Posts Tagged ‘Healthy Inpirations Coffs Harbour’

Coffs Coast Health Club eNews – October 2017

October 3, 2017

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1. Ever thought about becoming a Personal Trainer?

The Last Personal Trainer Course Intake for 2017 begins in October so this is your LAST CHANCE to make a change and live your dream. You can find out more about the Australian Institute of Personal Training by contacting Coffs Campus Manager Dan Tempest on 0432 579 221 or coffscoast@aipt.com.au

2. Did you know when you walk you are putting the force of as much as 5 times your body weight on each foot?
Our friends at Mid North Coast Physiotherapy will make sure your feet are functioning at their best with their GaitScan assessments. Find out more about GaitScan or book in for one of 20 FREE GaitScan assessments they are offering this month.

3. Save the Date!
Don’t forget to pop Saturday 9th of December into your diary for our annual Members and Family Christmas Party. More details to come as the date gets closer… Keep up to date with all Club & Community events by visiting our Events calendar.

4. Have you tried Kombucha?
We are excited to announce that we will be stocking the wonderful Gut Instinct Kombucha in both clubs! Learn about the benefits of Kombucha, and look out for Taste Tests happening throughout the month at your favourite club.

5. Win a Prize & a Workout Buddy:
We have a very special members only competition running for the month, with the chance to win a prize a week simply for referring your friends and family to try the club! Check out the calendar below to see the wonderful prizes! Simply see reception at your club to refer your friends and get your name in the draw! Keep an eye on our Facebook each Monday to see if you’re the lucky winner! Not a member yet? Join online now and SAVE!


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Glen Barnett discusses Exercise as Medicine

August 2, 2016

exercise-is-medicine

Here is a concept that I really want you to consider, I want you to view exercise and being active as medicine, a dose of goodness to manage your health, weight and wellness.  It has been proven over and over that as a preventative measure to ill health and as a ‘cure’ for a lot of ailments, exercise is the best medicine around.

So if we know that this ‘medicine’ called exercise can have such a positive effect on our well being then why isn’t everyone taking their daily dose?   Who knows maybe fear, laziness or indecision?  Here’s some help.

Start with a goal and see your goal as being your dessert – something you’re really looking forward to but you need to earn it.   Get to your goal in small bite size pieces. If your goal is to drop 20kg then plot some smaller increments in your calendar rather than the big figure down the track.

Make sure you get your exercise dosage correct so get some guidance.  It is important to know how much exercise should be ‘absorbed’ to give you the maximum benefit for your goal.  Exercise should be prescribed in a specific dose you know that works for you including type, intensity, frequency and duration.  Definitely sample different types of exercise medicine, until you’ve found what ‘medicinal remedy’ fits best with you or is easiest to swallow.   Basically make sure the exercise you ‘take’ is something you enjoy and something that is going to help you get to your goal.

Make a commitment to your health, yourself and your future. Taking a daily dose of exercise medicine in some way nearly every day will lead to a positive lifestyle change and a very healthy habit

So if you decide you want to get a dose of one of the best medicines for your health, call me, “Dr” Glen, at Coffs Coast Health Club on 66586222 and we can organise a FREE prescription to get you started.

 

Why I Will Choose to be a Little Fat

July 17, 2016

a little fat
How we can all feel good about ourselves, whatever our size.

I saw an article a few weeks ago with this incredible before-and-after set of photos of an overweight, post-baby woman who then became totally “bikini-worthy.”

So I had to click the link, of course, to have a look. No question about it—the “after” photo of this woman was a stunning shot. She looked fit, toned, healthy and gorgeous. I read on, eager to discover what her secret was; what profound magical method it was that she had used to shed however-many-number of pounds.

There it was, a long and detailed tract of the super lean, restrictive diet she had put herself on for a year. No carbs, no dairy, no fruit, no nothing. The sample diet she had shared in the article seemed to consist of little more than hummus, celery and endless amounts of steamed fish. Healthy—yes. Exciting, delicious, fun lifestyle—no.

I decided in that moment that I would choose to continue being a little bit fat.

Yes, I could do with losing at least about 10 pounds so that the Bébé dress I bought earlier this year would fit that much more snugly. But if it’s at the expense of not eating fruit, freshly baked breads, Greek yogurt and honey for a year, well then, I choose emphatically to continue being 10 pounds more than I should be.

