Posts Tagged ‘Fitness and Health’

Silly Season Survival Tips

November 9, 2014

silly-seasonThe silly season is approaching. Does that mean you can let go of the wheel? You still have to cope with working a 60-hour week, the kids, the relatives, the dog, the traffic, not to mention dreaded hangovers.

What can you do to help keep your body running so that you don’t fall into a heap come January? Well, the following tips will help support your body and mind while you dance into the wee hours at the many Christmas parties or deal with one too many glasses of bubbly.

Sleep

At the very least try to maintain regular sleep habits most of the time. Sleep allows your body to regenerate on every level and will help you keep an even keel over the Christmas period. If you know you are going to have a few late nights, then plan ahead the week before and even for a few days after to make sure you get home and relax and get into bed on time. Aim for around eight hours of sleep per night.

Diet

It is very important to maintain a healthy diet as much as possible throughout the often junk food-laden days over Christmas and New Year. On the days and nights you aren’t out socialising, make sure you eat homemade meals full of fresh fruits and vegetables, lean protein, whole grains, cold-pressed oils and good quality dairy foods. Try to avoid takeaway as much as possible as it is often over processed, re-heated, laden with fat and salt and chemicals which all take their toll on your body and can leave you feeling sluggish.

Resist the urge to buy junk food such as chips and opt for a fresh fruit platter. A plate full of vegetable sticks with a nice dip is a great choice. Another good alternative is fresh nuts as opposed to the salted and roasted kind.

Stress

The herb Withania somnifera has been long revered as a traditional restorative tonic that helps the body adapt to stress.

Time out

If you do have a lot of social engagements and you’re still trying to keep a cracking pace at work you should still try to have time out alone in a peaceful environment, preferably outside in nature. This will give your body and mind time to wind down and relax and keep you coping with all the craziness over Christmas.

Article sourced here: http://www.blackmores.com.au/learning-centre/article/silly-season-survival-guide

Coffs Coast Health Club eNews – September 2014

September 2, 2014

landscape.burst“Empowering the Coffs Coast to be the happiest & healthiest community in Australia”
#strongertogether   #fitnessnfun   #coffscoasthealthclub

Exclusive Worlds Best Health Supplements HAVE ARRIVED!

nanos overview

Our quest to find the healthiest all natural supplements on the planet took us overseas earlier this year and it may have taken us six months to organise it but finally they have arrived. We tasted and researched over 100 different products before we decided who we would align our brand with. We are now pleased to announce that we hold the exclusive license on the Coffs Coast for the Nano range of products from BioPharma Scientific.
 
Their patented SuperSorb® delivery system allows your body to absorb the maximum amount of the nutritional value for better results, guaranteed. In addition, all of their products are non-GMO, organic, and 100% plant based with absolutely zero synthetic ingredients. They are based on new, scientifically-advanced, physician grade formulas with the highest quality ingredients sourced from the cleanest parts of the world.

Let’s just say their 
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products do all the talking for themselves.

BioPharmaSc’s four most popular products are NanoGreens, NanoProtein, NanoEPA Fish Oil and NanoLean. They can now be purchased through reception individually or as a four pack for 5% OFF.
 
Did you know? Each serve of NanoGreens has the equivalent of 10 serves of organic fruit and vegetables! Have a chat to your trainer about which products are most appropriate for your needs.
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member appreciation day

Member Appreciation Day Was Fantastic!

Thank you to everyone that participated last month on Member Appreciation Day. The classes, the events, the offers & the atmosphere around the club was amazing.

We still have a number of Foundation Member gifts for collection at reception,
so if you were a member on 31st October 2009 & are still a member now, please see the reception team to collect your gift.

The feedback was so positive on the day that we will be making it an annual event.
Days like this are a true testament to the quality of our Coffs Coast Health Club community.

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Last 2014 Personal Trainer Course STARTING SOON!

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The Australian Institute of Personal Trainers is proud to introduce their NEW Certificate IV in Fitness – Complete Personal Trainer and Diploma of Business qualifications package.
 

Fast Track Oct 2014

Start a career as a Personal Trainer and gain the necessary skills to run and manage your own successful fitness business.
 
The Certificate IV in Fitness – Complete Personal Trainer qualification will allow you to gain hands-on practical experience while being able to complete the theory component online and in your own time.
 
