Posts Tagged ‘Fitness & Health’

Healthy Inspirations Recipe of the Week – Broccoli Soup with Pine Nuts

August 18, 2016

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Diastasis Recti/abdominal separation – stretching of connective tissue.

August 7, 2016

I was at a party recently telling a woman- what I do for a living. When I got to the part about helping women recover from diastasis recti – she shook her head indicating I had lost her on those words. “You know- mummy tummy, mamma pooch. When your abs separate post partum and you always look pregnant even though you are not.” Now the lady looked scared. “Separate post partum?” She had never heard of that and it sounded awful. What happens to your guts? She wanted to know.

This conversation is not a new thing. Many if not most women have never heard that your abs can separate during pregnancy. However what was shocking about my encounter with this woman is that she discovered right then and there, at this party that she herself has a diastasis recti. Yes I had her lay down and gave her the quick 20 second test on her abs and sure enough they were separated at the midline. Needless to say she was shocked and a bit angry. Shocked that no doctor had ever given her an explanation for her “mummy tummy” and angry that there was a solution out there that didn’t involve surgery and no-one had ever told her. All these years she thought it was just what happened when you had a baby. Your belly stayed “saggy,” as she described it.

Before I get to the “fix,” I just want to clear up some definitions because “mummy tummy,” “jelly belly,” and “mamma pooch” are not my favorite terms nor are they scientific. (And no, this does not have to come with the territory of pregnancy. And yes, men get it too.) Diastasis Recti (referred to as DR) is where there 2 halves of your abdominal muscles have separated creating a gap in your midsection, making it seemingly impossible to regain core strength much less feel good in a bathing suit. It sucks. It can feel awful, frustrating and like your body has totally let you down. Many women feel body shame and it is no wonder so many resort to surgery with the extreme pressure to toned, fit and thin that prevails.

 

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Plastic surgery statistics tell us that over 100,000 people are getting abdominoplasties every single year. Proving that one of women (and men’s) most coveted physical real estate is the tummy. Invoking mama earth, desire, fertility, sexuality and a svelte silhouette all at once is a heavy load to carry in our midsection. It’s also often the area we are hardest on ourselves as mother’s. Many women post partum work feverishly to do 1000 crunches, bootcamp and cardio blasts to get a flat tummy again. For women with diastasis recti, these things can actually make it worse and not better!

Diastasis Recti is usually fixable but it requires a different approach than you might be used to.

I have worked with hundreds of women with a diastasis recti and I can tell you that it is not a death sentence. Our exercise culture and fitness world loves to blame things. You are overweight because you eat too much, you can’t get thin because of your metabolism, and your mummy tummy is from pregnancy and childbirth. These myths and lies have us aiming for perfection rather than fostering healing.

The first part to closing the gap (the term used to describe fixing a DR) is giving up on the goal of a perfect body as seen in mass media and recognizing that what your body needs most right now is a re-educating of sorts. Most wear and tear injuries like DR have a root cause. Rather than focussing on ways to get a flat belly as fast as possible, I highly recommend you to look why you have a DR. DR is caused by too much pressure in our abdominals.

The real question is: Where is the extra pressure in the abs coming from?

The common culprits to extra abdominal pressure are: body alignment- the way you stand or sit all day can put a lot of extra pressure on your abs; use/overuse/misuse of muscles can also create extra pressure; and one of the main culprits that always surprises people is your breathing patterns. A belly breathing pattern once again puts a lot of excess pressure on your abs. Once you peg the root causes and go about resolving the muscle imbalances, your breathing patterns and alignment of your body- your diastasis recti should get better and with the right exercise program- you can close the gap and build a functional core.

The second part of the closing the gap healing process is to realize that diastasis recti is not a death sentence because it can be an opportunity to practice self love, acceptance and compassion. We have been brainwashed into how our bodies “should” look- hard, toned and slim. (We are often not told that hard, toned and slim does not equal healthy and balanced.) Embracing health is not unlike any other emotional issue – it means accepting where we are at first, the choices we made to get here and then looking at creating a healthy relationship with ourselves again. The path to embracing your body rather than shaming it and having unrealistic expectations can lead to a more rewarding overall experience.

