Posts Tagged ‘Artificial Sweeteners’

Coffs Coast Health Club eNews – July 2015

July 2, 2015

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Christmas in July!!
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Come down to the main street of Sawtell and help us celebrate ‘Christmas in July’ at Split Cafe & Espresso Bar!
The awesome team at Split will be putting on a great cocktail menu for us & allowing everyone to BYO alcohol for the night. Juice, soft drinks, tea & coffee will be available for purchase from the cafe.  There will be an amazing strawberry laden Wicked Berries cake for dessert!
Where: Split Cafe & Espresso Bar, First Avenue, Sawtell

When: Friday 17th July from 6pm

Cost: $25 p/head

How: Book now at reception, via info@coffscoasthc.com.au or by calling 6658 6222 

The party is limited to the first 80 people to register & pay for their ticket, so get in quick!!!
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When Life Gets Tough Put On Your Boxing Gloves!
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Have you ever tried a PUNCH class?  PUNCH is your ultimate fitness based boxing class that incorporates upper body strength and endurance. It is a great way to let go of some negative energy while working on a fitter, stronger, leaner and healthier you.
PUNCH is on our timetable:
Mondays at 9.30am, Tuesdays at 5.30pm, Wednesdays at 6.00am, Thursdays at 5.30pm and Fridays at 9.30am
All classes are run by a personal trainer who can coach you, help you with your technique and push you to your limits.
You don’t need to bring a partner and boxing gloves and focus pads are supplied. So really there are no excuses…give a PUNCH class a try this week.
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Coffs Coast Health Club CENEX logo gray 2BUSINESS DIPLOMA NOW AVAILABLE on the Coffs Coast!
Gain a professional edge in Business, Management, Project Management, Human Resources, Workforce Planning and Marketing by developing your skills and knowledge to explore various roles across a variety of industries, and more with a BSB50207 Diploma of Business.  Business managers assist companies in reaching goals and objectives related to sales, productivity, profitability and industry penetration.  The Diploma of Business is designed by leaders in the business industry and is based on REAL life experience to make you the best business manager you can be. It provides you with a step-by-step business plan and shares the secrets of successful business leaders.
This qualification has been specifically designed by leaders in the business industry and is based on REAL life experience rather than on textbooks.
The course will arm you with the necessary skills you need whilst still allowing you the flexibility to tailor your course to suit your schedule. You can juggle your studies with work or other commitments, enabling you to have the best of both worlds and learn face to face, not just online only.
NEXT COURSE STARTS 21st September & runs until 11th December.
Mondays:         5pm – 9pm
Wednesdays:    5pm – 9pm
Fridays:            5pm – 9pm
Our Diploma of Business is VET FEE-HELP approved, so you can start studying towards your dream job today – with no time lost!
Contact Christian directly on 0412 778 736 for further information regarding the course and qualification.
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Short Term Workout Options for Friends & Family!
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Do you have friends or family that are in town during the school holidays? Would you like to save them some money & get them working out with you?
Well due to popular demand we are now offering some short term workout options for them…
Single Visit – adult only $15, student or baby boomer only $10, incl access during all supervised hours
Week Pass – adult only $29, student or baby boomer only $19, incl access during all supervised hours
Simply see reception or call 6658 6222 to take advantage of these offers for a limited time.
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Sugar Busters Program – Are Hidden Sugars Stopping Your Weight Loss?

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You’ve probably seen our Sugar Busters Board at Reception showing you how much sugar is in common foods and drinks.  Its been the topic of much discussion and also been quite a shock to some people how much sugar they are consuming and how much sugar can be that hidden culprit in weight gain.
The Healthy Inspirations team can now offer you a 4 week Sugar Busters program for $149 ($89  if you are already a health club member!) This includes 4 weeks access to all health club facilities, weekly 1:1 Sugar Buster Coaching Sessions, weekly Sugar Buster Phone Consults and your Sugar Buster Resource Kit!
Speak to Simone, Leslie or Jenny from the Healthy Inspirations Team or call them on 6658 6222 to get started.
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Coffs Coast Health Club, very own Dance for Cancer 2015 participant – Jacqui Barnett!
JacquiJarrattProfile1This fundraising event, which will be held on Saturday 14th November, has been running for 6 years on the Coffs Coast and although it has gone through a couple of name changes it is a fantastic night of entertainment with each participant strutting their stuff on the dance floor to compete in 3 categories with all proceeds going to the Cancer Council.  Leading up to the event Jacqui will be running 2 fundraising events so save Friday August 28th for a Fun and Fabulous Trivia Night with a Twist and Friday October 30th for a Halloween Cocktail party.  More details on the way.  Donations can be made initially straight in to the Cancer Council charity box at reception!
Here’s the link to the Facebook page
https://www.facebook.com/pages/Stars-of-Coffs-Coast-Dance-for-Cancer/1584019218507518?notif_t=fbpage_fan_invite jump on, like, comment and share!
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Be Rewarded For Your Hard Work In Julyimage001