As part of your qualification package, you will also complete the Diploma of Business building on the units you completed within your Certificate IV in Fitness and will help you to develop your skills across a wide range of business functions including managing your own business through to being a program coordinator or business manager within a larger business.
 
The Diploma of Business is VET FEE-HELP* approved, so you can study now and pay later – with no time lost!
 
Contact Tracy Welsh, your local campus manager directly on 0429 695 096 for further information.
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Short Term Workout Options for Friends & Family!

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Do you have friends or family that are in town during the school holidays? Would you like to save them some money & get them working out with you? Well due to popular demand we are now offering some short term workout options for them…
 
Single Visit – adult only $15, student or baby boomer only $10, incl access during all supervised hours
Week Pass – adult only $29, student or baby boomer only $19, incl access during all supervised hours
 
See reception or call 6658 6222 to take advantage of these offers for a limited time.
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Kids Club at FIA World Rally Championship!

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The FIA World Rally Championship is coming to Coffs Harbour and Coffs Coast Kids Club will be in the Kids Zone which is part of the FREE fanzone site at the Coffs International Stadium. 
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Among all of the awesome rally events there will also be Kids Yoga and Kids Zumba taking place, Smurfs to play with and lots of Coffs Coast Health Club balloons being given out.  
Saturday: KIDS ZUMBA at 11.30am, KIDS YOGA at 12.15pm,
KIDS ZUMBA at 1.00pm & KIDS YOGA at 1.45pm.
Sunday: KIDS ZUMBA at 11.30am & KIDS YOGA at 12.30pm.
Come along, say hi & have some fun!
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Attack that Summer swimsuit!

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Spring is the perfect time to work on your health and fitness as the warmer weather gets you motivated and inspired to get on track before summer. 
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Why not try a class that is guaranteed to get you fitter, stronger, leaner and healthier? 
 
ATTACK is the high energy sports inspired cardio class that builds strength and stamina and it is on our timetable on Wednesdays at 6.30pm, Thursdays at 9.30am, Fridays at 5.30pm and Saturdays at 8.30am. 
 
There are options to suit everyone so that you can work within your limits and succeed. Give it a try today!
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Help Simone Ride To Conquer Cancer!

simone 2Please help our very own Weight Loss Coach, Childminder & Personal Trainer Simone raise funds for her Ride to Conquer Cancer, a 200 km ride over 2 days, with funds benefiting Chris O’Brien Lifehouse Cancer Research at RPA

 
There will be a delicious 2 course lunch and a silent auction to assist with getting Simone to the start line.
This will be held on Saturday 20th 

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September from 12:00 pm to 2:00 pm at Surf Club Restaurant & Bar. The cost is only $35 per head and with some great lucky door prizes and raffle tickets on offer. It will be a fun event!
 
We are asking everyone to bring something “new” for the silent auction table. You can bring more than one thing if you like, but we’ll have everything set up on the deck for bidding to take place. All items will start at a reserve price of $10.  
 
If you can’t make it to the lunch, please visit her fund-raising page here & donate any amount as it all helps.

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Pilates Is Here!

Personal Training compress

Join in a 12 week Classical Pilates Group Class with a modern twist and reap the rewards.
Pilates dramatically transforms the way your body looks, feels and performs. Give Jacqui 30 minutes of your time once a week and she will
give you the tools to help you build your strength without bulk, make you more aware of your body than you have ever been, improve your posture,
your grace, your flexibility and flatten your stomach in 12 weeks.
$20 a week will be money worth spent to learn valuable mind and body skills that will last you a lifetime.
First class is FREE.

When:     Starts Wed 3rd September

Pilates (1) 2

Time:      10.00am – 10.30am

Where:    Upstairs Circuit & Boxing Studio

Cost:        $20/week

Register:  Reception on 6658 6222 or Jacqui directly on 0421 971 155 or via jacqui@coffscoasthc.com.au but be quick as there are only 7 spots available.

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12 Week Body Makeover Challenge!

12 week makeover

From just $20 a week, Healthy Inspirations are offering you the opportunity to transform yourself before Summer. Reveal the new summer you by taking part in our Body Makeover Challenge.
 