Just as there’s no cheat-sheet for parenting, the same goes for loving and accepting our post baby bodies no matter how many years it’s been. If you have tried the get-thin-quick, have-a-flat belly-fast programs only to find that they do not work for you try getting to the root cause of the imbalance and then search for some online communities that support a restorative approach. Having a supportive community of like-minded women who are on the path to healing helps as we find our way back to the trust we once had in our physical bodies. Knowing that the only death sentence we face, is the one where we don’t change our perspective on how bodies “should” look.

Join Lauren’s private FB group for practical tips, videos and articles for all things post baby body related: Restore Your Core.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/is-mummy-tummy-a-death-sentence_us_57a0dbb8e4b00e7e26a0541c

Glen Barnett discusses Exercise as Medicine

August 2, 2016

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Here is a concept that I really want you to consider, I want you to view exercise and being active as medicine, a dose of goodness to manage your health, weight and wellness.  It has been proven over and over that as a preventative measure to ill health and as a ‘cure’ for a lot of ailments, exercise is the best medicine around.

So if we know that this ‘medicine’ called exercise can have such a positive effect on our well being then why isn’t everyone taking their daily dose?   Who knows maybe fear, laziness or indecision?  Here’s some help.

Start with a goal and see your goal as being your dessert – something you’re really looking forward to but you need to earn it.   Get to your goal in small bite size pieces. If your goal is to drop 20kg then plot some smaller increments in your calendar rather than the big figure down the track.

Make sure you get your exercise dosage correct so get some guidance.  It is important to know how much exercise should be ‘absorbed’ to give you the maximum benefit for your goal.  Exercise should be prescribed in a specific dose you know that works for you including type, intensity, frequency and duration.  Definitely sample different types of exercise medicine, until you’ve found what ‘medicinal remedy’ fits best with you or is easiest to swallow.   Basically make sure the exercise you ‘take’ is something you enjoy and something that is going to help you get to your goal.

Make a commitment to your health, yourself and your future. Taking a daily dose of exercise medicine in some way nearly every day will lead to a positive lifestyle change and a very healthy habit

So if you decide you want to get a dose of one of the best medicines for your health, call me, “Dr” Glen, at Coffs Coast Health Club on 66586222 and we can organise a FREE prescription to get you started.

 

The Real Cost of Ownership

July 31, 2016

Life is hectic and stressful—we work long hours and the little time we have to ourselves is jam-packed with errands and responsibilities. It feels like we never have enough time.shop

All the while, media and society are in our face telling us, “That’s not enough. You need to own more, do more.”

In 2008 I decided I’d had enough. This concept didn’t seem right or worth it; and a wailing inside told me to stop and reevaluate my lifestyle. It was then that I embarked on a seven-month backpacking odyssey into the backroads of Asia, exploring different Buddhist traditions and advancing my meditation practice. I was determined to find the key to greater peacefulness in my life.

It was a life-changing journey, and this adventure—the people, the land, the culture and the Buddhist Masters I met—became the basis for my book Caves, Huts, and Monasteries: Finding the Deeper Self Along the Footpaths of Asia.

As I lived with people who have extraordinarily simple lifestyles, an insight into my inner angst began to form. High in the Himalayas I met mountain villagers who owned almost nothing and were raised from birth to put the needs of others before their own. I saw happiness and contentment there.

I stayed with an Indian desert family in their straw-roofed hut where they walked in bare feet and traveled by camel and cart. I saw happiness and contentment there.

I stayed in numerous Buddhist monasteries with monks who slept on the floor, owned only their robes, and spent their waking hours either in meditation or helping others. I saw happiness and contentment there.

I met and talked with common folk, people with few belongings, and so often our discussions would end with this advice: “Money means nothing, sir. Materials mean nothing, sir.” I saw happiness and contentment in them.

Over and over, I compared their simple lives to mine and wondered: Why are these people with almost nothing so happy and content?

I saw no link between having and happiness. But why not? My life is much easier than theirs. I have hot, running water at the press of a button, a house that is heated and air-conditioned, soft and comfortable furniture and a car at my fingertips to go anywhere at any time. I have a lot.

This conundrum dwelled in my mind for many weeks. And then I saw the link: there is more cost to ownership than shown on the price tag.

