommended levels of activity one year later. That might not sound impressive, but it’s one of the better such results.

After the Academy of Medical Royal Colleges wrote its report, an editorial in the BMJ, a prominent medical journal, countered that exercise wasn’t a “miracle cure.” Instead, the authors argued it was “the best buy for public health.”

If that’s the best “counterpoint,” then physical activity seems like a no-brainer.

Article sourced here:
http://www.nytimes.com/2016/06/21/upshot/why-you-should-exercise-no-not-to-lose-weight.html

Why Some People Can Eat More Carbs than Others

October 23, 2016

The concept that carbs are evil can be put to bed with one statement:

All vegetables and fruits are carbohydrates.

So it should come as no surprise that any diet attempting to completely purge carbohydrates—or anyone suggesting all carbs are evil—needs to take a step back, cut out the dogma, and take a hard look at reality and personal preference.

Few popular diets ever suggest you eat more carbs. Why is it they get such a bad reputation? There’s a huge gap between understanding foods that have healthy qualities (think micronutrients like vitamins and minerals) and foods that play a part in weight loss. While foods are digested differently, almost any food can be part of a weight-loss plan.

It’s why we’ve seen esteemed scientists eat a diet primarily of Twinkies to prove how dropping pounds can be turned into a mathematical equation.

That’s not an invitation to begin an all-snack-food diet. Instead, it’s context to finding the balance between eating foods you enjoy—like rice or potatoes—instead of having to follow a bland, frustrating diet that you inevitably abandon out of frustration and extreme hangriness. [Hangry (noun): that feeling of hungry that drives you to extreme levels of anger and/or becoming whiny.]

So let’s stop with the nonsense. Not all carbs are bad. At the same time, certain types of carbs can make it harder for you to look and feel the way you want, especially when you factor in your exercise behaviors.

Carb Resistance: It’s Real (and Imagined)

The biggest carbohydrate threat is to those with the “my body hates carbs” gene. These people appear allergic to carbs because, well, they are. Gluten sensitivity, food allergies, and inflammation make foods such as grains and bread a common enemy.

Even if you don’t suffer from any of those problems, you might find that when you eat more carbs, you feel bloated and fat—especially when those carbs come from sugar, candy, or lots of processed crap. (Think of foods that are manufactured and don’t have the best nutritional profile… instant mac and cheese, anyone?)

At the same time, the overreaction to carbs is oftentimes a by-product of a poorly designed diet.

Here’s what happens to most dieters:
Step 1: They “determine” carbs are bad.
Step 2: They remove all carbs.
Step 3: Weight loss occurs within the first one-to-two weeks. Sometimes quite a bit. But fat loss is not a rapid process. (Although it can be for people with lots to lose, like 50 to 100 pounds.) So what’s happening? Your body is dropping water weight because carbs hold water (but not necessarily in a bad way).
Step 4: Hunger and frustration builds, focus drops, and energy levels suffer. Eventually, you return to eating carbs after a period (usually about two weeks) of withdrawal. What happens? You might feel bloated, sick, and even see the scale dramatically shift.

The process plays out repeatedly, so let’s pump the breaks and solve the carb-sensitivity issue. When you reintroduce carbs after a no-carb period, many things happen in your body. At the most basic level, you’re replenishing your depleted carb stores and gaining back the water weight. The end result is thinking, “See, carbs are bad!” Which inevitably begins an ongoing struggle of figuring out what you can eat without being miserable.

What does it all mean? A dogmatic, black-and-white approach to carbs is hurting your understanding of what you can and can’t eat.

The Unfair Truth: Lean People Can Eat More Carbs

How many carbs you can eat and what you can tolerate is based on your body. It’s not a sexy answer, but it’s the truth.

You can’t assume that high-carb diets are bad just as you can’t assume that high-protein or high-fat diets are bad. Different types of diets work for different types of people. Part of it is how your body responds and another aspect is less physiological and more psychological. The physiological nature is oftentimes controlled by insulin, which, at the most basic level, is a storage hormone.

In general, the less body fat you carry, the better your insulin sensitivity, which means you can eat more carbs. (Your body doesn’t react as aggressively to larger amounts of carbohydrates, often viewed as surging blood sugar.) While insulin is important for weight loss and overall health, it’s not a black-and-white situation.

You can’t assume that high-carb diets are bad just as you can’t assume that high-protein or high-fat diets are bad. Different types of diets work for different types of people.

If you are more insulin resistant, it doesn’t mean you can’t lose weight, but it does have a big impact on the type of diet you should follow. If you’re more insulin sensitive (typically lower body fat), your body will respond better to a higher-carbohydrate diet. If you’re less sensitive (more resistant), then it can often feel like more carbs will go straight to your gut or your as*. And most of the time, it’s not just in your head.

