Posts Tagged ‘Coffee’

Sweet Poison – sugar, it never fully satisfies our cravings.

August 12, 2014

addiction
In the last 24 hours, I’ve drunk several cups of coffee, each one sweetened with a sugar cube. I’ve eaten a bowl of porridge sprinkled liberally with brown sugar and I’ve enjoyed on three separate occasions, a piece of my date and apple birthday cake, to which the chef tells me he added one cup of castor sugar.

This is pretty standard fare for me (birthday celebrations notwithstanding) and although occasionally I fret that my sugar intake is perhaps a little high and that I should reign it in or else risk all manner of health problems down the track, I continue to indulge my sweet tooth. Although after listening to David Gillespie present at Happiness & Its Causes 2011, I’m seriously thinking I really do need to wean myself off the white stuff.

Gillespie, a former lawyer, is the author of Sweet Poison: why sugar makes us fat, whose thesis is that sugar, or more specifically fructose (of which folk are consuming, on average, about one kilo a week), actually does much more that pack on the kilos. It also makes us physically ill and exacts a significant toll on our mental health.

What we’ve come to identify as sugar is actually a combination of two molecules: fructose and glucose, the latter an indispensable element to the body’s healthy functioning. As Gillespie explains, “The glucose half is fine. It’s more than just fine; it’s vitally necessary for us. We are machines that run on the fuel of glucose.” Indeed, all the carbohydrates we consume – and which for most of us constitute about 60 per cent of our diet (everything else is proteins and fats) – are converted to glucose.

Fructose, on the other hand, is not metabolised by us for fuel but rather converted directly to fat. As Gillespie says, “By the time we finish a glass of apple juice, the first mouthful is already circulating in our arteries as fat.” But even worse than that, fructose messes with those hormonal signals which tell us we’re full so that we keep on eating sugary, fatty foods.

Two hormones in particular are affected, the first one being insulin “which responds immediately to the presence of all carbs except fructose,” says Gillespie. “When insulin goes up, appetite goes down. So insulin tells us, ‘all right, you’ve had a meal, stop eating’. Fructose does not provoke a response from insulin and in fact, over time, it makes us resistant to the signals we do get from everything else we eat.”

Leptin is produced by our fat cells and works as our “on board fuel gauge” in that the more fat cells we have, the more leptin we produce and the less hungry we are. The problem with fructose is it “makes us resistant to that signal,” says Gillespie.

And yes, this leads to all manner of health problems including Type 2 Diabetes and its associated symptoms including lethargy, blurred vision and skin infections, and what Gillespie says is “significant damage through something called glycation”, the destruction through the excessive production of so-called AGEs (advanced glycation end products) of our skin’s elasticity which causes hardening of our arteries and brittle skin, both unmistakable signs of ageing. Gillespie also cites some biochemistry studies that have found fructose accelerates the growth of pancreatic cancer tumours.

These are just some of the physical effects. The addictive quality of fructose means it’s also a bit of a downer and that’s because of how it interferes with the balance of two feel-good hormones in the brain, dopamine and serotonin. Gillespie explains, “It significantly ramps up our dopamine (released when we anticipate pleasure) at the expense of our serotonin (released when that pleasure is delivered).” In other words, it never fully satisfies our cravings, and as anyone who’s battled an addiction knows, unfulfilled cravings are never much fun.

Article sourced from: http://www.thinkandbehappy.com.au/eating-way-health-happiness/

Have a Cup of Coffee…it’s good for your health!

October 7, 2012
By JoAnn Bayus
Why It’s Okay to LOVE Coffee
One of my favorite daily activities is waking up early and enjoying a hot cup of black coffee. At times, people seem surprised that coffee is part of my morning routine, but the truth is that coffee offers many health benefits.
According to a WebMD interview with Dr. Peter Martin, Psychiatry/Pharmacology Expert at the Vanderbilt University of Medicine, coffee consumption reduces the risk of developing type 2 diabetes and has been shown to reduce mortality rates from heart attacks.
The positives don’t end there. Sipping that morning cup of coffee provides the following benefits as well:
  • Coffee is high in antioxidants and has been shown to reduce inflammation in the body.
  • Coffee has been shown to have a protective effect on the liver. According to a study conducted by Arthur Klasky, MD, of the Kaiser Permanente’s Division of Research, coffee drinking reduces the risk of liver damage in people at high risk for liver disease.
  •  Last, but certainly not least, coffee is good for your brain. In their book, The Happiness Diet, Tyler Graham and Dr. Drew Ramsey state that coffee is “proven to improve memory and reflexes.” Coffee consumption has also been shown to reduce the risk of developing dementia, Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease and depression, as well as increase mental focus and alertness. One slang term for coffee is brain juice!
Tips:
  • Quality does matter. Select organic coffee, as non-organic coffee beans are often sprayed with pesticides.
  • Don’t load your coffee with cream, sugar and other products that are bad for your health.
  • Be aware of your own health and wellness. Coffee does not agree with everyone and can have undesirable effects, such as irritability and stomach upset, for some people.
  • Coffee’s liver benefits should not give people a green light to engage in behaviors that cause damage to the liver such as heavy drinking. Obviously.

Information sourced from http://www.mindbodygreen.com/0-6309/Why-Its-Okay-to-Love-Coffee.html