For each item we own, there is a “Real Ownership Cost,” which includes the time, effort and anxiety we experience throughout the life cycle of ownership. Aha! Deciding what to purchase based only on the price tag is where we’ve gone wrong.

Here’s where things become unorthodox. We’re talking about effects on our life here, not pocketbook cost. So let’s throw the concept of money out the door for a moment. I want to measure Real Ownership Cost in terms of time and anxiety—after all, isn’t that what we complain about? There’s always too little time and too much anxiety. Isn’t having time to enjoy oneself in a peaceful manner a good measure of quality of life?

Since we can’t pull out a calculator to evaluate this cost, we will make this a subjective evaluation. Doing this raises awareness of what we do in our lives—this is applied mindfulness.

If we calculate the Real Ownership Cost for all the things we own, we will find that ownership is a significant cause of the busyness and stress we so often complain about. We need to somehow consider this cost upfront before embarking on a purchase.

Let me give you an example of Real Ownership Cost—I’ll use a television purchase to demonstrate.

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  • We want to own the latest, greatest television. We think about where it will go, if we can afford it, and how we will pay for it. There’s time, and a certain amount of stre
    ss, involved with all this. Your mind is grabbing; it is occupied and somewhat heavy. You’re already being pulled from the present moment.
  • We decide to get the television, so it’s time to shop. We spend time on the Internet, going to stores, dealing with salespeople and even experience anxiety about the possibility of getting ripped off. We want to get the best deal, right? For me this is a stressful and time consuming process.
  • We find the right television and purchase it. How much time did we have to work to earn the money for the purchase and taxes? If we’re prone to calculate, we divide the total cost by our hourly rate. Wow, did we really work two weeks just for a TV?!
  • Now it’s time to bring our purchase home. We travel to pick it up, pack it into the car, bring it home and carry it inside, all the while worrying about dropping or scratching it. More time and stress—just add it in.
  • It’s set up time. We take time to figure out where to put it, read the instructions and once again feel worry and frustration about whether we’re doing it right. Maybe we need to buy more cables—another trip to the store. Maybe we need to call tech support—there goes a few more hours of our lives!
  • Great, the TV is working. But it’s so nice and now we’re worried it’ll get stolen. Maybe we should buy insurance. Oh, and be careful not to scratch it when we walk by. We want to protect our belongings, that’s a background stress that’s always there. The mind is not light.
  • Six months later the color is distorted. We need a repair man. How much time did we have to work to earn the money for that repair? How much time to arrange for the repair? Did we lose time from work? More to add.
  • Two years later a new “Smart TV” hits the market and we decide we have to have it. But the lifecycle of the old one isn’t over yet because now we need to get rid of it. It takes time and energy to sell it, trade it in, move it or throw it in the trash. More time and worry to add to the list.
  • Then there’s what I call the “anchor effect.” Life has a way of changing course unexpectedly and now we have to move. Here we go again—packing up our purchase, moving it to storage or into our new place, worrying (again) about damage and insurance. With a house full of stuff, we are neither mobile nor flexible in our lifestyle. We are stuck like a boat anchor.
  • Finally, there is the somewhat intangible, but very real environmental issue of ownership. Buddhists know that everything is connected and what affects any living being affects ourselves as well. Every item produced takes from the earth, consumes energy, contributes to climate change and ends up as some form of pollution. Our consumption comes back at us in often subtle but negative ways.

The above example is different for every person and every item we consider. And it doesn’t just apply to large items. When we look at the full lifecycle effects of ownership, there is much more than meets the eye, and extending the consideration to all the items we own accounts for a significant part of our daily struggle with time and anxiety.

Don’t get me wrong, this isn’t the sole key to a “lighter mind”—only a component. We still have a lot of inner work to do to recognize the cravings and attachment to non-material items that produce anger, jealousy and unhappiness. And I’m not suggesting we renounce everything, shave our heads and wear a robe. The point is awareness: if we are aware of all the negatives that come along with that desirable item, we might well choose otherwise. Meditation is one tool to help gain that level of awareness.

It took an extended time living in third world situations before I recognized the link between ownership, time and stress. Sure, we’ve heard the great sages tell us not to get caught up in earthly things, but that all seems high and holy, doesn’t it? Everyone around us own plenty, so striving for more seems normal.