Reward yourself this month at Coffs Coast Health Club. Not only do we provide the latest fitness & strength equipment as well as a huge range of cutting edge classes from the low intensity Seniors & Baby Boomer classes, through fun dance classes like Zumba, to high intensity Boxing, Circuit, Pump & Cycling classes but we would like to reward you for all your hard work.
For the month of July, Coffs Coast Health Club is offering a chance to win a FREE 60 Minute Massage each week with our Fabulous Masseuses for the Fitness Passport Member who visits the most in a week.
To win is simple, take time out of your busy day and treat yourself physically, emotional and spiritually with as many workouts as you can!
A winner will be draw at the end of each week in July, the more you train the more chance to win!

If you would like to know more call us on 6658 6222 or email us at info@coffscoasthc.com.au
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Climb 4 The Chopper!mount-kilimanjaro-np

Have you ever wanted to achieve a goal so big you can’t see it from the bottom, yet you know in 7 days you will have reached the summit?

Picture this. You are 5895 metres high, on the roof of Africa, just about to take your final steps on to the summit of the Dark Continent’s highest mountain; the beautiful and majestic Mt Kilimanjaro. As you reach the summit, the memories, the struggles and tribulations of the past seven days of adventure come flooding back and culminate into one euphoric emotion. At that moment, the feeling of achievement and success in reaching your goal is almost overwhelming…… YOU FEEL ALIVE!!

Peak Potential Adventures in support of Westpac Life Saver Rescue Helicopter give you this opportunity to climb to the summit of the world’s highest free standing mountain from the 4th to the 13th of December!

Feel like this is something you want to be involved with? Contact Russ Holland on 0407 524 752 ASAP to secure your place for the adventure of a lifetime!

As an incentive, Coffs Coast Health Club are offering a FREE Mountain Fit program to help you climb the mountain of success!
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Welcome DanIMG_3683

Dan has recently come on board with us as a Personal Trainer. He is keen to help steer you in the right direction of health and fitness.

Dan has great sporting back ground, playing with the Coffs Harbour Comets Rugby League club and now being back on board with them as their Trainer, helping steer them towards another victory.

Dan has recently returned from the Baltimore in the US where he completed an internship at the headquarters of Under Armour. There he learnt how to train everyone from NFL players to the normal person wanting to get fitter and lose weight. Dan now has another way of making you head to your goals and have fun doing it.

If you see Dan on the floor, have a chat with him and introduce yourself and make him feel welcomed to the Coffs Coast Health Club Team.
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Clearance Sale Now Onimages

The weather has already cooled down so now is the time to update your NEW wardrobe.
We have stock that we need to move to make way for new exciting merchandise coming soon! We need your help to make this happen, and you save money! We think its a win win!

SALE Starts:       Wednesday 1st of July
SALE Finishes:   Friday 31st of July
SAVE 20% off the entire Coffs Coast Health Club Clothing Range!
Remember the best things go first, so hurry in.
See your friendly Reception team to find out more. Hurry while stocks last!
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Flash Sales for the Month of Julyimages (1)

At Coffs Coast Health Club all Supplements are on sale in July!
We are the exclusive stockist of all Nano products on the Mid North Coast
We will be heavily discounting stock at different times throughout the whole month of JULY!

Prices NEVER seen at Coffs Coast Health Club!
All supplements can be taste tested throughout the month
Ask your trainer which supplement will help you reach your goal faster.

