Posts Tagged ‘Coffs Coast Health Club Moonee’

KIDS WITH TYPE 2 DIABETES IS RISING. BUT DIETARY CHANGES CAN HELP

November 4, 2017

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Data from the huge SEARCH for Diabetes in Youth study – that includes more than a whopping 20,000 participants – reports the incidence of type 2 diabetes is increasing in our children.1 We are talking a 7% rise annually between 2002 and 2012.

Until recently, type 2 diabetes was referred to as ‘adult-onset’. Now, kids as young as 3 years are being diagnosed.

Type 2 diabetes is largely preventable, yet can lead to significant health issues, including cardiovascular disease,2 blindness, amputations and even reduced length of life. This is aside from onerous the day-to-day monitoring and management, and symptoms such as depression and a poorer quality of life.3;4

Causes of type 2 diabetes are multifactorial, with familial, lifestyle and environmental factors at play.

From a dietary perspective, to reduce the risk of developing the condition here are some things to consider for you and your kids.

Reduce added sugar intake
Surprise! Too much sweet stuff may contribute to the onset of type 2 diabetes – especially regular consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages. Leave the highly refined sweet stuff behind, and replace with whole foods like fruit and healthful drinks like water and unsweetened tea.

Replace refined and heavily processed foods with real foods
Any food far removed from its original state should be limited. Heavily refined oils and trans-fats should be replaced with less processed oils and healthy fats, such as olive oil, nuts, avocado and oily fish.

Fibre-less flours can be just as detrimental to the body as added sugars. Instead, choose whole foods that are low in glycaemic load, swapping white rice for quinoa, or white flour for ground buckwheat, coconut or almond meal. 

Create a healthy gut
The state of our intestinal microbiome can influence our health in a variety of ways. Recent research indicates the prevalence of certain gut bugs may be linked to precursors of type 2 diabetes. Considering our diet hugely affects which microbial populations of the intestine thrive or decline, more attention should be paid to keeping those helpful guts bugs nourished to keep the unhelpful ones at bay.

A great place to start is limiting intake of heavily processed foods while ensuring fibre intake is up and enjoying some fermented foods.

Stabilize blood glucose fluctuations
Enabling blood sugar highs followed by almighty lows increases the risk for pre-diabetes and type 2 diabetes. You can manage the blood sugar swing by eating regularly throughout a day, ensuring meals and snacks are comprised of ingredients offering fibre, healthy fats and protein. This offers a slow, steady release of energy to the body and therefore avoids the extreme fluctuation in blood glucose levels and high demand for insulin production. 

Enjoy plenty of anti-inflammatory foods
Blood concentrations of inflammatory markers such as CRP, TNF-a, & IL-6 are elevated in type 2 diabetes. While inflammation has it’s role in the body – such as healing the skin of a grazed knee – we don’t want to be living in high and chronically inflamed state. Choose to eat foods that keep inflammation in check, such as leafy greens, deep coloured berries, fresh herbs and spices, and heaps of vegetables.

Chat with a pro
Overall, if you’ve concerns or a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes has already been made, please do chat with your trusted healthcare professional. They can run tests and work with you on a personalized diet, lifestyle and (if necessary) medical treatment plan to help turn type 2 diabetes around.

By Angela Johnson (BHSc Nut. Med)

http://thatsugarfilm.com/blog/2017/10/12/kids-with-type-2-diabetes-is-rising-but-dietary-changes-can-help/

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How to Do a Kettlebell Swing

October 8, 2017

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“The kettlebell swing is the ultimate single exercise to improve strength, endurance, coordination, stability of the hips and core, and grip strength,” says Grant Anderson, co-owner and director of strength at Chicago Primal Gym. The move involves your whole body from start to finish, so it forces your cardiovascular and muscular systems to work together, which translates well to outdoor sports. And a set of swings is a total sufferfest, so you’re building some serious mental grit in the process.

“Many people are quad dominant,” says Noam Tamir, founder of TS Fitness in New York City. “Kettlebell swings fire up the hip-dominant muscles rather than the quads, which helps to bring balance to the body.” Translation: Your body will distribute weight and effort more equally, which is crucial if you want to prevent injury and maximize performance.