But don’t take my word for it. Take a look at the things around you and mentally consider all the time, effort and anxiety that went into them. Notice the small increments of time spent and worry created in engaging with belongings as you go through your daily activities. Multiply the effect times all the things you own.

Several friends of mine have done this to varying degrees and each reported a lightening of their life, a release of burden. One went through all his belongings and sold everything he could reasonably do without—right down to the unopened bottle of shampoo he didn’t intend to use. Not only did he “lighten his load,” but he had fun doing it.

Having less is like removing a ball and chain from one’s foot. First, we find more financial flexibility. Think about how much less stressful work would be if we didn’t have to worry about how to pay for all our purchases. Next, we find more available time. Here’s an opportunity to add to our meditation practice or volunteer in your community. Exercising compassion is easier without the burden of added stress.

So what’s stopping us from releasing a belonging? I often hear people say, “I might need it sometime.” But we can always buy another if we truly need to. I suggest trying to get by without it. Be creative with what you have and you might be surprised.

From a Buddhist perspective, this is addressing the root causes of our suffering: desire and attachment. Watch your mind as you consider relinquishing an item. Observe the clinging, grabbing and resistance of the mind. It is literally uncomfortable at times. Don’t fight it, just acknowledge it and then act appropriately. If the mind resists too much, let it be, drop the issue and resolve to revisit it at a later date. You may find at a later date that the mind has naturally comes to terms and is ready to let it go.

We need to focus on us: raising our awareness and lightening our load. With this mastered, we can move on to the larger societal problem of consumption.

Real Ownership Cost is a perspective, not an equation. It allows us to see how the cumulative invested time and anxiety over the lifecycle of ownership contributes to the busyness and anxiety in our lives. Ownership is best evaluated from a holistic viewpoint that focuses on the total impact on our lives. When purchasing and consuming becomes a conscious choice not driven by sublime desire, we will lighten our lives and our minds.

Author: Mark S. Kacik
Sourced from: http://www.elephantjournal.com/2016/07/the-real-cost-of-ownership-how-to-lighten-our-life-mind/

Glen Barnett discusses Stomach Exercises

July 19, 2016

flat stomach
One of the most common questions Personal Trainers are asked is how to get a flat stomach.  One of the most common exercise mistakes people make in trying to get a flat stomach, is to do situps.  To flatten your stomach you need to really pay attention to what types of food you eat and how much, do some cardio exercise that gets you huffy and puffy and do a variety of core exercise.  Here are just a few examples:

Ride an imaginary bike while lying on your back. It can be a challenging exercise but will activate your deep core muscles.  Remember to start with lifting up your pelvic floor first, then drawing your lower stomach muscles in firmly. Bend your knees and lift your feet one at a time off the floor.  Now start ‘cycling’ your legs  at a moderate pace. Key point is to keep you back on the ground.

Then  to strengthen the muscles in your lower back start by lying on your stomach, lift your pelvic floor and draw your lower stomach muscles in. Then stretch your arms out in front of you, raise your head, then one arm and opposite leg, about 2cms off the floor. Lower and repeat on the opposite side. If you need to make it easier,  then just lift either the arm or just the leg.

 Side bends will help strengthen the muscles that run along the side of your torso and those muscles that help you with rotating.  Standing firmly on both feet, again lift your pelvic floor and draw your lower stomach muscles in firmly. Let your arms hang down each side then lean over to the side as if reaching sideways toward the floor. Add some extra resistance by holding onto something that weighs a few kgs.  Try not to lean forward and definitely keep both feet flat on the floor.

 

With the above exercises, keep breathing, a steady pace and continue for 30 seconds.  Rest then repeat.

 

If you’d like a free session at Coffs Coast Health Club give Glen or Jacqui a call on 66586222.

Why I Will Choose to be a Little Fat

July 17, 2016

a little fat
How we can all feel good about ourselves, whatever our size.

I saw an article a few weeks ago with this incredible before-and-after set of photos of an overweight, post-baby woman who then became totally “bikini-worthy.”

So I had to click the link, of course, to have a look. No question about it—the “after” photo of this woman was a stunning shot. She looked fit, toned, healthy and gorgeous. I read on, eager to discover what her secret was; what profound magical method it was that she had used to shed however-many-number of pounds.