Science is a wonderful thing. It’s revealed so many revolutionary ways of understanding the way our bodies work and the effects of new foods, super foods, bad foods and good foods on our health. It’s sad though that “health” has so often come to be equated only and necessarily with thinness.

The glut of diet programs, weight-loss fads, fat-burning supplements and specialized bikini-body workouts are now as much a part of our daily consumer choices as the aisles of (“forbidden”) food in supermarkets. There seems to be no excuse not to be “healthy” (read: thin) given the huge number of aids, YouTube videos and literature on the subject.

Articles like the one I read aren’t necessarily always an encouraging, inspiring thing. They don’t just tell the story of an overweight person who chose discipline and a healthier lifestyle. There is often also a more sinister sub-narrative that raises its eyebrows at the reader and challenges her—“If this person can lose xx pounds, why can’t you?”—even if the reader may not actually be unhealthy or overweight.

The titles of these articles alone are almost always weight-centered, like “I lost 120 pounds, ask me how!” or “How one man lost 200 pounds in a year.” Rarely are these articles presented through the perspective of someone choosing a healthier lifestyle, discarding bad nutritional habits or incorporating fitness into their daily routine.

There it is: the continuous, unceasing reminder that we should all be striving toward thinness. From cabbage soup fasts, to low-everything diets, to 20-minute fat-blasting workouts, the desirable end result is usually almost and entirely about becoming become a thinner version of ourselves.

I am not ignoring the fact that for a percentage of people who are facing the health risks of being dangerously overweight, losing weight is a part of becoming healthier. I don’t discount that and understand how important it is in these cases to count calories and lost inches.

Problems arise when that very same method is being adopted by people who aren’t facing any health risks—who may, in fact, be completely healthy, fit people—but who still feel that they would be healthier if only they were five, 10 or 20 pounds lighter.

So I’d like to suggest flipping things around a bit; looking at things through another lens.

Let’s focus on being healthy—and just that.

Logically and biologically, it would follow that by following a healthy way of living, eating and exercising, everything else will find its proper balance. We would lose weight if we needed to lose weight, we’d gain muscle if we needed to gain muscle, we’d balance out all the other things that come from not being healthy—stress, cholesterol, diabetes, poor complexion, hair loss etc.

And what does it mean to live healthily? In the face of all the new diet and exercise schemes, I think that actually, we all already know what it means to live a healthy, balanced, feel-totally-awesome lifestyle, without having to follow any fad or buy any specialized products.

Intuitively, deep down inside, we do know the basics of living well. We know when we’ve had enough to eat, what kinds of foods are good for us, what makes us feel good and what makes us go into a slump, how much exercise we need to do, when to stop when we’re exhausted and when to rest.

We know this not just intellectually, but physically—our bodies are always telling us what we need to do; we just need to listen.

One’s body will tell us when it feels like a massive binge on Chinese take-out. It will also tell us when it’s had enough so we don’t insist on finishing every last fortune cookie. Our bodies will take us dancing, running, swimming, trampolining and playing; but they will also make us rest and sleep.

I read something beautiful a while ago, about how we shouldn’t change our bodies so we can love them.

Instead, we should create change in the way we treat ourselves because we love our bodies.

Ultimately this is about focusing on health: the physical health of our bodies and the emotional health of how we see and relate to our bodies. We love our bodies—this temporary shell on loan to us for this lifetime—so we treat them well, nourish them, feed them, move them, hug them, stretch then, let them dance, discipline them, give them a treat sometimes and most of all enjoy them.

Enjoying our bodies is to indulge in the beautiful, sensual things like good food, good sex and the rush of an energetic run in the mornings. But also, I think enjoyment is about ensuring our bodies are at their prime health so that they truly get the most out of these things and appreciate, at our body’s fullest capacity, the good food, good sex and energetic run.

This is true whatever size we’re at, whether we’re trying to lose weight or gain weight, whether we’re severely overweight or dangerously underweight.

This is true because it’s a matter of health and of helping our bodies be at their optimum functioning levels, not merely a matter of what we look like.

Yes, ideally, I would still like the scales to tell me that I am 10 pounds lighter and to see my dress size drop to a single digit. But then, I have to ask myself what it really is that I’d like to get out of being that much thinner. I don’t have any illnesses, I live a happy, active life, and I’ve been medically cleared for good, prime health.