There are two types of basic kettlebell swings: the Russian version and the American version. You may have seen people doing the American swing in the gym or at a CrossFit box, where they swing the bell up and overhead, but this can be dangerous if you don’t know what you’re doing. “There isn’t much more gained from going overhead with the kettlebell, but there is a lot more risk,” says Tamir. Without proper mobility, this move can put pressure on the neck and possibly throw you out of alignment. The overhead position also makes it difficult not to go into hyperextension of the lower back, says Tamir, which could lead to injury. The Russian swing—where you stop swinging the bell upwards at eye-level and bring it back down—is your best bet: You’ll avoid injury and get the same physical payoffs.

Perfect the Basic Swing

If you’re brand new to the kettlebell, start with a 16-kilogram (35-pound) option; but if you have a little experience, use a 24-kilogram (53-pound) bell. That may sound heavy for your first swing, but going big can actually help you learn better technique and going too light can downgrade the impact of the exercise, says Anderson. “Doing swings with light bells is often counterproductive, because your upper body can easily take over the load,” he explains. This leaves your hips and hammies—the main targeted areas—out of the exercise.

Start by standing with your feet just wider than shoulder-width apart, toes turned slightly out and the kettlebell about a foot in front of you. Hinge your hips back so your chest and eyes are pointed toward the ground about five feet in front of you. Reach and grab the handle of the bell with an overhand grip, tilting the bell back toward you. Your shoulders are higher than your hips, and your hips higher than your knees. Sharply inhale through your nose as you hike the bell back between your legs, keeping it high above your knees. Sharply exhale through your mouth as you stand quickly, driving your feet into the ground and bracing your body in a “vertical plank,” squeezing your glutes and quads and bracing your abs. As you do, keep your arms straight and use the momentum of your hip thrust to bring the bell in front of your chest. Let the bell hang there around shoulder height for just a moment. Bring the bell back down toward hip height by hinging your hips back; repeat. Repeat in sets of five to ten reps.

Scale It Up

After you’ve learned the basic swing and progressed with heavier loads to the point where doing more than three or four swings feels very difficult, these variations will spice up your training so you continue to improve, says Tamir.

Single-Arm Swing

How It Helps: Focusing on a single arm forces you to practice grip strength and activates the smaller stabilizer muscles in your shoulder.

How to Do It: Set up the same way as you do for a double-arm swing, but grip the kettlebell with one hand. Line up the free hand parallel to the hand that’s gripping the kettlebell. When swinging the kettlebell backward between your legs, your free hand should mimic the movement pattern, parallel to the arm in use. Continue the hinge motion as you would if both your hands were on the bell.

Alternate KB Swings

How It Helps: This progression builds hand-eye coordination and teaches your muscles how to react quickly to changing demands.

How to Do It: Set up the same way as you do for the single-arm swing, but when the bell reaches shoulder height, transfer it to the other hand by placing the free hand over the working hand and quickly exchanging the kettlebell to the other hand during the floating phase. Continue the swing, switching hands at the top of each swing.

KB Clean

How It Helps: This exercise develops strength in the entire legs while working on muscle control during tighter, smaller movements.

How to Do It: Set up the same way as you do for the single-arm swing. As you hinge forward and bring the bell toward your chest, loosen your grip when the bell reaches your hips. Quickly tuck your elbow back toward your body so it touches your side and turn your palm inward so it’s facing your head. The bell should fall naturally over the top of your wrist. Return to the backswing by rotating your hand down toward the ground with the thumb facing your body and the pinkie facing away from you, keeping the kettlebell as close to your body as you can and swinging back through your legs.

Article sourced here: https://www.outsideonline.com/2243661/how-do-kettlebell-swing

Asparagus, capsicum and goats cheese frittata

August 17, 2017

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We love a good frittata: they’re easy, healthy and super-tasty. Enjoy this one for any main meal, or slice it into smaller squares and use as an appetiser. Serves 4

Ingredients

4 Tbsp olive oil
2 bunches asparagus, sliced into 2cm pieces
8 large eggs
¾ cup roasted red capsicum, diced
60g goat cheese, crumbled
1 spring onion, sliced
1 Tbsp chopped fresh parsley
½ tsp salt
¼ tsp pepper
¼ cup chopped fresh basil

Method

  1. Heat a large ovenproof skillet over moderate heat. Add half the olive oil and the asparagus. Cover and cook, stirring occasionally, until asparagus is tender, about 7 – 8 minutes. Uncover to let moisture evaporate, then remove from heat and let asparagus cool.
  2. Lightly beat the eggs in a medium bowl. Add the asparagus, capsicum, cheese, spring onion, parsley, salt and pepper. Mix gently.
  3. Heat the skillet over moderate heat, add remaining oil and heat for 30 seconds. Pour in the egg mixture and cook, stirring gently from the outside edge to the centre until the eggs are set on the sides and soft in the centre, about 6 – 7 minutes.
  4. Meanwhile, heat the grill. Place the skillet under the grill and cook until the eggs are set and the top is golden brown. Loosen the frittata from the pan and place a large plate upside-down on the pan and, using both hands and pot holders, invert the frittata. Sprinkle with basil and serve.