Thinking of trying something new? Ask us how we can help you TODAY!
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“Clear your Head, Make a Difference” ~ Why Not Go Dry in July?  Im-Dry-this-July

Dry July is a fundraiser that challenges you to go booze-free for a month to support adults living with cancer.  It helps you get healthy and clear your head while also raising funds for an important cause.

Dry July takes a lighter-hearted approach to raising funds for a serious issue.  You don’t often get the chance to raise money for charity by not doing something! It is a challenge of determination that rewards participants with a great sense of achievement and feeling of wellbeing.

Taking part in Dry July gives you the chance to also focus on yourself – notice your own drinking habits and the value of a healthy, balanced lifestyle. Dry Julyers recognise a multitude of benefits themselves such as increased energy levels, a clearer head and clearer skin!

Dry Julyers are supported by an online community of other participants, ambassadors and partners providing advice, help and encouragement throughout the challenge.

Check out the Wellbeing Website if you plan on kick starting some healthy lifestyle changes with Dry July http://wellbeing.dryjuly.com

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Start Shaping Up

August 19, 2014

IT’S TIME TO SHAPE UPshapeup

As a nation, our waistlines are growing. Today, over 63% of Australian adults and one in four children are overweight or obese.

Unhealthy eating and not enough physical activity can lead to overweight and obesity, and an increased risk of developing a chronic disease such as some cancers, heart disease and type 2 diabetes.

Shape Up Australia is an initiative to help Australians reduce their waist measurements and improve their overall health and wellbeing. There are many everyday changes you can make to help you Shape Up and get on your way to a healthier lifestyle.


GETTING ACTIVE

Life can be busy, and it’s easy to think that there just isn’t enough time to be physically active.  But being physically active doesn’t mean you have to spend hours exercising each day or that you have to push yourself to the point of feeling exhausted.

There are great benefits to getting even a small amount of physical activity each day, both mentally and physically.  Being active gives you more energy, helps you sleep better, reduces the risk of depression and can help to prevent a range of chronic diseases.

You can start with small changes, like increasing the distance you walk by getting off the bus earlier or parking your car further away from the shops.  Gradually increase the amount of physical activity you do – it all adds up.  Aim for 30 minutes (or more) of moderate-intensity activity most days of the week.

If you’re worried you don’t have the time, keep in mind that you don’t have to do your 30 minutes (or more) all at once – combine a few shorter sessions of 10 to 15 minutes each throughout the day.  Those short bursts are just as effective as longer exercise sessions.

To get started, check out these physical activity tips or find activities in your local area using the activity finder.

GETTING PHYSICAL TIPS

Tips for being more physically active every day

  • The saying “no pain, no gain” is a myth.  Some activity is better than none, and more is better than a little.  But you don’t have to exercise to the point of collapse to get a health benefit.  Aim for at least 30 minutes of moderate-intensity activity on most, preferably all, days of the week.
  • Set a date for when you will start. Write the date down and stick to it.
  • Make time to be physically active and schedule it as you would an appointment.  The Shape Up activity planner can help you plan and track your activity.
  • Set short-term and long-term goals.  Make your goals specific, measurable and achievable.  Rather than a vague goal like “I will get fit”, try “I will walk every day for 10 minutes after meals” or “I will get off the bus/train two stops earlier than my usual stop”.
  • Build up gradually.  If you are starting a new activity or have been inactive for some time, start at a level that you can manage easily and gradually build up.
  • Choose activities that are right for you.  Do something that you enjoy or go for something different you’ve always wanted to try, such as walking, jogging, joining a team sport, taking a group fitness class, dancing, cycling or swimming.
  • Mix it up.  Consider changing your activities every so often to avoid becoming bored.
  • Plan physical activity with others.  This can help you stick to your plan and achieve your goals.
  • Do not give up before you start to see the benefits.  Be patient and keep at it.
  • HAVE FUN! Physical activity can make you feel good about yourself and it’s a great opportunity to have fun with other people or enjoy some time to yourself.