Here are the top 5 reasons to join the challenge:
1.  Lose up to 12kgs
2.  Easy No Hunger Reset Program
3.  Get Accountability with One on One or Group Body Makeover Coaching
4.  Summer is only 12 weeks away
5.  The winner receives a Total Makeover to complete the transformation
 
When:       Starts Monday 1st September
                 Ends Sunday 30th November
Register:   Call or drop in to see Simone 0402 202 864 or Leslie 0423 284 421 in the Healthy Inspirations office
 
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Kids School Holiday Massage Sessions!

Massage Therapy

Book your kids into our School Holiday Massage Sessions, so they can learn the basics of massage while you have your workout. Research shows that children that practice massage become calmer, more concentrated and less 

kids massage

aggressive – what more could you ask for during the holidays?
 
When:       Monday 22nd September 5.30-6.30pm and/or
                 Thursday 25th September 9.30-10.30am
Cost:         $10 per child plus $5 if accompanied by a parent
Age:          6-12 years
Register:   Call reception on 6658 6222 or drop in to see Angela 0417 675 319 in the Upstairs Massage Room.
 
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Personal Trainer Traineeship NOW AVAILABLE!

emily

Yes its that time already… Our wonderful Director of First Impressions
Emily Hodgens will be leaving our frontline soon to continue her study at University. 
 
This means that we will be once again giving one lucky person the opportunity to become a Personal Trainer and gain twelve months work experience in
the regions most awarded health club.
 
We accept applications from anyone of any age with any background, as long as they have a wonderful work ethic and a desire to service our magnificent members. 
 
If you or anyone you know is interested in this exciting career opportunity,
please forward this email to them, get them to complete the application form here & drop
it in to reception before Sunday 7th September.
 
 
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SAVE THIS DATE! Friday 28th November – Members & Guest Christmas Party!

imagesClick here for more information on membership, personal training, weight loss, massage therapy, rehabilitation, group exercise, childminding, privileges card & fitness careers or call us on 6658 6222 for more help.

Invite your friends for a FREE TRIAL & grab yourself a new training buddy!

 

Sincerely,

Your CCHC Team

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Sweet Poison – sugar, it never fully satisfies our cravings.

August 12, 2014

addiction
In the last 24 hours, I’ve drunk several cups of coffee, each one sweetened with a sugar cube. I’ve eaten a bowl of porridge sprinkled liberally with brown sugar and I’ve enjoyed on three separate occasions, a piece of my date and apple birthday cake, to which the chef tells me he added one cup of castor sugar.

This is pretty standard fare for me (birthday celebrations notwithstanding) and although occasionally I fret that my sugar intake is perhaps a little high and that I should reign it in or else risk all manner of health problems down the track, I continue to indulge my sweet tooth. Although after listening to David Gillespie present at Happiness & Its Causes 2011, I’m seriously thinking I really do need to wean myself off the white stuff.

Gillespie, a former lawyer, is the author of Sweet Poison: why sugar makes us fat, whose thesis is that sugar, or more specifically fructose (of which folk are consuming, on average, about one kilo a week), actually does much more that pack on the kilos. It also makes us physically ill and exacts a significant toll on our mental health.

What we’ve come to identify as sugar is actually a combination of two molecules: fructose and glucose, the latter an indispensable element to the body’s healthy functioning. As Gillespie explains, “The glucose half is fine. It’s more than just fine; it’s vitally necessary for us. We are machines that run on the fuel of glucose.” Indeed, all the carbohydrates we consume – and which for most of us constitute about 60 per cent of our diet (everything else is proteins and fats) – are converted to glucose.

Fructose, on the other hand, is not metabolised by us for fuel but rather converted directly to fat. As Gillespie says, “By the time we finish a glass of apple juice, the first mouthful is already circulating in our arteries as fat.” But even worse than that, fructose messes with those hormonal signals which tell us we’re full so that we keep on eating sugary, fatty foods.

Two hormones in particular are affected, the first one being insulin “which responds immediately to the presence of all carbs except fructose,” says Gillespie. “When insulin goes up, appetite goes down. So insulin tells us, ‘all right, you’ve had a meal, stop eating’. Fructose does not provoke a response from insulin and in fact, over time, it makes us resistant to the signals we do get from everything else we eat.”

Leptin is produced by our fat cells and works as our “on board fuel gauge” in that the more fat cells we have, the more leptin we produce and the less hungry we are. The problem with fructose is it “makes us resistant to that signal,” says Gillespie.