There it was, a long and detailed tract of the super lean, restrictive diet she had put herself on for a year. No carbs, no dairy, no fruit, no nothing. The sample diet she had shared in the article seemed to consist of little more than hummus, celery and endless amounts of steamed fish. Healthy—yes. Exciting, delicious, fun lifestyle—no.

I decided in that moment that I would choose to continue being a little bit fat.

Yes, I could do with losing at least about 10 pounds so that the Bébé dress I bought earlier this year would fit that much more snugly. But if it’s at the expense of not eating fruit, freshly baked breads, Greek yogurt and honey for a year, well then, I choose emphatically to continue being 10 pounds more than I should be.

Science is a wonderful thing. It’s revealed so many revolutionary ways of understanding the way our bodies work and the effects of new foods, super foods, bad foods and good foods on our health. It’s sad though that “health” has so often come to be equated only and necessarily with thinness.

The glut of diet programs, weight-loss fads, fat-burning supplements and specialized bikini-body workouts are now as much a part of our daily consumer choices as the aisles of (“forbidden”) food in supermarkets. There seems to be no excuse not to be “healthy” (read: thin) given the huge number of aids, YouTube videos and literature on the subject.

Articles like the one I read aren’t necessarily always an encouraging, inspiring thing. They don’t just tell the story of an overweight person who chose discipline and a healthier lifestyle. There is often also a more sinister sub-narrative that raises its eyebrows at the reader and challenges her—“If this person can lose xx pounds, why can’t you?”—even if the reader may not actually be unhealthy or overweight.

The titles of these articles alone are almost always weight-centered, like “I lost 120 pounds, ask me how!” or “How one man lost 200 pounds in a year.” Rarely are these articles presented through the perspective of someone choosing a healthier lifestyle, discarding bad nutritional habits or incorporating fitness into their daily routine.

There it is: the continuous, unceasing reminder that we should all be striving toward thinness. From cabbage soup fasts, to low-everything diets, to 20-minute fat-blasting workouts, the desirable end result is usually almost and entirely about becoming become a thinner version of ourselves.

I am not ignoring the fact that for a percentage of people who are facing the health risks of being dangerously overweight, losing weight is a part of becoming healthier. I don’t discount that and understand how important it is in these cases to count calories and lost inches.

Problems arise when that very same method is being adopted by people who aren’t facing any health risks—who may, in fact, be completely healthy, fit people—but who still feel that they would be healthier if only they were five, 10 or 20 pounds lighter.

So I’d like to suggest flipping things around a bit; looking at things through another lens.

Let’s focus on being healthy—and just that.

Logically and biologically, it would follow that by following a healthy way of living, eating and exercising, everything else will find its proper balance. We would lose weight if we needed to lose weight, we’d gain muscle if we needed to gain muscle, we’d balance out all the other things that come from not being healthy—stress, cholesterol, diabetes, poor complexion, hair loss etc.

And what does it mean to live healthily? In the face of all the new diet and exercise schemes, I think that actually, we all already know what it means to live a healthy, balanced, feel-totally-awesome lifestyle, without having to follow any fad or buy any specialized products.

Intuitively, deep down inside, we do know the basics of living well. We know when we’ve had enough to eat, what kinds of foods are good for us, what makes us feel good and what makes us go into a slump, how much exercise we need to do, when to stop when we’re exhausted and when to rest.

We know this not just intellectually, but physically—our bodies are always telling us what we need to do; we just need to listen.

One’s body will tell us when it feels like a massive binge on Chinese take-out. It will also tell us when it’s had enough so we don’t insist on finishing every last fortune cookie. Our bodies will take us dancing, running, swimming, trampolining and playing; but they will also make us rest and sleep.

I read something beautiful a while ago, about how we shouldn’t change our bodies so we can love them.

Instead, we should create change in the way we treat ourselves because we love our bodies.

Ultimately this is about focusing on health: the physical health of our bodies and the emotional health of how we see and relate to our bodies. We love our bodies—this temporary shell on loan to us for this lifetime—so we treat them well, nourish them, feed them, move them, hug them, stretch then, let them dance, discipline them, give them a treat sometimes and most of all enjoy them.