Coffs Coast Health Club eNews – August 2017

August 1, 2017

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JOIN IN AUGUST TO RECEIVE YOUR TOTAL HEALTH PACKAGE
This month we have organised a very special membership deal alongside our friends at Mid North Coast Physiotherapy. Any new members who join at either Toormina or Moonee on a 12 month pay-as-you-go membership in August will receive a ‘Total Health Package’ which consists of:

–    A 24/7 Membership including access to ALL CLASSES
–    A Personal Training Session
–    A Massage Session
–    A Physiotherapy Consult
–    A Nutrition Consult 

This package is valued at well over $300 and is limited to the first 25 people, so get in quick to secure one for yourself this month. Call 1300 040 479, email lee@coffscoasthc.com.au for Moonee or tori@coffscoasthc.com.au for Toormina, or you can join online now.

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Join Our 12 Week Outdoor Bootcamp

Get summer body ready with our 12 Week Outdoor Bootcamp! Starting on the 2nd of September we will be running a 12 week Bootcamp to get you ready for summer. With 3 weekly sessions run by Jazz O’Meagher, one of our wonderful Personal Trainers, and options to suit everyone, this is the perfect way to get that summer body you’ve been dreaming about!

WHEN: Monday & Thursday nights @ 6pm, Saturday morning @ 8am
WHERE: Rex Hardaker Oval, next to the Toormina Club
COST: Weekly Direct Debit pricing – $10/1session, $15/2 sessions $20/3 sessions OR pop in for a casual session for $15

With varied, challenging and FUN outdoor workouts each session, find your summer body motivation this Spring! Hurry, spots are limited so sign up now at Toormina Reception. For more information please call Jazz on 0415 238 461.

 

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WHO YOU GONNA CALL? PAIN BUSTERS
Jack Gillingham, born and bred Sawtell local, jumped at the opportunity to come back to the area to work with Mid North Coast Physio in a field where he can give back to the Coffs Coast community. Jack has a wealth of experience as a Physiotherapist after graduating from the University of Newcastle with honours and loves helping people to make an improvement in their lives and getting them closer to achieving their health goals.

Here is Jack’s list of what to expect in a Physiotherapy Consultation:

•    A discussion about your reason for coming to a physiotherapist, your goals, and what you would like to achieve from the service.
•    A thorough assessment to diagnose the cause of your issues. This may include – measuring your movement and strength; a postural assessment; special tests to check your ligaments, tendons, and nerves; a balance assessment; a biomechanical and gait analysis
•    A recommended plan of action advising you the key issues, your diagnosis and what needs to be done to address the problems to achieve your best outcome.
•    Treatment, which may involve any of the following – soft tissue releases; joint mobilisation and manipulation; trigger point dry needling; taping; a personalised exercise program; custom orthotic prescription; referral to one of our other health experts.
•    Education – During your consult, you can expect a clear explanation of what’s wrong and what needs to be done so you leave knowing what is the problem, why it has occurred, and how you can prevent it from happening again.  Don’t leave feeling like you’re left in the dark!

If you’re living with an injury, having issues with your joints, have frequent back pain or any other muscular complaints and need a solution then Jack is your man! If you would like to see how Jack can help, Mid North Coast Physio are offering 10 FREE physiotherapy assessments this month.  To secure your spot call 1300 27 37 47

6d6c6e0e-25bc-4dd5-a01f-38a05e7a135bAre You New to Fitness Passport?

We’ve got you covered! For the month of August, Fitness Passport Members are invited to book a complimentary Health Check and Program with one of our wonderful trainers (valued at $75). This tailored session includes health testing, as well as a customised exercise program to help you reach your goals, whether they be strength, weight loss, functional or general fitness related.