And yes, this leads to all manner of health problems including Type 2 Diabetes and its associated symptoms including lethargy, blurred vision and skin infections, and what Gillespie says is “significant damage through something called glycation”, the destruction through the excessive production of so-called AGEs (advanced glycation end products) of our skin’s elasticity which causes hardening of our arteries and brittle skin, both unmistakable signs of ageing. Gillespie also cites some biochemistry studies that have found fructose accelerates the growth of pancreatic cancer tumours.

These are just some of the physical effects. The addictive quality of fructose means it’s also a bit of a downer and that’s because of how it interferes with the balance of two feel-good hormones in the brain, dopamine and serotonin. Gillespie explains, “It significantly ramps up our dopamine (released when we anticipate pleasure) at the expense of our serotonin (released when that pleasure is delivered).” In other words, it never fully satisfies our cravings, and as anyone who’s battled an addiction knows, unfulfilled cravings are never much fun.

Article sourced from: http://www.thinkandbehappy.com.au/eating-way-health-happiness/

Reflexology … what’s it all about?

August 5, 2014

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Reflexology is massage of the feet or hands that aims to promote healing in other areas of the body. Modern reflexology is based on the principle that the foot has ‘reflex’ points that correspond to the various structures and organs throughout the body. For example, on the left foot, the tip of the big toe corresponds to the brain’s left hemisphere.

Many ancient cultures, including the Egyptians and Chinese, practised foot therapy as a form of healing. In the early 20th century, the Americans Dr William Fitzgerald and physiotherapist Eunice Ingham rediscovered and refined the techniques.

Reflex points

According to the philosophy of reflexology, all the organs, glands and parts of the body have representing reflexes on the feet. Any health problem in the body can usually be detected in the corresponding area of the foot. The left foot generally relates to any organs, glands etc on the left side of the body while the right foot relates to any organs, glands etc on the right side

Practitioners believe that by massaging or stimulating the reflexes using specific techniques there will be a direct effect on the corresponding organ.

A reflexologist may interpret foot marks or problems such as corns and calluses as an indication of a possible health imbalance in the corresponding area of the body.

A range of disorders

Supporters of reflexology believe that it can effectively treat a wide range of disorders including:

  • Stress
  • Circulation problems
  • Impaired immunity
  • Digestive disorders
  • Hormonal imbalances
  • Reproductive problems
  • Sleep problems
  • Lack of energy
  • Oedema (swelling)
  • Common childhood complaints such as colic, teething pain and bed-wetting
  • Emotional problems.

The procedure

A typical session lasts approximately one hour. The practitioner first asks detailed questions about lifestyle and prior and current medical problems. The patient sits or reclines on a couch with their feet bare, while the practitioner examines the feet before working on all the areas of the feet.

Generally speaking, the greater the degree of tenderness felt by the patient, the more likelihood there will be a possible imbalance in the corresponding area of the body. The practitioner relaxes the feet with gentle massage, and then works on the reflex points using specific techniques. Practitioners are well used to handling feet and apply sufficient pressure so that ticklishness should not be a problem! Reflexology is not meant to hurt, but should be felt. Strong pressure does not necessarily have a greater effect on the reflexes.

Medical evidence is still limited

Foot massage, including reflexology, encourages relaxation and improves circulation in the feet. However, clinical trials on the efficacy of reflexology as treatment for other health problems have produced mixed results. For example:

  • Premenstrual symptoms – in one study to assess reflexology as treatment for premenstrual symptoms, participants who received weekly therapy reported, on average, a reduction of symptoms by 62 per cent.
  • In another study, the benefits of reflexology were no different to the benefits of regular foot massage performed by people with no training in reflexology.

For further information regarding clinical trials and the efficiency of reflexology go to www.reflexology–research.com

General cautions

Treatment for foot problems such as corns, calluses, bunions and ingrown toenails are not in the scope of practise of a Reflexologist and should be treated by a podiatrist. In particular, people with diabetes are prone to serious foot problems and should be guided by their doctor about appropriate treatment. Reflexology can be an excellent therapy for people with diabetes, however if in doubt about your medical condition it is always recommended that you consult with your doctor before seeing a reflexologist.

Reflexologists do not diagnose, prescribe or treat specific conditions. If an imbalance was detected in a particular reflex during a treatment, the practitioner is likely to refer you to a doctor to get checked. Do not stop any medical treatments on the advice of your reflexologist.