Unfortunately, determining insulin levels isn’t an easy process and requires blood work, but you can see how your body reacts to higher-carb meals. The simplest test (although far from perfect) is consuming carbs in a post-workout period. Do you feel great or do you feel miserable and more bloated? If it’s the latter, either your insulin sensitivity isn’t great or you just ate too much.

more balanced (and successful) approach is to select a diet and then measure fat loss every two-to-four weeks (but not more frequently). Remember: Fat loss isn’t magic. If you think your insulin sensitivity is good, then you can start with about 50 percent of your diet from carbohydrates. If you’re not confident and worried you’re resistant—or know you have a lot of weight to lose—begin with about 20 to 30 percent of your calories from carbs.

Don’t Forget About Personality

The Paleo diet works for many people, but it’s not magic. Rather, removing carbs often means you’re eating fewer calories per day and focusing on a diet that consists of animal proteins, vegetables, and fruits. That’s definitely a recipe for success but not what is required to drop pounds. Not to mention, if you eat unlimited amounts of anything (even if it’s natural), you will gain weight.

The bigger issue with a no-carb approach is if it doesn’t consider the foods you love. Removing certain foods is one way to structure an eating plan. But if complete withdrawal pushes aggressively against personal preference, you’re setting yourself up for failure. Research has even shown that having dessert can help with weight loss. Case in point: Put a pasta lover on a Paleo diet and prepare for pain.

We want a flashy one-size-fits-all solution, but I’ve seen enough different diets work for different types of people to know that a broad generalization is not the solution. It’s actually the foundation of the problem. So we need to stop with the scare tactics and suggestions that might create imbalanced diets and do more harm than good.

How Do You Know Carbs Aren’t Really Bad?

There are many things in life we can’t explain with science. Or many things that science has yet to prove. (Or may never prove due to lack of funding, lack of interest, or just crappy studies. Hey, it happens.

However, when science does uncover some truths, it’s important they’re not ignored. In the case of carbs, insisting that “all carbs are bad” isn’t a fair conclusion that can be applied to everyone. (Side note: If you’re trying to build muscle, removing all carbs is potentially going to make the process harder too.)

“The idea that carbs are the enemy is a common appeal to emotion and popular folklore, rather than the full range of scientific evidence,” says Alan Aragon, M.S., a nutritionist in Westlake Village, CA.

The best example is this meta-analysis that compared the effects of low-carbohydrate diets and low-fat diets. Here’s what the researchers found:

1. Low-fat diets were slightly more effective at lowering total cholesterol and LDL.
2. Low-carb diets were more effective at increasing HDL and decreasing triglycerides
3. Neither diet was more effective than the other at reducing body weight, waist girth, blood pressure, glucose, and insulin levels.

This overall lack of differential effects led the authors to conclude that both low-carb and low-fat diets are viable options for reducing weight and improving metabolic risk factors, Aragon says. One of the strengths of this analysis was its large sample size: It included 23 trials from multiple countries and a total of 2,788 participants. Meaning this isn’t one small snippet of truth.

What’s more, the cuisines of some of the healthiest populations in the world consist of diets that have heavy carbohydrate components. The best examples are the Blue Zones, known as “longevity hotspots that have the longest life expectancies and the lowest rates of chronic and degenerative diseases,” Aragon says. The main energy sources for all of these Blue Zones are carbohydrates. Need more evidence? The top 10 countries in the world with the lowest obesity rates all consume a carb-dominant diet.

So where does that leave you? Are you supposed to assume that a high-carb diet only makes Americans fat? No, but we can use that to better understand and guide our eating habits.

Let’s face it: We can’t discount that low-carb diets have been found to be a very healthy way of eating. There’s plenty of research that indicates lower-carb diets do everything from helping with weight loss to building bodies designed to fight off disease. In fact, unless trying to build muscle, I typically follow a lower-carb approach. (Notice I said “lower-carb” instead of “no-carb,” because lower can mean 100 to 200 grams per day.) The more important message—and the one that will influence how you eat—is developing an understanding that while carbs are not all bad, they’re not all good either.

A Practical Approach to Eating Carbs

“Saying carbs are OK does not mean you should shovel in bucket-loads of refined flour foods and chase them down with gallons of soda,” Aragon says. Instead, be smart about where the majority of your carbs come from. It’s always best to create a diet that’s filled with whole and minimally refined foods. Eat more healthy foods (proteins, vegetables, fruits) and less of the stuff you know tastes good but has limited nutritional value (candy, soda, sugar-loaded foods, and boatloads of pasta).