Call or email your favourite club now to book in and get started as there are limited sessions available at both clubs. Call 1300 040 479, or email moonee@coffscoasthc.com.au or toormina@coffscoasthc.com.au

Healthy Inspirations Recipe of the Month!
 

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Tasty Snack Alert
Introducing Blue Dinosaur Paleo Bars – real food, made with real ingredients, for real people.These delicious bars are the perfect snack or dessert and taste pretty good blended through a smoothie as well. Blue Dinosaur Bars are:
  • All Natural
  • Gluten Free
  • Vegan Friendly
  • Free of added sugar
  • A great source of fibre
  • Contain only 5 ingredients per bar.
We will be stocking Blue Dinosaur Bars at both Toormina and Moonee in a range of delicious flavours – so make sure you keep an eye out for taste tests during August. The best part is these bars are affordable, at just $4 for a single bar or $40 for a box of 12! Try one of these tasty, convenient and HEALTHY on-the-go snacks for yourself today.

 

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ZUMBA Studio Class with Michael Thomas
You may have heard the exciting news that international ZUMBA star Michael Thomas is coming to Coffs Harbour to present a ZUMBA GOLD party at the Sawtell RSL on Saturday the 12th of August – don’t forget to get your tickets through our ZUMBA instructors Debbie Leaney and Mandy Farrow.

While Michael is in Coffs Harbour we thought we would use this opportunity to organise an extra special treat for all our ZUMBA loving members and guests!
Michael will be presenting a special one off ZUMBA Studio Class at Coffs Coast Health Club Toormina on Friday the 11th of August at 5.30pm.

When: Friday 11th of August
Time: 5.30pm – 6.30pm
Where: Main Studio at Coffs Coast Health Club Toormina
Cost: Only $10 for members and guests – Tickets are at reception on the night

This class is sure to be AMAZING and will be an event to remember!
So grab a friend and shimmy your way into the weekend.

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Warm Up Your Winter With Belle Odori Candles
Belle Odori Candles produce a unique range of beautiful candles all individually hand-poured using 100% Eco-friendly wax. All candles are made using 100% pure natural professional grade soy wax. This allows the candles to burn longer, cleaner and leave a long-lasting aroma throughout your home. You will love the flame and soft crackling sound created by the unique wooden wicks.

Listen as these beautiful candles imitate the sound of a crackling fire that helps create a warm tranquil ambience – perfect for those cold winter nights. These soy candles contain NO GMO material, NO paraffin, NO unnatural additives, they are kosher certified and are NOT TESTED ON ANIMALS. Most importantly, they smell amazing! 

We stock these beautiful candles at both Toormina and Moonee in a range of delicious scents: Lychee & Black Tea, Coconut & Lime, Cinnamon & Vanilla, French Pear and Salted Caramel. Plus as a special offer this August, receive 10% off all Belle Odori Candles.

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A Big Welcome to Josh
Josh has recently joined the Coffs Coast Health Club team and is a jack-of-all-trades. Not only is Josh a qualified Personal Trainer, he’s not too shabby on the tools either! Josh will be taking on new clients at both our Toormina and Moonee Clubs, as well as helping out with the maintenance at Toormina.

Josh is passionate about the fitness industry and the role that he can play in your fitness journey as a Personal Trainer. He loves to train clients that need a little extra motivation and support in order to reach their goals, whatever those may be!

If you see Josh on the floor, have a chat and introduce yourself and make him feel welcome to the Coffs Coast Health Club Family.

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Last 2017 Personal Trainer Course STARTING SOON
Live your dream in 2018! The fitness industry is booming. With an increased focus on health and fitness, there is unprecedented growth and demand for high-quality personal trainers and fitness professionals.

“Personal Training courses are not all created equal. I started an online one & I ended up wasting my time & money. This course run by Dan is so interactive & fun! I am gaining all of the skills & confidence I need to become a personal trainer in a real gym with motivation from real people. I see why AIPT are the leaders now, I love it!” R. Sampson

Get qualified and learn in the region’s most awarded health club, from the region’s most experienced personal trainers. Our very own Daniel Tempest is taking applications right now for the final Personal Training course this year and with ONLY a few positions left, your time is running out to turn your dream into reality.

Call the Coffs Coast Campus Manager Dan on 0432 579 221 or email him via coffscoast@aipt.com.au for further information.