Choosing a reflexologist

To find a reputable and qualified reflexologist in your area, contact the Reflexology Association of Australia. All professional practitioners have undergone extensive training, hold a current Level 2 first aid certificate, have professional indemnity insurance and can provide you with a professional receipt that you can use to claim back part of the treatment from participating private health insurance companies.

Where to get help

  • Your doctor
  • Reflexologist
  • Podiatrist
  • Reflexology Association of Australia Tel. 0500 502 250
  • Australian Podiatry Association (Vic) Tel. (03) 9866 5906

Things to remember

  • Reflexology is massage of the feet that aims to promote healing in other areas of the body.
  • Modern reflexology is based on the principle that the foot has ‘reflex’ points that correspond to the various structures and organs throughout the body.
  • Always consult your doctor if you have a medical condition.

Article sourced from: http://www.betterhealth.vic.gov.au/bhcv2/bhcarticles.nsf/pages/Reflexology

Healthy Inspirations Recipe of the Week – Hungarian Mushroom Soup

June 26, 2014

Healthy Inspirations Recipe of the Week - Hungarian Mushroom Soup

Give Up Alcohol for a Month

June 15, 2014

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“The threshold of addiction is a foggy place,” writes Nina Caplan. An enthusiastic drinker, she decides to give up alcohol for a month …

I am not an alcoholic. I don’t get sick, fall down or start my day with tots of whiskey. But I do love wine. I am entranced by the socio-historical and chemical properties of the vine. It is, for me, an intellectual pursuit–albeit one that is also literally intoxicating.

The threshold of addiction is a foggy place. You more or less know when you’re dependent, and you know when you’re independent.

But most of us stumble around somewhere in between: we’ll just have one more; we don’t need it, we just like it; we could stop anytime. My social life runs on alcohol like a bicycle on its tyres: it could keep moving without it, but the ride would be bumpy and uncomfortable and I would worry about looking foolish.

So I decided to give up drinking for a month. How hard could it be? Not that I thought it would be easy: not only do I enjoy drinking, but also I am good at it. I merrily buy fine wine and hold it well. Yet given my lack of discipline, going completely without seemed easier than moderation. I believe La Rochefoucauld had it right when he said, “Moderation is the feebleness and sloth of the soul, whereas ambition is the warmth and activity of it.”

Supportive friend:  “Seriously? For a whole month? Wow. You should write about it. People love to read about the misery of others.”

Less supportive friend:  “In January? Are you mad? What other joys are there at this time of year?”

Even less supportive friend:  “I’m just off out for a lovely evening of dinner, chat and lots of red wine. Oh, and martinis. Envious?”

So I did it. It’s not difficult. Just dull. I felt unsociable. I missed the glow of self-satisfaction that alcohol brings, and the clear division it offers between work and recreation. I would cook dinner for a friend, watch her down half a bottle of wine and feel guilty for not joining her. (It was like when I gave up smoking years ago: I hated being unable to provide the comfort of cigarettes to others.) I missed feeling like part of a tradition of literary self-destruction.

When fellow journalists toasted a departing colleague with bad cava, I sipped water and felt gloomy. I attended a drinks awards ceremony (masochistically, surely) and realised I couldn’t be bothered to talk to anybody. How does one negotiate the cracks in social discourse without alcohol? All of those conversations you would rather not have, all those people you want to talk to but don’t know where to start. How do you extricate yourself from an undesirable tete-a-tete when your exit line is “I really must get some more Pelligrino”? I hadn’t realised just how much fun I thought I was having simply because I had a glass in my hand.

Horrified friend: “Never give up booze. Ever.”

I didn’t miss drunkenness, which I rarely indulge in anyway. Nor did I miss the bad free wine at book parties and theatre openings, as guzzling the unworthy stuff leads to a hangover and little else. I did not pine for pub culture, which mostly involves drinking terrible wine so that the men you’re with can down lager and stare at a television behind your head.

But I did miss selecting just the right wine to accompany a dish at a dinner party (food-and-wine pairing is my favourite party game), and the glass I would sip as I cooked. I missed the bubbles that would dance the Charleston over my tongue in the first sip of champagne at the start of a smart evening, and the rich, spiced raisin of an armagnac at the end of a decadent meal.

Though it turns out that what I missed the most did not involve alcohol consumption at all. For me the biggest boozy pleasure is slavering over a good wine list. It seems I’m less a hedonist than a fantasist. Anticipation is silkier on the tongue than the finest vintage.