So what is it? To be more attractive? To feel more energetic? To turn more heads? To tighten that gap between me and the Victoria’s Secret models?

I realize now that if I only just went back to focusing on being healthy, everything else would find its rightful place. When I’m feeling healthy, my skin glows, my hair is shiny and I’m a face full of radiance. When I’m feeling fit after a big run and deep session of yoga, I’m also confident, joyful and there’s an extra bounce in my step.

Automatically, without being a single ounce lighter, I realize now that being healthy alone is enough to be more attractive, feel more energetic, turn more heads and gain almost as many admirers as the Victoria’s Secret angels.

With a focus on health, instead of weight, I find too that I enjoy life a whole lot more. I eat without guilt and play with abandon. I move and shift and indulge the very real needs of my body instead of spending good hours of my day fussing over diet plans, exercise schedules and meal replacement shakes.

It isn’t only when I achieve a vision of thinness that I am deemed healthy and attractive.

I am attractive because I am living healthily.

And if that means I shall always be a little bit fat, with a few extra pounds to shed, then that’s exactly what I shall be.

Written Via 
on Sep 29, 2013 for http://www.elephantjournal.com/2013/09/why-i-will-always-choose-to-be-a-little-bit-fat-jamie-khoo/

Coffs Coast Health Club eNews – July 2016

July 4, 2016

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Members & Guests Christmas In July Party
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Come & join us for some FUN & FRIVOLITY, good food & fabulous company! We love catching up with all of our members & this year we are combining both Toormina & Moonee Club Communities to DOUBLE THE FUN! We have even arranged a courtesy bus for trips both north and south if you wish to indulge.

When: Saturday 16th July
Where: Greenhouse Tavern
Time: 12.30pm until 2.30pm
Food: A yummy lunch of hot and cold finger and cocktail food, pizza, healthy wraps and cheese and fruit platters, followed by a famously delicious Wicked Berries cake!
Drinks: from the bar
Tickets: Available from reception at the clubs or call Toormina on

6658 6222 or Moonee on 6653 6122. Only $15 per adult & $5 per child

A Warm Apple Pie (with Cream) Welcome to our New Dietitian Katie Drury

one stopAre you confused by nutrition? Do you find it difficult to choose the right foods for your health needs? Struggling to lose weight or managing allergies and intolerances? If so, it’s time you got the support you need from our accredited Dietitian.

Katie can help you with:
• Diabetes: if you are newly diagnosed, have irregular blood glucose levels or if you have recently had your medication changed.
• Heart problems: if you have high cholesterol, high triglycerides and/or high blood pressure.
• Allergies: if you suspect food allergies or intolerances i.e. suffering chronic abdominal discomfort, bloating, constipation, diarrhoea.
• Weight loss or unintentional weight loss & poor appetite.
• Sports nutrition if you’re seeking to increase your athletic performance.

Mid North Coast Physio are offering 5 FREE assessments with Katie to help you reach your health goals and discover a happier, healthier version of you. Call 1300 27 37 47 NOW to secure your FREE assessment before they run out!

Tips To Stay Warm In Class This Winter Workout Season

polar bearAs the weather gets cooler we can be tempted to sleep through our alarm in the morning and stay under the doona, or head straight home after a long cold day at work but it is important for your health and well-being that you continue exercising right through the Winter months. In order to boost your immune system, maintain your fitness and keep your mind happy and active, regular exercise is essential.

1. It is warmer inside the gym than it is outside and your favourite class is going to get you hot and sweaty but make sure that you wear layers to and from the club so that your muscles stay warm.  Remove the layers as you warm up during class and then add them back on as you cool off.
2. Hydration is very important and although you may not feel as thirsty when it is cold you need to ensure that you drink before, during and after class.
3. Allow a little extra time before class to warm up on a piece of cardio equipment or by doing some dynamic stretching.  Warming the muscles up adequately will prevent injury.
4. Put your favourite classes in your diary at the start of the week and commit to those work outs like you would any other appointment.
5. If you are finding that you are hitting the snooze button too often why not try leaving your alarm on the other side of the bedroom. Once you are up to switch it off you are up for the day.
6. If you are attending an early morning class lay your workout gear out ready for you to slip in to straight away or even sleep in your gear. If you are heading to the gym after work make sure you have everything in your car ready to go so there is no temptation to head home for any reason before heading to your class.