Enjoying our bodies is to indulge in the beautiful, sensual things like good food, good sex and the rush of an energetic run in the mornings. But also, I think enjoyment is about ensuring our bodies are at their prime health so that they truly get the most out of these things and appreciate, at our body’s fullest capacity, the good food, good sex and energetic run.

This is true whatever size we’re at, whether we’re trying to lose weight or gain weight, whether we’re severely overweight or dangerously underweight.

This is true because it’s a matter of health and of helping our bodies be at their optimum functioning levels, not merely a matter of what we look like.

Yes, ideally, I would still like the scales to tell me that I am 10 pounds lighter and to see my dress size drop to a single digit. But then, I have to ask myself what it really is that I’d like to get out of being that much thinner. I don’t have any illnesses, I live a happy, active life, and I’ve been medically cleared for good, prime health.

So what is it? To be more attractive? To feel more energetic? To turn more heads? To tighten that gap between me and the Victoria’s Secret models?

I realize now that if I only just went back to focusing on being healthy, everything else would find its rightful place. When I’m feeling healthy, my skin glows, my hair is shiny and I’m a face full of radiance. When I’m feeling fit after a big run and deep session of yoga, I’m also confident, joyful and there’s an extra bounce in my step.

Automatically, without being a single ounce lighter, I realize now that being healthy alone is enough to be more attractive, feel more energetic, turn more heads and gain almost as many admirers as the Victoria’s Secret angels.

With a focus on health, instead of weight, I find too that I enjoy life a whole lot more. I eat without guilt and play with abandon. I move and shift and indulge the very real needs of my body instead of spending good hours of my day fussing over diet plans, exercise schedules and meal replacement shakes.

It isn’t only when I achieve a vision of thinness that I am deemed healthy and attractive.

I am attractive because I am living healthily.

And if that means I shall always be a little bit fat, with a few extra pounds to shed, then that’s exactly what I shall be.

Written Via 
on Sep 29, 2013 for http://www.elephantjournal.com/2013/09/why-i-will-always-choose-to-be-a-little-bit-fat-jamie-khoo/

Healthy Inspirations Recipe of the Week – Steak with Caramelised Onion & Mushroom Jus

July 14, 2016

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*Grow*Thrive*Blossom*

July 5, 2016

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Written by Glen Barnett, Personal Trainer & Coffs Coast Health Club Owner.

I read a great quote today.  A flower does not think of competing with the flower next to it, it just blossoms.  It got me thinking that a lot of people get turned off by exercising because they feel it can be competitive and that’s something they don’t want to buy into.   Surprisingly, the reality is quite the opposite.  At our health club for instance, most people don’t even pay attention to what the person next to them is doing let alone think of competing with or comparing themselves to them. One thing you may not realise is if you do see people doing things that you actually couldn’t do, then there are always ways to modify them.  Here are some examples:

  • Running on the treadmill becomes walking on the treadmill at a pace that is suitable for you or using the incline button to create more exertion without the impact of running.
  • Upright stationery bike riding becomes recumbent stationery bike riding which can be easier on the knees. Riding can also be on a seated or standing stationery arm cycling where you are cycling on specially designed bikes only using your arms.
  • Doing pushups on the floor becomes pushups against the wall.
  • Doing situp exercises, becomes engaging your core in standing, sitting and movement positions.
  • Cumbersome and confusing weights become simple and effective strength machines
  • Uncomfortable movements and coordination can become guided tuition to meet your needs by an expert in body movement and personal training.

So there is always something you can do. Always a way something can be modified whether you are able bodied or disabled, experienced or inexperienced,  prehabilitating or rehabilitating or just know what you do or don’t want to do.

Call Glen or Jacqui at Coffs Coast Health Club on 66586222 or email Glen on glen@coffscoasthc.com.au and we will happily help you grow, thrive and blossom as an individual.

 

Coffs Coast Health Club eNews – July 2016

July 4, 2016

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Members & Guests Christmas In July Party
christmas in July
Come & join us for some FUN & FRIVOLITY, good food & fabulous company! We love catching up with all of our members & this year we are combining both Toormina & Moonee Club Communities to DOUBLE THE FUN! We have even arranged a courtesy bus for trips both north and south if you wish to indulge.