The month felt long. I don’t mean time dragged–in fact, the long, free evenings I’d envisioned never materialised. I still went out all the time, and did precious little exercise (despite all those nights of quality REM sleep). But there were no elisions, no blurring of events between the first shared bottle and the second. For a month everything I did was clearly delineated.

So what else did I learn after a month of stone-cold sobriety? That it’s over-rated. There is a reason why people drink proportionally more the less they like themselves: alcohol takes you, as so much slang for drunkenness has it, out of your head. I’m no self-loathing Hemingway or Parker, but a month is a long time in your own uninterrupted company

. Nobody wants to spend that much time with me–not even me. This is despite the fact that I found abstinence to be good for my self-esteem, not the other way round. People keep asking me if I feel healthier. I don’t, particularly. But I do feel smug.

I discovered that I use alcohol the way Susie Orbach claims women use fat: as a locus for blame, a red herring. Off the sauce, I was still tired, lazy and prone to overeating carbohydrates and chocolate. I still spent too much money, talked too much and went out too much. In fact, none of my problems can be blamed on drinking alcohol, except the one that involves drinking a little too much.

With my month over, I’m faced with the real challenge: moderation. Bacchus help me, for my own inclinations certainly won’t.

Article sourced from http://www.moreintelligentlife.com/story/alcohol

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Healthy Inspirations Recipe of the Week – Berries & Yoghurt with Roasted Muesli Crumble

December 6, 2012

Healthy Inspirations Coffs Coast

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Serves 2

1 dairy protein | 1 fruit carb | 1 grain/starchy carb | 1 fat

Ingredients:

  • 1 Tbsp shredded coconut
  • 3 Tbsp raw oats
  • 2 Tbsp wheatgerm
  • 2 tsp mixed raw sunflower and sesame seeds
  • 1 Tbsp slivered almonds
  • 1 tsp ground cinnamon
  • 400 g diet berry yoghurt
  • 1 punnet strawberries
  • 100 g frozen raspberries

Directions:

  1. Preheat oven to 220C. To make muesli crumble place coconut, oats, wheatgerm, seeds, almonds and cinnamon on a non-stick tray lined with baking paper. Bake 15 mins or until golden brown.
  2. Place ¼ of the yoghurt into 2 clear glasses. Scatter with ¼ each of the berries. Sprinkle about 2 Tbsp muesli crumble over berries, then repeat with remaining yoghurt, berries and crumble.

Sugar on the Brain

October 20, 2012

Sugar on the brain
Recent research has shown that the instinct to consume foods that contribute to poor health and fitness may come from a previously unsuspected area of the brain – and one which may be able to be targeted to prevent compulsive consumption of sugary treats.

In an experiment involving rats, the brain’s inability to resist sweet and fatty foods was highlighted. The culpable area of the brain, however, was one which has hitherto not been suspected – the neostriatum. This area produces a chemical that enhances desire and which, therefore, may be partially responsible for the compulsion to eat more than the body needs.

Lead study researcher and graduate student in biopsychology at the University of Michigan, Alexandra DiFeliceantonio, said ‘Previously, people thought this area of the brain was only involved in motor function and learning, but we found it’s involved in motivation and generating instant consumption’.

Although the findings were applicable to the rodents in the study, DiFeliceantonio speculated that they may have implications for humans, and that if that is the case, drugs could potentially be used to target the area and suppress the compulsion to overeat.

In the study, rats that had been given a drug to enhance the action of the neostriatum consumed twice as many M&Ms as they ate under normal control conditions. The volume they consumed was equated to a human eating 3.2kg of M&Ms in an hour.

Commenting on the findings, Dr David Katz, director of the Yale University Prevention Research Center, said ‘We tend to like flavours, such as sweet, that in nature are associated with life-sustaining foods, and tend to dislike flavours, such as bitter, more often associated with toxins.’

While this instinct served our ancestors well with regards finding sources of energy in environments where sweet foodstuffs were scarce and levels of physical activity were high, in today’s artificially sugar-rich world, it may be achieving the opposite – leading to obesity and associated diseases.

‘But the fault here is not with the world within us, which is the same as it ever was’ said Katz; ‘It is with what and how much people eat, which has made the brain’s natural functioning “backfire rather badly”.’

Source: Current Biology