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Coffs Cup Half Day Public Holiday!
Enjoy your Half Day Public Holiday, experience the great outdoors & spend some quality time with quality people on Thursday 3rd August, as Toormina will be supervised 5.30am-12noon and Moonee will be supervised 8am-12noon. Both clubs will be unsupervised in the afternoon.

All morning classes, kids club, physio, massage and personal training appointments will still occur. All 24/7 members still have the freedom to access the club at any time to work out on their terms with their 24/7 keytag. Speak to reception to find out if your membership allows you 24/7 access & if not, its only a $2 per week upgrade.

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Upcoming Events In August
Thursday 3rd – Coffs Cup Race Day
Friday 11th – Celebrity Zumba Studio Class @ Toormina
Saturday 12th – Zumba Party @ Sawtell RSL
Wednesday 16th – Living Well Disability Expo @ C.ex Coffs

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Healthy Inspirations Recipe of the Week – Choc orange, cinnamon & turmeric bliss balls

July 27, 2017

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Makes 18

Ingredients

1 cup almond meal
1 cup Shaken Jamaican protein powder
10 dried dates
pinch salt
zest one orange
1 tsp cinnamon powder
1/2 tsp turmeric powder
1/2 cup shredded coconut
1/3 cup water

Method

  1. Combine Food process almond meal and Shaken Jamaican powder.
  2. Add dates and blend until well chopped.
  3. Add salt, zest, cinnamon, turmeric and coconut and pulse.
  4. Add water gradually while blending. The mixture should roll into balls without being sticky, so add more water or add coconut or almond meal to ensure the consistency is right.
  5. Roll into 18 balls and refrigerate until ready to eat.

Kill your sugar cravings with these 7 foods

July 18, 2017

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So, you’ve ditched the sweet stuff. For the first few days you’re flying high on green veggies and avocado – feeling like a brand new you.

But then, your body starts to realise that you’ve taken away ALL the sugar! Your brain’s sugar craving hormones begin to have a sweet little meltdown and you find yourself longing for that morning muffin, muesli bar and after dinner treat (read: half a pack of biscuits!).

If this sounds all too familiar, don’t sweat it. You’re not alone! We’ve all felt overwhelmed by our sugar cravings at some point (yes, even us) so here are some of the best sugar craving busters we’ve discovered at IQS.

1. Coconut oil.

This is a tried-and-tested trick in the IQS repertoire. “After lunch I still get sweet, ‘I need something more’ cravings,” says Sarah. “So this is my fail-proof trick. I eat two tablespoons of coconut oil. It satisfies my need for something sweet and KILLS appetite for about four to five hours.”

2. Liquorice tea.

The IQS team must literally sweat liquorice tea – we’re all drinking it! With the most amazing sweet aftertaste, you’ll have a hard time believing that it’s naturally sugar-free (unlike the liquorice sweets you can buy).

3. Sweet potato.

Sweet potato (or kumara) is one of the most delicious foods on this planet – fact. The very small amount of sugar will satisfy your cravings, while the starch stops you from overdoing it. Oh, and did we mention that sweet potatoes are ridiculously good for you?

4. Carrot sticks.

Carrots are another sweet veggie with lots of fibre to fill you up. Keep an emergency box of carrot sticks in the fridge, ready to be dipped into guacamole or hummus when the cravings strike.

5. Kombucha.

One of the things people miss most when they quit sugar is soft drinks. We suggest you skip the crappy diet pop and go for 100ml of gut-lovin’ kombucha when you need a fizzy hit. Just make sure it’s a low-sugar brand (we prefer it to be around 1g of sugar per 100ml).

6. Nut butter.

Nuts are full of good fats and proteins, making them perfect for sugar cravings. Almonds and cashews are naturally sweet, too. (Hot tip: if you make your own nut butter, add a heaped teaspoon of cinnamon to the mix to make the most delicious thing you’ve ever tasted.)

7. 85 per cent dark chocolate.

While you’ll have to give up your Twix bars, there’s nothing wrong with a little good quality cacao. A 100g block of 85 per cent dark chocolate has just over a teaspoon of sugar (not that you could finish a whole block!). To take it even further, try a 90 per cent dark chocolate. So good.

We originally published this post in June 2016. We updated it in June 2017.
Source here: https://iquitsugar.com/food-kill-sugar-cravings

​How to take a break from drinking alcohol

July 16, 2017

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So you’ve taken on a challenge to take a break from drinking – well done! As well as saving you money and giving you back your Sunday mornings, drinking less comes with a bunch of health benefits.