When: Saturday 16th July
Where: Greenhouse Tavern
Time: 12.30pm until 2.30pm
Food: A yummy lunch of hot and cold finger and cocktail food, pizza, healthy wraps and cheese and fruit platters, followed by a famously delicious Wicked Berries cake!
Drinks: from the bar
Tickets: Available from reception at the clubs or call Toormina on

6658 6222 or Moonee on 6653 6122. Only $15 per adult & $5 per child

A Warm Apple Pie (with Cream) Welcome to our New Dietitian Katie Drury

one stopAre you confused by nutrition? Do you find it difficult to choose the right foods for your health needs? Struggling to lose weight or managing allergies and intolerances? If so, it’s time you got the support you need from our accredited Dietitian.

Katie can help you with:
• Diabetes: if you are newly diagnosed, have irregular blood glucose levels or if you have recently had your medication changed.
• Heart problems: if you have high cholesterol, high triglycerides and/or high blood pressure.
• Allergies: if you suspect food allergies or intolerances i.e. suffering chronic abdominal discomfort, bloating, constipation, diarrhoea.
• Weight loss or unintentional weight loss & poor appetite.
• Sports nutrition if you’re seeking to increase your athletic performance.

Mid North Coast Physio are offering 5 FREE assessments with Katie to help you reach your health goals and discover a happier, healthier version of you. Call 1300 27 37 47 NOW to secure your FREE assessment before they run out!

Tips To Stay Warm In Class This Winter Workout Season

polar bearAs the weather gets cooler we can be tempted to sleep through our alarm in the morning and stay under the doona, or head straight home after a long cold day at work but it is important for your health and well-being that you continue exercising right through the Winter months. In order to boost your immune system, maintain your fitness and keep your mind happy and active, regular exercise is essential.

1. It is warmer inside the gym than it is outside and your favourite class is going to get you hot and sweaty but make sure that you wear layers to and from the club so that your muscles stay warm.  Remove the layers as you warm up during class and then add them back on as you cool off.
2. Hydration is very important and although you may not feel as thirsty when it is cold you need to ensure that you drink before, during and after class.
3. Allow a little extra time before class to warm up on a piece of cardio equipment or by doing some dynamic stretching.  Warming the muscles up adequately will prevent injury.
4. Put your favourite classes in your diary at the start of the week and commit to those work outs like you would any other appointment.
5. If you are finding that you are hitting the snooze button too often why not try leaving your alarm on the other side of the bedroom. Once you are up to switch it off you are up for the day.
6. If you are attending an early morning class lay your workout gear out ready for you to slip in to straight away or even sleep in your gear. If you are heading to the gym after work make sure you have everything in your car ready to go so there is no temptation to head home for any reason before heading to your class.

The great thing about group exercise is that you get to sweat it out with other people who are motivated, inspired and pushed by your instructor.  So don’t hibernate this winter – get in to the club and get warm while you get fitter, stronger and healthier.

The Power of NanoPro Versus Standard Protein Supplements

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We all know that protein is an essential nutrient for the human body, but how do you know which protein is best? We’ve got you covered. Our EXCLUSIVE NanoPro takes protein to a whole new level. It is not just for muscles, it’s a full body internal tissue repair system that helps heal the entire body from the inside, out.

The benefits of NanoPro include:
• The highest bioavailability of any Protein supplement on the market
• Increase lean muscle and bone mass
• Speed recovery time from exercise, injury, illness, or surgery
• Reduce injuries related to working out
• Help maintain a trim, fat-burning, lean body mass
• Stabilize blood sugar and blood lipid levels
• Healthy appetite regulation
• Supports low carb diets
• Cellular detoxification and protection
• Healthy heart, brain, bones, organs, tissue repair
• Support a balanced immune system

NanoPro protein is truly a quantum leap in functional food nutrition that provides optimal health benefits. Coffs Coast Health Club is the exclusive stockist of NanoPro & right now at both Toormina & Moonee, we are offering it for only $79 until SOLD OUT ~ SAVE OVER 10%!

Coffs Harbour Running Festival Training Program

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Are you getting ready for the Coffs Harbour 10km Fun Run? Glen Barnett is running a training program for Beginners to participate in the 10km fun run.