FINDING TIME TO GET ACTIVE

It can seem hard to find time for physical activity.  One solution is to look for opportunities to build as much physical activity into everyday activities as you can.  Here are some ideas to get you started:

  • Rather than spend five minutes circling a car park looking for that “perfect space” right near the entrance, park five minutes away and spend that time walking instead.
  • If you arrive at a bus or tram stop early, why not make use of the time to walk to the next stop?
  • Walk rather than rest on escalators… it’s quicker so you’ll actually save time! (Or better still, use the stairs).
  • Work in the garden – get into some energetic gardening activities like digging, shifting soil and mowing the lawn to raise your heart-rate.
  • Clean the house! Activities like vacuuming, cleaning windows and scrubbing floors that raise your heart rate are all good examples of moderate intensity physical activity.
  • Park further away from work (or get off public transport a few stops early).  If you walk for 10 minutes to and from work, you’ll have done 20 minutes without even noticing.  Add a 10 minute brisk walk (or more!) at lunch time and you’ve met the guidelines for the day.

ACTIVITY INTENSITY

What is moderate intensity activity?

Moderate-intensity activity will cause a slight but noticeable increase in your breathing and heart rate.  A good example of moderate-intensity activity is brisk walking; that is, at a pace where you are able to talk comfortably, but not sing.  Moderate-intensity activity should be carried out for at least 10 minutes at a time.

What is vigorous activity?

Vigorous activity is where you “huff and puff”; where talking in full sentences between breaths is difficult.  Vigorous activity can come from such sports as football, squash, netball, basketball and activities such as aerobics, speed walking, jogging and fast cycling.

Note: If you are pregnant, have been previously inactive, or suffer from any medical conditions, it is recommended that you seek medical advice before commencing vigorous physical activity.

WHAT SHOULD I BE EATING

Eating a diet that includes a variety of nutritious foods every day helps us maintain a healthy weight, feel good and fight off chronic disease.

Best of all, healthy eating doesn’t have to be hard if you follow these seven golden rules:

  1. Drink plenty of water
  2. Eat more vegetables and fruit
  3. Watch how much you eat – even foods that are good for us, when eaten in large portions, can lead to weight gain
  4. Eat less processed food
  5. Eat regular meals – don’t skip meals – and always start the day with a healthy breakfast (e.g. a bowl of hi fibre cereal with sliced banana and low fat milk)
  6. Restrict your alcohol intake
  7. Remember that some foods are high in added fat, salt and sugar and so are best eaten only sometimes or in small amounts.  Examples include lollies, chocolate, biscuits, cakes, pastries, soft drinks, chips, pies, sausage rolls and other takeaways.

To help you eat well every day, check out these healthy recipes and snack suggestions, tips for staying on track when eating out, our guide to healthy eating on a budget, and tips for drinking to health.

Snack suggestions

  • Add fruit and yoghurt to low fat milk and blend them together to make a great tasting smoothie.
  • A slice of wholegrain bread or raisin toast with a healthy spread such as avocado or low-fat cream cheese, makes a filling, healthy snack.
  • A piece of fruit – like a banana or apple – can make a great “on the run” snack.
  • Instead of reaching for a chocolate bar or packet of chips, try vegetable sticks with low-fat hummus.
  • An occasional handful of unsalted nuts or dried fruit makes a nutritious snack.
  • Grab a tub of natural low-fat yoghurt and add your own fruit.
  • Air-popped popcorn with a sprinkling of salt makes a great afternoon snack.
  • When the weather is hot, fruits such as oranges and grapes make delicious frozen snacks.

Other useful links:

Australian Dietary Guidelines www.eatforhealth.gov.au

Stay On Track When Eating Out Fact Sheet

Your Guide To Buying Fruit And Veg In Season Fact Sheet

Information sourced from this Government Website: http://www.shapeup.gov.au/start-shaping-up

Sweet Poison – sugar, it never fully satisfies our cravings.

August 12, 2014

addiction
In the last 24 hours, I’ve drunk several cups of coffee, each one sweetened with a sugar cube. I’ve eaten a bowl of porridge sprinkled liberally with brown sugar and I’ve enjoyed on three separate occasions, a piece of my date and apple birthday cake, to which the chef tells me he added one cup of castor sugar.