Finding the right diet for you can take some work, but it’s important to remember that it can include carbs. A healthy diet can even include some of the carbs you might not consider healthy—whether bread, grains, and rice, or some sugary dessert every now and then.

The main point is to make the majority of your diet, say 80 to 90 percent, come from the good stuff, and keep the minority to the bad. (Or avoid it altogether, if that’s your preference or you know that a small taste might open the gateways to a binging episode.)

Some people will thrive on more carbs, while others will suffer. Your best bet is to play around with food options that are both healthy and work for you. This is the “sustainability diet,” and while it’s not really a diet (or all that exciting), it is the best approach to dietary success.

Take it from one of the best nutritionists in the world: “Your carb intake should be individualized according to your personal preference, tolerance, and athletic and aesthetic goals,” Aragon says. Experiment and be patient. Find the right balance for your body and let that become the truth when it comes to your dietary stance on carbs and the message we need to spread.

Article sourced here: http://greatist.com/eat/low-carb-diets-do-they-work
This post originally appeared on Born Fitness

Healthy Inspirations Recipe of the Week – Lasagne Meatloaf

October 20, 2016

hi2

hi

Stop and Smell the Roses by Glen Barnett

October 18, 2016

Ageing Sucks, So Stop And Smell The Roses roses.jpg

 Someone said to me the other day that ageing is unimportant unless you are a cheese. This person was 70 had a lovely weathered face and a life behind them that was filled with achievements, experiences, adventures and many different pathways.  Just like most people their age.  So why do I think ageing sucks – because I don’t want this life to ever end.

Yes, I know I could drop dead tomorrow but as you age there is that awareness that you are heading closer to the exit sign than you were a few years ago.

How fantastic is life. That is not a question it is a statement. There are so many wonderful things to explore, enjoy and experience.  Now that exploration and those experiences may not always be enjoyable but they do allow us to gather the knowledge and insight to so much more than we started out with.

Next time you go out and about take a moment or more to look, feel and listen.  Look at life around you. Close your eyes and feel life around you. Open your ears and hear life around you. Even draw your breath in and smell life around you.  Get saturated in life. Sometimes this experience will be overwhelming to all your senses. Other times you may feel one sense is more enlightened than another.  This is a simple process that we don’t often pursue because we are too busy, to rushed or to blinked in our pursuits.

We all have favourite things to do that bring contentment to us or put a smile on our faces.   Watching children play, listening to favourite music, singing loudly in the shower or car, smelling the flowers at the florist, browsing through your favourite magazine at the newsagent even doing something crazy like when your money comes out of the ATM shout “I Won, I Won”.

Everyday indulge in one of these but don’t see this indulgent time as a treat, because it is your right. Your right to stop and smell the roses and fully enjoy, experience and explore every minute of your fantastic life.

For any other crazy ideas on how to live life to the fullest, call Glen Barnett at Coffs Coast Health Club on 66586222.

 

 

 

 

 

Seven Signs You Need More Sleep

October 16, 2016

Turns out we could all use a little more shut-eye: Four in 10 people don’t get the recommended seven hours of sleep per night. As a result, we’re pretty familiar with the signs that our bodies need more rest: endless yawns, heavy eyes, and sleeping in on the weekends.

But when you go from a few restless nights to more chronic sleep deprivation—where sleep debt accumulates over weeks—you tend to not realize how tired you are, says Joseph Ojile, M.D., medical director at the Clayton Sleep Institute. “With fatigue and sleeplessness, we are by nature impaired,” he says. “So that also means our self-awareness and judgment is off.” Luckily there are some subtle (and slightly bizarre) signs that reveal when we’re truly sleep deprived.

1. You rely on clichés.

Do you find yourself peppering platitudes (“What goes around comes around” or “It is what it is”) into everyday conversation? No, you haven’t switched bodies with an old fogy, you might just be sleepy. Studies have shown that the act of pulling an all-nighter can mimic the levels of impairment we feel when we’re drunk, Ojile says.   “When you’re impaired, you rely on crutches, the things you know,” he says. “That could mean clichés or anything that is rote and will allow you to stay in conversation without expending much energy.”

And it’s not just clichés. Sleep-deprived people start to sound drunk, with slurred speech, trouble finding words, and excessive giddiness, says Terry Cralle, the national spokesperson for the Better Sleep Council and author of the children’s book Snoozby and the Great Big Bedtime Story.