The great thing about group exercise is that you get to sweat it out with other people who are motivated, inspired and pushed by your instructor.  So don’t hibernate this winter – get in to the club and get warm while you get fitter, stronger and healthier.

The Power of NanoPro Versus Standard Protein Supplements

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We all know that protein is an essential nutrient for the human body, but how do you know which protein is best? We’ve got you covered. Our EXCLUSIVE NanoPro takes protein to a whole new level. It is not just for muscles, it’s a full body internal tissue repair system that helps heal the entire body from the inside, out.

The benefits of NanoPro include:
• The highest bioavailability of any Protein supplement on the market
• Increase lean muscle and bone mass
• Speed recovery time from exercise, injury, illness, or surgery
• Reduce injuries related to working out
• Help maintain a trim, fat-burning, lean body mass
• Stabilize blood sugar and blood lipid levels
• Healthy appetite regulation
• Supports low carb diets
• Cellular detoxification and protection
• Healthy heart, brain, bones, organs, tissue repair
• Support a balanced immune system

NanoPro protein is truly a quantum leap in functional food nutrition that provides optimal health benefits. Coffs Coast Health Club is the exclusive stockist of NanoPro & right now at both Toormina & Moonee, we are offering it for only $79 until SOLD OUT ~ SAVE OVER 10%!

Coffs Harbour Running Festival Training Program

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Are you getting ready for the Coffs Harbour 10km Fun Run? Glen Barnett is running a training program for Beginners to participate in the 10km fun run.

The 9 week program provides all the coaching and support you need to compete in the Coffs Harbour 10km on 4 September 2016! Starting on the 6th July this program will give you what you need to make the distance.

The mid-week session on the track will focus on:
– General fitness
– Breathing technique
– Core strength
– Injury prevention

On Saturdays we do a ‘long run’, and the distances increase as the program progresses. At this distance session we will focus on:
– Pacing and race strategy
– Distance “in your legs”
– Mental focus
– Running form
– Building up endurance

On top of the group sessions there will be a specific day by day training guide which outlines what you should be doing every day to help you be your very best on race day. Cost is only $50 p/week via direct debit or $420 upfront. Contact Glen directly on 0411037097 or glen@coffscoasthc.com.au to book your spot.bsc

40% OFF Women’s BSC Body Active Viper Range

Bodyscience Body Active Viper Collection has been Designed and made in Australia. The limited edition Viper Collection is hand crafted from Bsc’s unique high performance compression fabric. Together with the one of a kind luxe snake skin print in dark shades create an ultra-flattering sexy look on all body types. Available at the Moonee Club reception or call them on 6653 6122.

Short Term Workout Options for Friends and Family

shorttermDo you have friends or family that are in town during the school holidays? Would you like to save them some money & get them working out with you? Well due to popular demand we are now offering some short term workout options for them…

Single Visit – adult only $15, student or baby boomer only $10, incl access during all supervised hours
Week Pass – adult only $29, student or baby boomer only $19, incl access during all supervised hours

Simply see reception at the clubs or call Toormina on 6658 6222 or Moonee on 6653 6122 to take advantage of these offers for a limited time.

Have Your Say & WIN FREE Personal Training

saytowinWin a FREE Personal Training or Weight Loss Consultation by telling us what you need!

We are passionate about helping you succeed with your health and fitness goals, so to make sure we are delivering what you need to achieve your goals, please click the link below to have your say. This survey is brought to you by our Coffs Coast Personal Trainers and our Healthy Inspirations Weight Loss Coaches. You can fill out the survey anonymously or add your details at the end to go into a draw to win a FREE Personal Training or Weight Loss Consultation. This survey is only open until 17th July with the draw taking place the very next day. What you waiting for? Go for it! https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/BK7V2BW

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Our mailing address is:
Coffs Coast Health Club
Link Indoor Leisure Centre, 600B Hogbin Dr, Toormina
Moonee Marketplace, 2B Moonee Beach Rd, Moonee Beach
Coffs Coast, NSW 2452 & 2450
Australia

Foods that Fight Inflammation

August 16, 2015

Doctors are learning that one of the best ways to quell inflammation lies not in the medicine cabinet, but in the refrigerator.