Of course, it’s not realistic for most of us to quit drinking completely forever. As with most things, moderation is the key for long term healthy living. But for many people, cutting out alcohol completely for a set period such as a month (like FebFast or Dry July) can be a great way to pause, notice how much you’re drinking and how it’s impacting you, and reset your habits.

“If you feel you are drinking too much and it has become a habit, taking a break may just be the way to kick-start changes to that habit.”

Why drink less?

Alcohol is an accepted part of the social structure of Australia, but it is a substance that has the potential to cause a great deal of harm. The effects of alcohol on health are well described and unfortunately, most of it is on the negative side of the health ledger.

Alcohol is a major cause of road injury and a significant contributor to domestic violence while higher rates of heart disease, liver disease, cancer, mental health problems and excess weight are all consequences of long-term heavy drinking. And let’s not forget about the ‘next day’ ill effects from an evening of over-exuberance.

Fortunately, most Australians who drink alcohol do so at levels that have few adverse problems. Low levels of drinking may have some favourable benefits on cardiovascular disease risk (at least in middle-aged people), but other healthy activities like exercise and eating well can give even greater benefits for a whole range of health issues.

“In place of that after-work drink, use a juicer to come up with some speciality fruit and vegetable juices and smoothies.”

Tips for changing your habits

Instead of treating your break from alcohol as just an exercise in willpower, use it as a chance to give your attention to other healthy changes you can make in place of the alcohol you are giving up. If you feel you are drinking too much and it has become a habit, taking a break may just be the way to kick-start changes to that habit.

The key to changing a habit is not eliminating it, but replacing it with something else. And that something else should be a healthier habit. Using these swaps gives you a ‘go to’ when faced with triggers for the habit you’re trying to break.

Focus on what you are gaining, not what you are losing. Here are some tips to help you with this:

  • Remove temptations. Make your home as free from alcohol as possible and put away any alcohol you have stored such as wine and spirits out of sight – you don’t want the reminder of what you’re giving up when you get home after a hard day.
  • Replace with healthier beverages. In place of that after-work drink, use a juicer to come up with some speciality fruit and vegetable juices and smoothies. Don’t have a quality juicer? The money you’ll save from not drinking will easily finance this.
  • Get outside and get moving. Take advantage of waking up not feeling seedy on a weekend as a chance to get out for some early morning activity. Checking out the weekend farmers’ markets would be the perfect way to stock up on healthy food for the week.
  • Think outside the box. Social situations involving alcohol may be hard to avoid, but if you have any control over the plans, suggest other places to meet up with friends that don’t normally involve alcohol, such as weekend brunch.
  • Team up. Don’t do it alone. Friendly support and a small dose of competition is a great motivational tonic, so team up with someone else.

Top Natural Ways to Boost Your Immunity

May 28, 2017

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If you are one of those unlucky people who seem to catch every cold going around the office, or everything your kids bring home from school, here are some effective natural ways you can give you immune health a boost to fight off any infections.

A strong immune system is dependent on you having a healthy nutritious diet containing important immune-boosting nutrients such as vitamins A, C and D, minerals zinc and selenium and antioxidants. There are also certain herbs and foods that have immune-stimulating properties, which help enhance immune function and protect the body against disease.

Garlic contains ‘allicin’ that has powerful, immune-enhancing actions. Garlic is also a good source of vitamins A, C, and the minerals selenium, sulphur and zinc, all of which play pivotal roles in immune function. Eating garlic regularly will help protect you against infections, colds and flu, as it has anti-bacterial and anti-viral action. Make sure you cut or crush your garlic first to release the allicin. Cooking can destroy some of garlics beneficial compounds so eating it raw in dips and dressings, or lightly cooked in dishes is the best way to have it.

Echinacea is best known for its ability to act on our immune system to prevent or treat colds and flu. Echinacea contains phenolic compounds, which have the ability to stimulate the immune system, increasing the activity and number of immune cells such as T-cells and macrophages. Echinacea stimulates the overall activity of immune cells making them more efficient in attacking bacteria and viruses. Echinacea can be drank as a tea, found in Bodhi Organic ImmuniTEA, or taken as a liquid extract or in tablet form.

Seaweed is touted as a super food because it is not only extremely nutritious but also contains extraordinary health-promoting compounds that are not found in any other plant. Seaweed helps boost immune system function, reducing the risk of cold and flu.