This is pretty standard fare for me (birthday celebrations notwithstanding) and although occasionally I fret that my sugar intake is perhaps a little high and that I should reign it in or else risk all manner of health problems down the track, I continue to indulge my sweet tooth. Although after listening to David Gillespie present at Happiness & Its Causes 2011, I’m seriously thinking I really do need to wean myself off the white stuff.

Gillespie, a former lawyer, is the author of Sweet Poison: why sugar makes us fat, whose thesis is that sugar, or more specifically fructose (of which folk are consuming, on average, about one kilo a week), actually does much more that pack on the kilos. It also makes us physically ill and exacts a significant toll on our mental health.

What we’ve come to identify as sugar is actually a combination of two molecules: fructose and glucose, the latter an indispensable element to the body’s healthy functioning. As Gillespie explains, “The glucose half is fine. It’s more than just fine; it’s vitally necessary for us. We are machines that run on the fuel of glucose.” Indeed, all the carbohydrates we consume – and which for most of us constitute about 60 per cent of our diet (everything else is proteins and fats) – are converted to glucose.

Fructose, on the other hand, is not metabolised by us for fuel but rather converted directly to fat. As Gillespie says, “By the time we finish a glass of apple juice, the first mouthful is already circulating in our arteries as fat.” But even worse than that, fructose messes with those hormonal signals which tell us we’re full so that we keep on eating sugary, fatty foods.

Two hormones in particular are affected, the first one being insulin “which responds immediately to the presence of all carbs except fructose,” says Gillespie. “When insulin goes up, appetite goes down. So insulin tells us, ‘all right, you’ve had a meal, stop eating’. Fructose does not provoke a response from insulin and in fact, over time, it makes us resistant to the signals we do get from everything else we eat.”

Leptin is produced by our fat cells and works as our “on board fuel gauge” in that the more fat cells we have, the more leptin we produce and the less hungry we are. The problem with fructose is it “makes us resistant to that signal,” says Gillespie.

And yes, this leads to all manner of health problems including Type 2 Diabetes and its associated symptoms including lethargy, blurred vision and skin infections, and what Gillespie says is “significant damage through something called glycation”, the destruction through the excessive production of so-called AGEs (advanced glycation end products) of our skin’s elasticity which causes hardening of our arteries and brittle skin, both unmistakable signs of ageing. Gillespie also cites some biochemistry studies that have found fructose accelerates the growth of pancreatic cancer tumours.

These are just some of the physical effects. The addictive quality of fructose means it’s also a bit of a downer and that’s because of how it interferes with the balance of two feel-good hormones in the brain, dopamine and serotonin. Gillespie explains, “It significantly ramps up our dopamine (released when we anticipate pleasure) at the expense of our serotonin (released when that pleasure is delivered).” In other words, it never fully satisfies our cravings, and as anyone who’s battled an addiction knows, unfulfilled cravings are never much fun.

Article sourced from: http://www.thinkandbehappy.com.au/eating-way-health-happiness/

A Reason to Skip Artificial Sweeteners

October 17, 2013

A new study may make you think twice before adding Splenda to your coffee.

Published in the journal Diabetes Care, Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis researchers found that sucralose, most popularly known by the brand name Splenda, has effects on the body’s responses to sugar (glucose) — which could thereby affect diabetes risk — despite the fact that it has zero calories.

“Our results indicate that this artificial sweetener is not inert — it does have an effect,” study researcher M. Yanina Pepino, Ph.D., research assistant professor of medicine at the university, said in a statement. “And we need to do more studies to determine whether this observation means long-term use could be harmful.”

The new study included 17 people who were severely obese (they had a body mass index over 42; 30 is considered the starting point for obesity) and who didn’t regularly consume artificially sweetened products. The study participants drank sucralose or water before taking a glucose challenge test. This test involves drinking a sugary solution before undergoing blood sugar measurements in order to see how well the body responds to sugar; it’s typically used as a tool to determine if a woman has gestational diabetes, according to the Mayo Clinic.

After that, the researchers asked all the study participants who first drank water to then drink sucralose before undergoing another glucose challenge test, and all those who first drank sucralose to then drink water before undergoing another glucose challenge test. Researchers found that consuming the sucralose was associated with higher blood sugar peaks and 20 percent higher insulin levels compared with consuming the water, though they noted more studies are needed to determine the actual health effects of a 20 percent increase in insulin.