2. You’re unusually moody.

You’re usually a pretty patient person, but now you have the shortest fuse. Little things, like people being late or missing deadlines, rile you up, and that’s totally normal for someone who’s sleep deprived, says Robert Rosenberg, M.D., a sleep medicine specialist and author of Sleep Soundly Every Night, Feel Fantastic Every Day. One study even showed that people who were low on sleep struggled to accurately read facial expressions; they started seeing non-threatening people as threatening.   As you can imagine, this would send most people into an emotional tailspin, thinking the world is out to get them.

3. You get sick all the time.

You just got over one illness, and the next thing you know, another cold has you down for the count. Your body isn’t railing against you (even if you ate a few too many helpings of chili cheese fries last weekend), but your immune system is weaker and struggling to fend off the germs you come into contact with every day. Case in point: One recent study found that people who slept less than five hours per night were four times more likely to catch the common cold than those who slept for six.

4. You have a serious case of the munchies. munchies1

Find yourself digging into a pint of ice cream right after you polished off some late-night pizza? Your hunger just can’t be sated—and there’s a perfectly good explanation for that. Studies have found that short sleeps lead to a lowered level of leptin (the hormone that decreases your appetite) and an increased level of ghrelin (the hunger hormone).   Talk about a bad combination! Even worse, another study found that participants who slept four-and-a-half hours for four consecutive nights showed increased insulin sensitivity and an elevated risk for diabetes—even though they didn’t change their diet.

5. You can’t seem to make a decision.

Some choices are always hard to make (Netflix or Hulu?), and then there are days when every decision seems like it’s do or die. If you’re low on sleep, you’ll have less blood flow to the pre-frontal cortex, the area of your brain responsible for critical thinking. At the same time, there’s hyperactivity in the amygdala, which is wired for our responses to fear. “This leads to all sorts of problems with executive function,” Rosenberg says. “That includes things like decision making, planning, organizing, and paying attention.”

6. You lose your libido.

“Who wants to be intimate when they’re sleep deprived?” Ojile says. And he’s got a point. For those of us who are low on sleep, the only thing we want to do when we crawl into bed is, well, sleep! Our sex drives seem non-existent. For men, studies have found that sleep deprivation can lower levels of testosterone, which also lowers their interest in being intimate with their partner.

7. You’re breaking out like crazy.

If you wake up in the morning with acne clustered around your chin, don’t think your high school years have come back to haunt you. It’s a perfectly normal reaction to being sleep deprived or overly stressed, says Jennifer Reichel, M.D., a board certified dematologist and advisor to RealSelf. Poor sleep habits can start to make skin less firm and hydrated—in a word: older.   We have cortisol to thank for that. The hormone spikes in people who are stressed and sleep deprived, and it can break down skin collagen, which stops it from being its usual smooth self.

The Takeaway

Sleep is hugely important to your body. Sure, we all love that well-rested and alert feeling, but there’s plenty of stuff happening behind the scenes too, from repairing damaged skin cells to flushing out toxins that build up in your brain. If you notice one of the aforementioned signs, it’s time to start thinking about your quantity and quality of sleep. Luckily, most of the time, these issues are reversible with a concerted effort to catch more zzzs.

Article sourced here:http://greatist.com/grow/subtle-signs-you-need-more-sleep

Healthy Inspirations Recipe of the Week – Steak Roll-ups

October 13, 2016

hi

hi

Sleep Like a Baby by Glen Barnett

October 11, 2016

sleep
Sleep like a Baby? Not Likely!

Sleeping like a baby may be something Baby Boomers would dream about, if only they could stay asleep, or at least get to sleep in the first place.

Having trouble sleeping is not uncommon especially as you get older.   The average person needs 7-9 hours of good quality sleep regardless of their age.  This may vary person to person but the quality of your sleep is what’s important.

There are many factors as we age that can affect the quality of our sleep from side effects of medications, sleep apnoea, prostate or incontinence troubles, stimulants from food or beverages we consume or even restless leg syndrome.

Lack of good quality sleep can exacerbate some of these issues resulting in a vicious cycle. Lack of good quality sleep may cause irritability, depression, weight issues and possibly make you more prone to illnesses and accidents.  One of the most common causes of poor sleep quality is stress.  Some people reading this article will wake at night tossing, turning and stressing about how to have quality sleep. As I said it’s a vicious cycle.