There are many different types of seaweed including kelp, nori, and akrame, which you can purchase from health food stores and supermarkets. Try adding small strips of seaweed to soups, salads and stir-fries, or make nori rolls or sushi.

Shiitake mushrooms have been extensively studied for their many healing and immune boosting properties. A compound found in this mushroom, called lentinan, has been found to be a most powerful immune strengthener and ‘restorative’. Lentinan enhances the immune system’s ability to combat infections and disease.

These white blood cells destroy cells infected by viruses.

Ginger root is a lovely warming spice that has been used by Chinese herbalists for over 2,500 years to treat colds. Ginger has the ability to stimulate the immune system. Ginger can activate T-cells, which are a critical part of our immune defenses. These white blood cells destroy cells infected by viruses. The impressive anti-inflammatory properties of ginger are well known and have been extensively studied. Ginger can be drunk as a tea, found in Bodhi Organic ZesTEA, or added to veggie juices, stir-fries, salads, smoothies, or sauces.

Miso is a highly nutritious food and contains numerous health-promoting benefits.  Unpasteurised organic miso contains active lactobacillus, a bacteria beneficial for improving digestion and strengthening the immune system.  Beneficial bacteria like that found in miso help promote the proliferation of ‘friendly’ bacteria in the bowel which plays a big role in our immune health, digestion, and production of certain vitamins such as B12 and K (needed for healthy blood clotting). Miso is also a good source of zinc, needed for strong immune function.

The beneficial bacteria present in unpasteurized miso are killed by prolonged cooking at high temperatures, so add miso to preparations just before removing them from the heat. Keep miso paste in the fridge and use 1 tsp to add flavour and nutrients to soups, stir-fry’s, casseroles, sauces, salad dressings, and mashed potato.

Yoghurt: There is strong scientific evidence demonstrating yoghurt’s action to enhance and promote healthy immune function. Researchers attribute yoghurt’s health-promoting effects to its live bacteria content, namely acidophilus and bifidus. These beneficial bacteria help promote the health and growth of ‘friendly’ bowel bacteria, which play a major role in our immune function, proper digestion and production of certain vitamins.

Make sure you are getting the most out of yoghurt; look for the ‘live and active cultures or bacteria’ seal on the yoghurt you buy. The best way to include immune-boosting yoghurt in your diet is served on breakfast cereal, mixed into porridge or Bircher muesli, as a topping on pancakes and muffins, and in dips and smoothies.

Vitamin C is essential for health and has the reputation as a ‘master’ immune-boosting nutrient that strengthens immune function to fight off colds and infections.  Vitamin C has antiviral, antibacterial and anti-allergenic activity.

The best sources of vitamin C include citrus fruits, kiwi fruit, berries, parsley, broccoli, red capsicum and cabbage. Supplementation is recommended at around 3g maintenance dose a day, or 4-5g a day if you have a cold.

Zinc is an extremely important mineral that is vital for good health and plays a major role in immunity. Zinc is needed for the production of white blood cells, which protect against colds and infections.

Zinc rich food sources include lean meat, chicken, fish, milk and other dairy foods (cheese), brewers yeast, eggs (yolks), legumes (lima beans, lentils, peas), wholegrains (bread), sunflower seeds, pumpkin seeds and pecan nuts. Zinc is lost during the refinement or processing of grains so wholegrain products should always be chosen over the refined equivalents, in order to maximize zinc intake. Supplementation is recommended at around 50mg of zinc daily (adult dosage).

Vitamin D – “the sunshine vitamin” – is heralded as being important for boosting our immunity. Without sufficient vitamin D we are more vulnerable to illness and chronic disease. Sunlight is the easiest and healthiest way to get sufficient vitamin D.

During winter you should try and get 2-3 hours of sunlight a week, on the face, arms and hands.

During winter you should try and get 2-3 hours of sunlight a week, on the face, arms and hands. It can be difficult in winter to get adequate vitamin D from sunlight so it is recommended that you increase your intake of vitamin D rich foods such as eggs (yolk), fish liver oil (cod liver oil) and oily fish (salmon, trout, mackerel, and sardines). Milk such as cow’s, soy and rice are also fortified with vitamin D. Supplementation is recommended for people who have low vitamin D status, take around 1000 iu of vitamin D3 daily.