It’s important to understand how exactly insulin and blood sugar play a role in Type 2 diabetes. Insulin is a hormone produced by the pancreas that assists in the absorption of sugar into cells and also helps to decrease the amount of sugar that is circulating in the blood. The amount of insulin secreted into the bloodstream is related to the amount of sugar circulating; when there is less sugar, there is less insulin being secreted, according to the Mayo Clinic. With Type 2 diabetes, cells become insulin-resistant, and the pancreas isn’t able to produce enough insulin to get the cells to take up the sugar. When this happens, sugar accumulates in the blood.

The increases in insulin levels in the new study could show that the participants’ bodies are able to produce insulin to accommodate the glucose — or it could be a risk factor for diabetes because when a body is constantly secreting insulin, it raises the risk of cells becoming resistant to the hormone.

 

But still, even though “we found that sucralose affects the glucose and insulin response to glucose ingestion, we don’t know the mechanism responsible,” Pepino said in the statement. “We have shown that sucralose is having an effect. In obese people without diabetes, we have shown sucralose is more than just something sweet that you put into your mouth with no other consequences.”

Past research in animals has suggested that artificial sweeteners have effects on fasting glucose levels. Particularly, research presented at a 2011 meeting of the American Diabetes Association showed that aspartame — another kind of artificial sweetener — is linked with higher fasting glucose levels in mice, TIME reported.

According to Dr. Melina Jampolis, who is an internist and physician nutrition specialist, research in both animals and humans suggests the taste of sweet can boost appetite, and also reinforce cravings for and dependence on sugar. She told HuffPost:

Laboratory and animal studies have found an increase in insulin with some artificial sweeteners, which could drop your blood sugar and make you crave more sugar, but there is no consistent evidence for this in humans. There is some evidence in humans that artificial sweeteners may subjectively increase appetite. However in the context of a meal, it is not known if it causes an increase in hunger and if so, if this outweighs the decrease in calories consumed.

As far as a link between a big source of artificial sweeteners — diet drinks — and diabetes, research has been a little more mixed. A study presented at the same American Diabetes Association meeting showed that diet soda-drinkers had dramatically bigger waistlines over a nearly 10-year period, compared with non-diet soda drinkers — and weight is, of course, a huge risk factor for diabetes.

And a study released earlier this year in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition showed an association between diet soda and higher Type 2 diabetes risk. That research interestingly showed that while diet and regular soda drinkers had higher Type 2 diabetes risks, those who imbibed with diet had an even higher diabetes risk.

However, a big study in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition published in 2011 showed that diet sodas actually may not raise diabetes risk, and that the association could be attributed to the fact that people with diabetes or who are obese drink more diet drinks than other people, Reuters reported.

“People who are at risk for diabetes or obesity … those may be the people who are more likely to choose artificial sweeteners because they may be more likely to be dieting,” National Institutes of Health endocrinologist Rebecca Brown, an artificial sweetener researcher who was not involved in the 2011 study, told Reuters.

But still, there’s no question that some good old H2O trumps sodas — diet or not — to quench thirst and hydrate the body.

Be social & share

 

This article was sourced from http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/06/03/splenda-blood-sugar-sucralose-insulin_n_3362122.html

The Truth About Artificial Sweeteners

April 23, 2013
The Truth About Artificial Sweeteners

Xylitol, sorbitol, and mannitol are all artificial sweeteners that are called sugar alcohols or polyols.  They are helpful for those trying to control the amount of calories in their diet and also for diabetics.  Read on to learn more about these artificial sweeteners and whether they are safe, and what role they play in weight loss.

Xylitol

Xylitol is a sugar alcohol that is used as a sugar substitute.  It occurs naturally and it is found in the fibrous vegetables and fruit, as well as in corn cobs and various hardwood trees such as birch.  In fact, it is produced naturally in our bodies.  It is roughly as sweet as sucrose but only has two thirds of the energy.  One teaspoon of xylitol contains 9.6 calories, while one teaspoon of sugar contains 15 calories.  There are zero net effective carbohydrates in xylitol while sugar has 4 grams per teaspoon.  Xylitol is safe for diabetics as it has less impact on blood sugar levels than regular sugars do.  It has a GI of 7, while sugar has a GI of 100.  It is used in cooking, baking, in beverages, chewing gum, mints, and other products such as nasal and mouth washes.