Your immune system attacks anything in your body that it recognizes as foreign—such as an invading microbe, plant pollen, or chemical. The process is called inflammation. Intermittent bouts of inflammation directed at truly threatening invaders protect your health.

However, sometimes inflammation persists, day in and day out, even when you are not threatened by a foreign invader. That’s when inflammation can become your enemy. Many major diseases that plague us—including cancer, heart disease, diabetes, arthritis, depression, and Alzheimer’s—have been linked to chronic inflammation.

One of the most powerful tools to combat inflammation comes not from the pharmacy, but from the grocery store. “Many experimental studies have shown that components of foods or beverages may have anti-inflammatory effects,” says Dr. Frank Hu, professor of nutrition and epidemiology in the Department of Nutrition at the Harvard School of Public Health.

Choose the right foods, and you may be able to reduce your risk of illness. Consistently pick the wrong ones, and you could accelerate the inflammatory disease process.

Foods that inflame

Try to avoid or limit these foods as much as possible:

  • refined carbohydrates, such as white bread and pastries
  • French fries and other fried foods
  • soda and other sugar-sweetened beverages
  • red meat (burgers, steaks) and processed meat (hot dogs, sausage)
  • margarine, shortening, and lard

Inflammation-promoting foods

Not surprisingly, the same foods that contribute to inflammation are generally considered bad for our health, including sodas and refined carbohydrates, as well as red meat and processed meats.

Some of the foods that have been associated with an increased risk for chronic diseases such as type 2 diabetes and heart disease are also associated with excess inflammation,” Dr. Hu says. “It’s not surprising, since inflammation is an important underlying mechanism for the development of these diseases.”

Unhealthy foods also contribute to weight gain, which is itself a risk factor for inflammation. Yet in several studies, even after researchers took obesity into account, the link between foods and inflammation remained, which suggests weight gain isn’t the sole driver. “Some of the food components or ingredients may have independent effects on inflammation over and above increased caloric intake,” Dr. Hu says.

Foods that combat inflammation

Include plenty of these anti-inflammatory foods in your diet:

  • tomatoes
  • olive oil
  • green leafy vegetables, such as spinach, kale, and collards
  • nuts like almonds and walnuts
  • fatty fish like salmon, mackerel, tuna, and sardines
  • fruits such as strawberries, blueberries, cherries, and oranges

Anti-inflammation foods

On the flip side are foods and beverages that have been found to reduce the risk of inflammation, and with it, chronic disease, says Dr. Hu. He notes in particular fruits and vegetables such as blueberries, apples, and leafy greens that are high in natural antioxidants and polyphenols—protective compounds found in plants.

Studies have also associated nuts with reduced markers of inflammation and a lower risk of cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Coffee, which contains polyphenols and other anti-inflammatory compounds, may protect against inflammation, as well.

Anti-inflammatory eating

To reduce levels of inflammation, aim for an overall healthy diet. If you’re looking for an eating plan that closely follows the tenets of anti-inflammatory eating, consider the Mediterranean diet, which is high in fruits, vegetables, nuts, whole grains, fish, and healthy oils.

In addition to lowering inflammation, a more natural, less processed diet can have noticeable effects on your physical and emotional health. “A healthy diet is beneficial not only for reducing the risk of chronic diseases, but also for improving mood and overall quality of life,” Dr. Hu says.

Foods that fight inflammation-infographArticle sourced here: http://www.health.harvard.edu/staying-healthy/foods-that-fight-inflammation

Asking a Person if they’ve Lost Weight isn’t a Compliment

July 5, 2015

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This article was source from The Daily Life, July 1st 2015.
http://www.dailylife.com.au/life-and-love/real-life/asking-if-ive-lost-weight-isnt-a-compliment-20150630-gi1cwo.html

Don’t ask me if I’ve lost weight. I haven’t. Or maybe I have. I don’t know, I’m not counting.

I’ve been ‘overweight’ since I was about 10, fluctuating between what people might describe as ‘chubby’ or ‘curvy’ and can’t-buy-clothes-in-regular-shops fat. A few years ago, I finally stopped worrying about the kilos and focused on just being happy and healthy. I don’t know what I weigh anymore, but I do know what I’m worth.

As a result of this shift in focus I am happier and, if you go by the attention I’ve received from the ladies, I’m also more attractive. I leave the house more confident and, in my opinion, better dressed, largely a result of following plus-size bloggers and having a friend who works at a plus-size store (we won’t mention her by name in case she gets in trouble for sharing her staff discount around!).