The 9 week program provides all the coaching and support you need to compete in the Coffs Harbour 10km on 4 September 2016! Starting on the 6th July this program will give you what you need to make the distance.

The mid-week session on the track will focus on:
– General fitness
– Breathing technique
– Core strength
– Injury prevention

On Saturdays we do a ‘long run’, and the distances increase as the program progresses. At this distance session we will focus on:
– Pacing and race strategy
– Distance “in your legs”
– Mental focus
– Running form
– Building up endurance

On top of the group sessions there will be a specific day by day training guide which outlines what you should be doing every day to help you be your very best on race day. Cost is only $50 p/week via direct debit or $420 upfront. Contact Glen directly on 0411037097 or glen@coffscoasthc.com.au to book your spot.bsc

40% OFF Women’s BSC Body Active Viper Range

Bodyscience Body Active Viper Collection has been Designed and made in Australia. The limited edition Viper Collection is hand crafted from Bsc’s unique high performance compression fabric. Together with the one of a kind luxe snake skin print in dark shades create an ultra-flattering sexy look on all body types. Available at the Moonee Club reception or call them on 6653 6122.

Short Term Workout Options for Friends and Family

shorttermDo you have friends or family that are in town during the school holidays? Would you like to save them some money & get them working out with you? Well due to popular demand we are now offering some short term workout options for them…

Single Visit – adult only $15, student or baby boomer only $10, incl access during all supervised hours
Week Pass – adult only $29, student or baby boomer only $19, incl access during all supervised hours

Simply see reception at the clubs or call Toormina on 6658 6222 or Moonee on 6653 6122 to take advantage of these offers for a limited time.

Have Your Say & WIN FREE Personal Training

saytowinWin a FREE Personal Training or Weight Loss Consultation by telling us what you need!

We are passionate about helping you succeed with your health and fitness goals, so to make sure we are delivering what you need to achieve your goals, please click the link below to have your say. This survey is brought to you by our Coffs Coast Personal Trainers and our Healthy Inspirations Weight Loss Coaches. You can fill out the survey anonymously or add your details at the end to go into a draw to win a FREE Personal Training or Weight Loss Consultation. This survey is only open until 17th July with the draw taking place the very next day. What you waiting for? Go for it! https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/BK7V2BW

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Our mailing address is:
Coffs Coast Health Club
Link Indoor Leisure Centre, 600B Hogbin Dr, Toormina
Moonee Marketplace, 2B Moonee Beach Rd, Moonee Beach
Coffs Coast, NSW 2452 & 2450
Australia

Glen Barnett discusses the Squat

June 21, 2016

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To squat or not to squat. For most people squatting is not a problem but there are those who find squatting difficult for many reasons.   Let’s check in on your squatting technique because squatting is a really great exercise that is very functional – meaning it is something you do a lot of everyday and probably don’t even realise it.   Here are some examples:  sitting down then standing up from your kitchen chair – that’s a squat, same as sitting and standing from the toilet, the lounge, from the bed, getting out of the car etc etc.  So if you’re having trouble doing any of those things then with some isolated squatting practice you will improve those functional day to day squats. Afterall you do get what you train for.

Squats will also shape your legs and your butt, improve your core strength and back strength and make you stronger throughout your lower body.

Firstly as a simple exercise start with your feet about hip width apart.

  • Breath in then as you exhale stick your butt out
  • Bend your knees
  • Then bend them further to lower your butt down.
  • Stopping before your butt gets to knee height.
  • Keep your back straight (don’t become a hunch back).
  • Keep your head up and eyes forward.
  • Chest out and shoulders back.
  • Weight equal on both feet but lean slightly backward.
  • Drive through outside of heels and sides of feet to stand up! Nice work one done.
  • Can you do 10? If so try 3 sets of 10 with 1minute recovery by walking or jogging on the spot.

Here are some different ways to do a squat; each increases the intensity.

  1. Use a chair – sit down stand up
  2. Add hand weights or a barbell
  3. Add a jump to make it a jump squat
  4. Jump up onto a stair or block then step back down

If you’d like more information then give Jacqui or Glen a call on 66586222 to organise a free session.