Xylitol is safe for teeth as it does not encourage tooth decay, and may actively aid in repairing minor cavities.  Research has confirmed that plaque is reduced when xylitol is consumed as it attracts and then starves harmful micro-organisms allowing the mouth to re-mineralise damaged teeth with less interruption.  Xylitol does not contribute to high blood sugar levels or the resulting hyperglycaemia caused by insufficient insulin response.  It may also have potential as a treatment for osteoporosis.  Xylitol-based chewing gum can help to prevent ear infections as the act of chewing and swallowing helps with the disposal of earwax and clearing the middle ear, while the xylitol prevents the growth of bacteria in the Eustachian tubes.

Xylitol may help to control oral infections of candida yeast.  It is safe for pregnant and nursing women and regular use can significantly reduce the probability of transmitting bacteria that is responsible for tooth decay from mother to child during the first two years of life by as much as 80 percent.

However, xylitol, like most sugar alcohols, can have a laxative effect as it is not fully broken down during digestion.  It has no known toxicity.

Sorbitol

Sorbitol, also known as glucitol, is a sugar alcohol that is slowly metabolised by the body.  It is mainly used in sugar free mints and various cough syrups, and is usually listed under the inactive ingredients.  It is also used in diet foods, and sugar-free chewing gum.  Sorbitol also occurs naturally in many stone fruits and berries from trees of the Sorbus genus.  It is known as a nutritive sweetener as it gives 11 kilojoules of energy per gram as opposed to the 17 kilojoules of energy per gram of sugar and starch.  It is about sixty percent as sweet as sucrose with one third fewer calories.  It does not promote tooth decay and is helpful for people with diabetes.

Consuming large amounts of sorbitol can lead to abdominal pain, gas, and mild to severe diarrhea.  It can also aggravate irritable bowel syndrome and fructose malabsorption.

Mannitol

Mannitol is a polyol or sugar alcohol that was originally isolated from the secretions of the Flowering Ash, called Manna after their resemblance to the biblical food.  Chemically, it is similar to xylitol and sorbitol.  Mannitol is used as a sweetener for people with diabetes, and is commonly used as a sweetener in breath freshening candies as it has a cooling effect.  It is about 50 percent as sweet as sucrose.  It does not promote tooth decay and has a low caloric content.  Mannitol does not pick up moisture and for this reason it is often used as a dusting powder for chewing gum.  Due to its high melting point, it is also used in chocolate-flavoured coating agents for ice cream and sweets.

Artificial Sweeteners and Weight Loss

Xylitol, sorbitol, and mannitol are all sugar alcohols that have a lower caloric value than sugars.  In this way, they can help people to achieve their weight goals.  They are incompletely absorbed by the body and what is absorbed is metabolised by insulin-independent mechanisms or excreted via the urine.  A significant amount of what is not absorbed is metabolised to short chain fatty acids and gases in the large intestine.  Xylitol has 2.4 calories per gram; sorbitol 2.6 calories per gram; and mannitol 1.6 calories per gram.  This is compared to the traditional 4 calories per gram that sugar has.  All sugar alcohols have a low GI, and they can be used to completely or partially replace traditional sugars such as sucrose and glucose.  This helps to reduce the overall glycaemic load of the diet, thus assisting with weight loss.

However, some studies have shown that products that contain artificial sweeteners can actually help to promote weight gain.  The theory is that when the body tastes sweetness, it prepares itself for a calorie load.  If the sweetness occurs without the related calories, such as when artificial sweeteners are used, we either keep on eating or reduce our calorie-burning metabolic activity.  It is currently recommended that foods and drinks that contain artificial sweeteners be used in moderation.  Do not use them as an excuse to indulge in other high calorie foods or to skip physical activity that is important to weight control and health.

Information sourced from: http://www.naturaltherapypages.com.au/article/artificial_sweeteners?utm_source=outbrain&utm_medium=affiliate&utm_campaign=%20generaltest#ixzz2R5OYtZH0