So what to do?  I’m always a believer in looking at lifestyle changes to help you so try going to the bed and waking at the same time every day.  TV and computers may be too stimulating for your brain so choose another activity to wind down with at night.  If your nocturnal mental ramblings are the culprit get up and write them down, then tell yourself you will ‘deal’ with them tomorrow.   Don’t look at the clock when you wake – it sets your mind alarm into the pattern of always waking at that time.  Decrease the amount of liquid you consume a couple of hours prior to going to bed to reduce the need to pay a penny during the night. Investing in a body pillow to wrap yourself around may help with your physical aches and pains.  Talk to your naturopath or GP about your need for magnesium and calcium which may alleviate those restless legs and ask if your other medications may be adding to your sleep woes.  Put a peg over your husbands (or your) nose to prevent the snoring – just kidding. Talk to your GP about this problem as it may be more serious than you think.  If you’re a Nana napper,  rethink or reduce your nap duration.     Avoid caffeine and sugar at bedtime and get your stimulus from daily exercise and a good old fashion dose of direct sunshine to help with your wake/sleep cycle.

If all else fails have some peace of mind in knowing that people who say they ‘sleep like a baby’ probably don’t have one or remember what it was like, to have had one.

Teaching Your Child Emotional Agility

October 9, 2016

tantrum
It’s hard to see a child unhappy. Whether a child is crying over the death of a pet or the popping of a balloon, our instinct is to make it better, fast.

That’s where too many parents get it wrong, says the psychologist Susan David, author of the book “Emotional Agility.” Helping a child feel happy again may offer immediate relief for parent and child, but it doesn’t help a child in the long term.

“How children navigate their emotional world is critical to lifelong success,” she said.

Research shows that when teachers help preschoolers learn to manage their feelings in the classroom, those children become better problem solvers when faced with an emotional situation, and are better able to engage in learning tasks. In teenagers, “emotional intelligence,” or the ability to recognize and manage emotions, is associated with an increased ability to cope with stressful situations and greater self-esteem. Some research suggests that a lack of emotional intelligence can be used to predict symptoms of depression and anxiety.

Emotional skills, said Dr. David, are the bedrock of qualities like grit and resilience. But instead of allowing a child to fully experience a negative emotion, parents often respond with what Dr. David describes as emotional helicoptering.

“We step into the child’s emotional space,” she said, with our platitudes, advice and ideas. Many common parental strategies, like minimizing either the emotion or the underlying problem or rushing to the rescue, fail to help a child learn how to help herself.

Dr. David offers four practical steps for helping a child go through, rather than around, a negative emotion and emerge ready to keep going — feel it, show it, label it, watch it go.

Feel It. While it may seem obvious to feel emotions, many families focus on pushing away negative emotions. “When we’re saying ‘don’t be sad, don’t be angry, don’t be jealous, don’t be selfish,’ we’re not coming to the child in the reality of her emotion,” she said. “Validate and see your child as a sentient person who has her own emotional world.”

Show It. Similarly, many families have what Dr. David calls “display rules” around emotions — there are those it is acceptable to show, and those that must be hidden. “We see expressions like ‘boys don’t cry’ and ‘we don’t do anger here,’ or ‘brush it off,’” she said. “We do it with very good intentions, but we are teaching that emotions are to be feared.”

Label It. Labeling emotions, Dr. David said, is a critical skill set for children.

“We need to learn to recognize stress versus anger or disappointment,” she said. Even very young children can consider whether they’re mad or sad, or angry or anxious or scared. “Labeling emotions is also at the core of our ability to empathize. Ask ‘How do you think so-and-so is feeling? What does their face tell you?’”

As children get older, she adds, we can talk more about emotional complexities. “We can be simultaneously excited and anxious and frustrated, and we also need to learn to recognize that in other people,” she said.

Watch It Go. Even the hardest emotions don’t last forever. Dr. David suggests helping your child to notice that. “Sadness, anger, frustration — these things have value, but they also pass. They’re transient, and we are bigger than they are. Say, ‘This is what sadness feels like. This is what it feels like after it passes. This is what I did that helped it pass.’”

We can also help children to remember that we don’t necessarily feel the same emotion every time we have a similar experience. The high dive is scariest the first time. We might feel a lot of anxiety at one party, or in one science class, but have a different experience the next time.

“We’re very good, as humans, at creating these stories around emotions,” Dr. David said. “‘I’m not good at making friends. I can’t do math.’ Those are feelings and fears, not fixed states. People and things change.”

Finally, she said, help your child plan for experiencing the emotion again. “Ask, ‘Who do you want to be in this situation?’” she said. “What’s important to you about this?” Children feel stronger as they begin to learn that it’s not how they feel, but how they respond to the feeling, that counts.

Article source: http://www.nytimes.com/2016/10/04/well/family/teaching-your-child-emotional-agility.html
Picture source: http://www.spring.org.uk/images/tantrum.jpg