And yet, despite the fact that I’m fairly sure I’ve gained a bit of weight in this time, many friends and relatives greet me with “Have you lost weight?” when I am looking particularly good. They haven’t gotten out the tape measure or scales; indeed I question whether they’ve even scoped out my frame for a potential change in size. What they mean by “Have you lost weight?” is “You look nice today”.

So why not just say that? What value does asking if I’ve lost weight add to the compliment? All it does is remind me you’ve noticed I’m overweight and think a change to how I look would be an improvement. As an aside, I loathe the term overweight. It makes me think of luggage. I prefer to describe myself as fat.

People are so conditioned to equate ‘fat’ with ‘bad’, they can’t tell a woman she looks good without providing size-based commentary. Alas, commenting on size brings with it many risks and pitfalls. Firstly, it reinforces size-based judgment, even when it’s supposedly supportive. Instead of judging a person on their humour, warmth, great fashion choices or intellect, you’re commenting on whether they eat less and exercise more. For me, every time someone asks if I’ve lost weight, I am reminded that I haven’t, I’m reminded I am different and I am reminded that I live in a society that thinks I am a problem.

Secondly, not everyone loses weight healthily and happily. By asking someone if they’ve lost weight, you could be opening up a conversation about depression, chronic illness, eating disorders or stress. A person may not want to be reminded that they’ve lost ten kilos due to Irritable Bowel Syndrome. Thinner is not always better.

Thirdly, by telling a person that their weight loss makes them look better, you set them up for a fall if they gain some weight back. I recently got into a Facebook debate with a woman who commented on my friend Viv’s selfie: “While you’ve always been stunning, I want to congratulate you on your shrinkage – you’ve gone from a 10 to a 10+.”

Leaving aside rating a woman’s attractiveness out of 10 (which we shouldn’t leave aside because gross, but I only have so many words), by specifically indicating that my friend looks better skinnier, the commenter is saying that if she gains any weight back she’ll be back to a boring old 10! The argument carried on, as social media arguments tend to do, ’til the commenter stated “Maybe it’s a little arrogant for me to assume this, but I find it hard to imagine somebody would go through the hard yards of losing weight and not see that as an achievement.”

Viv finally weighed in (‘scuse the pun), writing: “I have a chronic illness. Losing weight because I’m sick, and will be sick for the rest of my life, isn’t an achievement. So yeah, your assumptions regarding my body and health are way off. And even if I had lost weight on purpose, I agree with everything Maeve said. Also, I miss my boobs.”

The triumph of winning a Facebook debate was tempered by empathy for my friend, who I knew was unwell and who I continue to have engaging and challenging discussions about bodies, size, feminism and the way society equates ‘healthy’ with ‘skinny’.

When I was 21, I lost 17kg in a few months by starving myself and taking up smoking. Should I have been congratulated then? Or should I be congratulated now for being a fatty who dances, plays soccer, does a little lounge room yoga with her girlfriend and eats her greens? How about you just don’t comment on my health or size AT ALL?

Some people do work hard to lose weight and, if they tell you about it, feel free to share their joy. But don’t let their experiences colour your assumptions about others. When you place value on size, you reinforce damaging ‘rules’ about what makes a person attractive. Making desirability about size reinforces the idea that to take up less space is better, that ‘shrinkage’ is an achievement.

This idea is so ingrained that it takes intellectual and emotional work to break down societal pressures to see thin as better, more beautiful, more successful. One way we can achieve this is to actively not comment on other people’s size. “You look stunning tonight” will suffice.

Maeve Marsden is a freelance writer, director, producer and performer. She performs in feminist cabaret act Lady Sings it Better, consults on education outreach campaigns, and collaborates on various creative projects. She tweets from @maevegobash.

Healthy Inspirations Recipe of the Week – Roasted Tomatoes with Porterhouse Steak

March 5, 2015

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Healthy Inspirations Recipe of the Week – Baked Trout

February 19, 2015

baked trout

Healthy Inspirations Recipe of the Week – Horseradish Scramble with Bacon & Mushroom

January 15, 2015

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Healthy Inspirations Recipe of the Week – Fish Fingers

January 8, 2015

fish fingers