Andrographis (Andrographis paniculata) is an Ayurvedic herb, which is also known as “Indian Echinacea”. Andrographis is used to help support immune system function, having antimicrobial properties, helping to reduce the severity of cold and flu, fever, and upper respiratory infections. Andrographis can increase the body’s resistance to infection by stimulating the production of antibodies and macrophages.

Elderflower (Sambucus nigra) is commonly used by herbalists to treat respiratory problems such as colds and flu and sinus infections, helping to clear congestion (anti-catarrhal), and reduce high fevers and inflammation. Elderflower has an anti-bacterial action and helps support immune function. Elderflower contains phytochemicals and anxtioxidant that help protect the body from oxidative damage and support the immune system. Elderflower contains immune strengthening and anti-inflammatory nutrients vitamin C and A, and the flavonoid quercetin. Elder has also had a long history of being used for alleviating allergy symptoms.

Astragalus (Astragalus membranaceus) is a Traditional Chinese Medicine that has been used for thousands of years to help support and strengthen the immune system. Astragalus is beneficial for preventing cold and flu and upper respiratory infections.

By Lisa Guy
Lisa is a well-respected Sydney naturopath, author, mum and passionate foodie. Lisa has been practicing for 16 years out of her Rose Bay clinic called ‘Art of Healing’ (www.artofhealing.com.au). Lisa is also the founder of Bodhi Organic Tea (www.bodhiorganictea.com), an organic herbal tea company that makes beautiful unique tea blends, all naturopathically blended to help promote better health and wellbeing.

Article sourced from: https://blog.innerorigin.com/top-natural-ways-boost-immunity/

Healthy Inspirations Recipe of the Week – Hungarian Mushroom Soup

May 11, 2017

soup

The spices and sour cream turn this simple soup into something special. Serves 6

Ingredients

4 Tbsp butter
2 cups chopped onion
500g mushrooms, sliced
2 tsp dried dill
1 Tbsp paprika
1 Tbsp soy sauce
2 cups vegetable (or chicken) stock
1 cup cream
2 tsp lemon juice
1/4 cup chopped fresh parsley
1/2 cup sour cream

Method

  1. Melt the butter in a large pot over medium heat. Saute the onions in the butter for 5 minutes.
  2. Add the mushrooms and saute for 5 more minutes.
  3. Stir in the dill, paprika, soy sauce and stock. Reduce the heat to low, cover, and simmer for 15 minutes.
  4. Pour the cream into the soup and stir well to blend. Cover and simmer without boiling for 15 more minutes, stirring occasionally.
  5. Stir in the lemon juice, parsley and sour cream. All ow to heat through over low heat, about 3-5 minutes. Do not boil. Season with salt and pepper to taste and serve immediately.

Healthy Inspirations Recipe of the Week – Slow-cooked Pork Roast

May 4, 2017

Pork-Loin-copy1[87]
Slow-cooked Pork Roast
Serves 4

Ingredients

1.5kg boneless pork loin roast
2 Tbsp coconut oil
5 cloves garlic, minced
1 onion, thinly sliced
1 Tbsp chili powder
2 tsp ground coriander
2 tsp ground cumin
¼ cup apple cider vinegar
1 ½ cups water or gluten-free vegetable stock
1 (400g) can whole tomatoes, with juices
2 bay leaves
1 Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste

Method

  1. Sprinkle all sides of the pork roast with a generous amount of salt and pepper.
  2. In a large skillet over a medium-high heat, add the coconut oil and then sear the meat on all sides until it begins to turn slightly golden brown. Once finished, place in the slow-cooker.
  3. In the same skillet used for the pork, combine the garlic, onion, chili powder, coriander, and cumin. Mix well, scraping up the left-over meat bits in the pan.
  4. Add the vinegar to the skillet and allow it to come to a boil. Continue cook until the liquid is nearly evaporated.
  5. Finally add the water or stock to the skillet, using it to whisk up all the drippings and spices in the pan. Pour the whole thing into the slow-cooker with the pork roast.
  6. Crush the tomatoes over the roast, followed by the tomato juices. Add the bay leaves, give it a good stir and adjust the seasoning by adding more salt and pepper, if needed.
  7. Set your slow-cooker to low and cook for about 8 hours. Once the meat pulls apart easily and it is not too pink in the centre it is ready to serve.
  8. Discard the bay leaves, carve the roast in thick slices and serve with the cooking liquid as a sauce.